Baltimore Espantoons

Saturday, 23 May 2020 15:08

Baltimore Protest Painting 72Courtesy Eli Alaman
22 February 1941 Strike, Baltimore Police
Digital Painting by Ken

Espantoon

Espantoon Info/History

Webster's Third Edition: defines an espantoon as follows; "An espantoon In Baltimore, a policeman's club" We would like to start out by saying we collect nightsticks, espantoons, batons, truncheons, billy clubs etc. - If you have one for sale, or that you would like to donate, please, let us know as we are interested.  For what might be obvious reasons we particularly like the Baltimore espantoon. Aside from their being the stick carried by our brothers/sisters in law enforcement, they also show a progression not just in what we carried, or had made, but what the department had made for us and issued to us. That said, while we like Baltimore sticks, we collect all sticks, from any state in the US, to any country in the world.

We have always been serious about the Espantoon, and why Baltimore City Police are the only police department in the world that uses an espantoon? Also, why if a Baltimore County Officer and a Baltimore City Officer both have their sticks made by the same guy (let's say Nightstick Joe) why would one guy's stick is a baton or nightstick, and the other is an Espantoon? We talked to several old-timers over the years asking about the nomenclature of our Espantoon. We were told over and over, that the part that looks like the handle at the top is actually not the handle and is called the, "Barrel Head" next to that is the, "Thong Groove," the "Ring Stop" and the "Shaft." The word, "Barrel Head," might be a mispronunciation that if correctly pronounced, may have solved this riddle much earlier, but we worked with what we had! For years we knew the difference, we just couldn't find the words to explain it. That was until reading a newspaper article one night, when Ken read the question asked  by the reporter, it was a question that flipped the switch in Ken's mind, and once it was, it was like the old saying, "It couldn't be unseen!" Now it seems we had more ways to describe, or answer the question, So what was the 1970's newspaper man's question, he asked, "If a Baltimore City Officer gifts his Espantoon to a Baltimore County Officer, is it still an espantoon?" The answer in Ken's eyes was, No, and as odd as it may sound like so many police issues, it all comes down to training. For years when asked, what makes an Espantoon, an Espantoon, the satisfactory answer was, "Webster's 3rd edition dictionary says it is!" That has not been acceptable to us, so we dug further, reading every newspaper article, every general order and every policy. Doing so gave us what we think is the truest of answers. Baltimore turns a nightstick into an Espantoon because what looks like a "Handle" is the "Barrel Head," (most likely originally pronounced, "Burl Head") whereas everywhere else in the world the part that looks like a handle, is a handle, but in Baltimore City, we turn the stick around, and that handle looking part is the striking end. If a City and County Officer traded sticks, they would each take their new stick and use it according to their training, one having a nightstick with a handle, the other having an espantoon with a burl head. That, is what makes, a Nightstick, an Espantoon. What follows is some supporting documentation on the subject.  

As for the old answer to; What makes an espantoon? A name for a nightstick that is only used by the Baltimore police. — Here, is the old answer, from that pages of Webster's 3rd edition;

Webster

We had a difficult time explaining what made an espantoon an espantoon, until reading that 1970's Sun Paper, newspaper article that asked, "If a Baltimore City officer gave his espantoon to a county officer, would it still be an espantoon?" This single question, sparked the answer. that we've known for years, but had trouble wording our answer into words for a reasonable explanation. By the way, the answer to the Sun paper's question is, No! - If a city officer gave his espantoon to a county officer, his espantoon, would become a nightstick, and would no longer be an espantoon. Here's why. Baltimore Police Department's General Orders, or what today is known as Baltimore Police "Policy," specifically in Policy number 1111, the espantoon is defined as follows; A wooden Baton between 22-25 inches in length, with the striking end of the baton being between 1-1/2 to 1-3/4 inches in diameter, and the grip end being 1-3/8 inches in diameter. For those that might not be too strong in math, 1-1/2 - 1-3/4 inches, is greater than, 1-3/8 inches. Meaning the way we hold and use a baton/nightstick is what makes it an espantoon, other agencies do not hold, or use a baton in this manner, and that is what makes the espantoon unique to a Baltimore Police officer. But, what if the county officer turns it around, won't that make it an espantoon, well in theory it would except, in Baltimore City this can be done and remain within the officer's training, in the county the officer would be going against his, or her training and therefore, not only would it not be an espantoon, but the officer could be charged and lose his or her job. So part of it not just that we turn it around, part of it, is that it is within our agencies rules and our training that we use it this way. Ed Bremer a wood worker that turned espantoons for city police once said, has saved lives, because of the escalation of weapons, the espantoon comes just before the handgun, so by using it it has ended the need to step up to the firearm.  For the record, the espantoon is not just used as a striking weapon, it is also used to jab, and to pry, so one could pry a suspect arms behind their back rather than strike their arms, jabbing in the stomach rather than swinging it like a baseball bat actually works better and ends the need to move up to the firearm, and Mr Bremer said, "this saves lives!"

 

burrell BarrellWoodworkers that Turned Baltimore Espantoons
1939 / 2007

1939 / 1957 – Rev W. Gibbs McKenney - Made BPD Issue - Sold to Howard Uniform - 10,000 hickory 2,000 redwood over 20 yrs

1957 / 1977 – Rev. John D.  Longenecker - Made BPD Issue - Sold to Howard Uniform - 10,000 hickory 2,000 redwood over 20 yrs

1955 / 1979 – Carl Hagen - Made BPD Issue & his own Stick - Sold to Howard Uniform and Officers - 2.000 various wood types over 24 yrs

1974 / 1977 – Edward Bremer - Made his own Stick – Sold to Officers - 300 various wood types over 3 yrs

1977 / 2007 – P/O Joe Hlafka - Made his own Stick - Sold to Officers and Police Supply Shops - 10,000 various wood types over 37 yrs

 

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 Espantoon 18 Feb 1937 Taxi Strike

18 Feb 1937 Taxi Strike
Notice in both places where we can see the espantoon, the officers are holding the Barrel Head out

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Courtesy Robert Oros
Nice espantoon picture showing a nice Baltimore Police Espantoon.
Also notice it is held at the shaft with the Barrel Head / Striking end out

10 July 1979 Espantoon 72

Above is the article that best helped me put my answer into words about what makes an espantoon an espantoon. To read the full article, click on the pic above and it will take you to the article, you can click on it after it opens if you need to zoom in.

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Do our sticks measure up?

The Evening Sun Mon Jul 23 1956 espantoon72

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ESPANTOON NOMENCLATURE72

The blue portion of the espantoon in the above illustration is most often mistaken as the handle of the stick, but is actually the striking end. It is called a, Barrel Head, this most likely comes as the result of an error in pronunciation, as in many blunt force weapons, the striking end is called a, "Burl Head."  As in the Tomahawk, and other such weapons the blunt end can either be added, or carved into the weapon. But here in Baltimore with years of mispronunciation and a slight southern drawl, Burl sounds more like, Barrel. So Burl Head, became Barrel Head. A funny thing to add to this is that shape of the espantoon's burl head is also kind of shaped like a wine barrel, which added to the error. Now, in the way the JEEP a military vehicle that also has ties to Baltimore has a name that was derived from the letters G.P. for General Purpose. G.P. said often enough, and fast enough took on the sound of JEEP and long before it was manufactured and marketed as the JEEP it became JEEP and would have with or without the JEEP's we know been forever called a Jeep, likewise, the Burl Head on the striking end of our espantoon will now and forever be called a Barrel Head

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An illustration with key to show the often mistaken handle, which is in fact the striking end.

Nomenclature to the Espantoon

Nomenclature of the Espantoon

To be clear about the barrel-head and other parts of the espantoon we took a, Joseph "Nightstick Joe" Hlafka, espantoon and painted the various parts using a color key and the nomenclature with color key. Using BLUE for the barrel-head, or burl-head above we can see how the barrel-head could be confused for a handle. We can also see how some old-timers might think it resembles a wine barrel, an believed it could be why it was so named. When I was a young officer being told the parts, the old-timer actually said, "This is called the barrel head, if you look you can see it look like an old wine barrel." If we look at the part painted YELLOW we see what is known as the, "thong groove," this where we weave a leather tong, the groove serves to keep the leather strap/thong from slipping off the stick. Under the, thong groove, we see a part we have painted GREY this aside from being part of the, "thong groove," is known as the, "Ring stop," and is used to prevent the espantoon from sliding through the nightstick ring on an officers belt. Under the, "ring stop," is the "shaft, we left this stained the color of the stick, until we reach the , "Grip" on some sticks the grip, can be turned into the stick, but most often it is just the part of the stick we feel most comfortable catching it at. It could be balanced differently for everyone. In the picture we can see the Thong or strap, this too, is used differently, for me I like to loop it over my ring finger, I have seen some look it over their middle finger, other over their entire hand kind of around all fingers. So we all have to try it different ways to see what is best for us.

Looking at the Pictures below, we can see that by paying attention to what we are doing we can carry an espantoon in a way that keeps the barrel-head at our ready, Tucked under the weak-arm with the grip end extending out toward the officer's back, leaves the grip-end ready for the officer to grab/grip with his/her strong hand in the event that it might be needed. In photo A) we see it is in the officer's strong-hand, with the thong over a finger of the strong hand, if needed, he could turn his hand downward, allowing the stick to slide out under its own weight until it is stopped by the strap. Which would put the stick in his hand by the grip-end with the striking-end out, and at the ready. Picture B) is as described above, tucked under the weak-arm, ready to be grabbed with the strong-hand at the grip-end, which would leave the striking-end again, at the ready. Pictures C) and D) are similar in that the stick is held in the strong-hand, with the thong over a finger, and the stick held at the halfway point, or so, with the striking-end pointing forward, allowing the officer to simply loosen their grip while the stick slides forward until the thong stops it from sliding, and the stick would be ready for use. The important thing about picture D) is that the stick is behind the officer's back, so while he is ready, he is not doing anything that could be seen as a threatening move. We can now see why, these 4 pictures are a nice representation of how an officer can always be ready to protect himself, or the public, but not walk around in a way that might be seen as threatening. 

ESP means to Carry at the ready labled 72i

NOTE; We included a few Non-Baltimore Police pics just to see how other agencies carry their batons/nightsticks, etc. and how when you carry it the way we carry ours, before long when you see others carrying them upside down, and backward, it kinda jumps out to us as odd. This will provide a nice educational moment for those that might be interested and maybe a little humor for those that don't get it or understand.  

esp an toon EDITED

 

In the above picture the letter "A" is marking off the portion of the stick known as the barrel-head. Notice how much cleaner the middle of the barrel-head is when compared to the shaft, especially the part of the shaft we have marked with the letter "B." The section we have marked with the letter "C" has a line at the top and a line at the bottom, this area, we marked as area "C" has a lot of dirty hand marks, but it is not as dirty as the section we have marked with the letter "B." To us, this shows the Officer handled it often down around that section marked "B," which could be an indication that this Officer spun this stick as he walked his post. The constant catch and release of a stick while twirling it would put that portion of the stick in the hand most often. A stick with a light stain and no clear coat will absorb oil from the hands, then pick up and retain the most dirt.  Especially when there is no swivel, and the stick has to be caught and released more often to keep it going while preventing it from tangling up onto itself. Then if we look at the stick between the portion marked "C," we can see the stick was carried most likely in the strong-hand. Some guys learned to spin/twirl in their weak-hand, many just use their strong-hand. So this helps us not only date the stick, but also prove how it was handled, and every hand print strengthens our feelings that this was a Baltimore issued espantoon that was spun by a Baltimore officer, because other agencies do not allow an officer to carry and espantoon, the way a Baltimore police officer would.

Taking a look at the photo before this, the one where the Officer is seen in four variations, we'll see his hand is most often held in the center of the shaft. Now we have to add to the holding of the stick, at the shaft, to what happened when the stick is actually used, either to strike someone, to jab someone, or to pry their arm, perhaps, behind their back or from being wrapped around someone's neck or body. It also works to put someone in an Arm bar, and then to either walk them to the wagon, or to cuff them when they are resisting an officer's attempts to subdue them. As long as it is resisting with an intent to flee, rather than resisting while assaulting the Officer, determines how an officer reacts. This means an officer's actions, are often reactions driven by the subject being arrested.

We'll retake a look at these pics and others to see better what is meant by, "carried at the shaft." if we look a the four picture group, in particular, the second picture, the one marked with the letter "B," we'll see how the stick was most often tucked up under the Officer's weak-arm. Unlike the picture most guys saw, including myself, once the stick was tucked under the weak-arm, the strong-hand reaches up and across to hold the stick at that section earlier marked with the letter "C," in the "A, B, C' picture. My favorite picture is below showing an officer getting back into his car, in it we see his hand at the grip end of the shaft, and the barrel-head extended forward.

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Courtesy Eli Alaman
22 February 1941 Strike, Baltimore Police

Looking at the back of the Officer closest to us, we can see where his Espantoon comes from under his arm confirming that even in the 1930s the "barrel head," end was the striking out. Showing that as far back as the 30's Officer held the stick by the shaft, striking with the Barrel Head.

Strike Baltimore 1930s 2

Courtesy Eli Alaman
22 February 1941 Strike, Baltimore Police

If we look closely at the officer furthest to the right, we can see he has his stick with the Barrel head out, this is how Ken carried it when he was at rest. This allowed him to simply tilt his hand forward allowing the stick to slide down until it was where he wanted it in his hand then grip it so it would be ready in the event someone was closing in on him or his partners. Most often the thong/strap would be looped over his ring finger so when it reached the end of the strap, it would stop and he tightened his grip to hold it at the perfect position for him. With the head forward, if he needed to, he could have quickly used it to jab a suspect that is closing in on him. Jabbing was less violent than Striking. But either striking or jabbing was determined by the actions of the suspect advancing in on an officer. They used to teach, "Reasonable and Prudent," what would a reasonable and prudent person do, and if a person decided they could attack and officer, then of course the officer had every right to defend himself. 

Striking street cleaners on West Lexington Street February 22 1941 Photo by Eli AdalmanCourtesy Eli Alaman
22 February 1941 Strike, Baltimore Police

Spinning espantoonCourtesy Eli Alaman
22 February 1941 Strike, Baltimore Police

Take a look at the officer in the bubble, he is spinning his espantoon on the end of the thong/strap, very nice picture giving the year of the pic (1941) it is nice to see it being done so long ago. This pic was taken by Eli Alaman

Strike Baltimore 1930s 3

Courtesy Eli Alaman
22 February 1941 Strike, Baltimore Police

Taking a look at the motor's officer walking toward the right side of the pic, he is holding the stick at the bottom of the shaft, with the barrel head out front and away from his hand, looking close you can see, he is one of the guys that carved the barrel head so it was no longer convex, a lot of guys would reshape their espantoon to make it unique to them.

oros20000260A

Courtesy Robert Oros
Nice espantoon picture showing a nice Baltimore Police issued espantoon.
Looking more closely we can also see he had a swivel added to the thong.

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ESP held in check dropped shadow 72

This is a most commonly used "Striking-position," it is also a catch, and or release position of holding the stick when spinning/twirling the espantoon.

The Evening Sun Wed Jul 5 1961 pink ribbons and Espantoons 72

1861 Baltimore Police dressed in plain clothes and were distinguished by 
a pink ribbon on their left lapel, and an espantoon in their hands 

CLICK HERE OR ON PIC ABOVE FOR FULL SIZE ARTICLE

The Baltimore Sun Fri Jun 28 1861

This clipping was taken from a 28 June 1861 Sun paper. Notice it says
"New Police force was appointed in the several districts, under military authority..."  
"Newly appointed policemen were designated by a Pink Ribbon, and
they carried the usual Police Club" which in 
Baltimore is the Espantoon

TO SEE FULL PAGE CLICK HERE OR ON THE ABOVE ARTICLE 

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Reverend McKenney and Reverend Longenecker

This is one of the old Baltimore Police Department issued espantoons made between 1937 and 1977 by either Rev W. Gibbs McKenney or the Rev. John D. Longenecker an interesting meeting occurred when after years of the elder reverend [McKenney] turned police sticks for Howard Uniform to be distributed to men of the Baltimore Police, the reverend was set to retire, As such he listed his tools for sale. By the time the second reverend [Longenecker] saw the listing the tools were gone, Reverend McKenney had decided to and already given his tools to a boys school, but he told the second reverend, if he was interested and could gather the necessary tools, he would help get him the Howard Uniform Espantoon Contract, not long after that the two reverends were together with the senior reverend teaching the junior reverend his tricks for turning the Baltimore Espantoon. The younger reverend had been turning chair parts on a lathe since he was a small boy working at his family's furniture-making business in PA (it was his job to turn the rails for the chairs his father, and older brothers were making.) So, he picked up the pattern fast, and best of all he was able to turn them from memory. Well, I am told by a family member that he didn't use a pattern, he just hung the one stick he got from Reverend McKenney on a wall not far from his lathe and they were all pretty close to the same. If I remember correctly the second Reverend said it took him 1 hour to do a stick at first but by the time, he was ready to start, he was able to turn them at the much faster rate of 3 to 4 of them in that same hour.

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ESP means to Carry at the ready labled 72i

We have and will continue to see this picture on the site, look where the stick is most often held, and we'll see why the hand-prints are where they are, and how this is a Baltimore thing. Obviously this doesn't just go for this stick, go get your stick, or the next time you pick up a stick, at a flea market, or antique store, pick it up and look for these tell tail signs. After all no other agency, not only had their officers turn a nightstick around and use the handle as the business end, but if we read our general orders we see several lines describing the various batons allowed in use by the department, when they describe the espantoon it is described as follows. espantoon — wooden baton between 22-25 inches in length, with the striking end of the baton being between 1 1/2 - 1 3/4 inches in diameter, and the grip end being 1-3/8 inches in diameter. This baton has color restrictions and shall only be coated in an Oak, Ash, Maple, Hickory or Rosewood finish. Decorations are prohibited.

NOTE: We are not saying we won't find marks where officers from other agencies didn't carry their batons at the shaft, what we are saying is, in most cases where the stick is not a straight stick, and does have a handle, the handle will not be as clean as the Baltimore Espantoon's Barrel-head or Burl-head.

To better understand what makes an Espantoon, an Espantoon, we have to take into consideration, what is the different between, a nightstick carried in New York, Chicago, Philly or by any other police officer in any other police department anywhere in this country. Basically, other than Chicago that had a unique turning pattern to their baton’s handle, that could help identify it as a Chicago stick. Baltimore may not have a pattern for optional officer self purchased sticks, the issued sticks were the same design from 1937 to 1992. Before 1937, the sticks were not much different, the craftsmanship was slightly better looking. Put either the older versions or the more modern version on a table with other batons from around the world, and a Baltimore baton could easily be picked from the crowd of sticks.

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Below are Some Baltimore Police Issued Espantoons

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1920's Baltimore Police Issue

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Issued Stick 1937 - 1977
Rev. W. Gibbs McKenney & Rev. John D. Longenecker

Stick 1

Issued Stick 1937 - 1977
Rev. W. Gibbs McKenney & Rev. John D. Longenecker

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Issued Stick 1937 - 1977
Rev. W. Gibbs McKenney & Rev. John D. Longenecker

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Issued Stick 1937 - 1977
Rev. W. Gibbs McKenney & Rev. John D. Longenecker 

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Issued Stick 1937 - 1977
Rev. W. Gibbs McKenney & Rev. John D. Longenecker 

Espantoon

Courtesy David Eastman

Look at the officer's espantoon seen on the right side of this pic, and notice how it is carried, held in his right hand with the thong ran through his fingers, and the barrel head out as he is gripping it by the shaft of the espantoon. This pic is taken in the early 1900's but we can clearly see he carries it the way it is carried today, indicating the striking end back then, was as it was in the 1960's and 1970's when Ken's uncles walked a beat in Baltimore, and the 1980/90's when Ken walked a beat in Baltimore. The striking end in Baltimore would be considered the handle to all other jurisdictions, and if other departments used it the way Baltimore did, it was only Baltimore that had it in the officer's general orders that the striking end was the wider end of the baton, the handle in Baltimore is the thinner end, the end known here as the "Shaft."

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Issued Stick 1937 - 1977
Rev. W. Gibbs McKenney & Rev. John D. Longenecker 
This has one edge shaved flat so it would stay in place without popping out every time we turn a sharp corner or hit a pothole. The flat spot helps keep it in place when it's forced between the dashboard padding and the transmission hump.

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Issued Stick 1937 - 1977
Rev. W. Gibbs McKenney & Rev. John D. Longenecker
There was a time in the mid 50's that officers would shave the Barrel Head of their Espantoon
Taking it from convex to flat/straight then add or re-cut grooves in the new Barrelhead 

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Issued Stick 1937 - 1977
Rev. W. Gibbs McKenney & Rev. John D. Longenecker 
 This is another case of someone attempting to straighten the convex, "Barrel-Head" 

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Issued Stick 1987 

This was issued to me on 17 June 1987 when I was hired and sworn in

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 Issued Stick 1937 - 1977
Rev. W. Gibbs McKenney & Rev. John D. Longenecker 

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Issued Stick 1937 - 1977
Rev. W. Gibbs McKenney & Rev. John D. Longenecker 

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Jim Brock
Perfection Collection
Rev. W. Gibbs McKenney & Rev. John D. Longenecker Model
Circa 2015 

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Rev. W. Gibbs McKenney & Rev. John D. Longenecker

Stick 2

Non-Issued Stick 1937 - 1977
Rev. W. Gibbs McKenney & Rev. John D. Longenecker

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Carl Hagen turned sold through Howard Uniform
circa 1965

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Carl Hagen

This is an early Carl Hagen Stick, it came while he was still turning them to the size of an issue stick, and isn't too far off of the standard issue stick, he just added a few things to make it stand out from the issue stick, the barrel-head is a little over sized and it is turned from an oak. 

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P/O Raymond Wheatley holding a Carl Hagen stick, notice how Carl rounded the tops of his sticks, this is a nice old stick. Also, notice how Officer Wheatley picked up a small child to help him better see a parade that he had attended, but couldn't enjoy over the crowd. Officer Wheatley not only gave the kid a lift, bought him a cup of soda too. 

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Carl Hagen
1955 - 1979

This is one of Carl's first unique designs, it was done solely by him and became a popular design from his sticks. In the next pic, we'll see Officer Ray Wheatley holding a Carl Hagen Espantoon, it is more of an issue cut, but with a modern (at the time) cut, the cut that ended up being refined into the sticks we saw turned by Ed Bremer and Joe Hlafka.

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Jim Brock
Perfection Collection
Carl Hagen Model
Circa 2015

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Jim Brock
Perfection Collection Thin Blue Line Stick
Carl Hagen Model
Circa 2015 

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Prior to Issued Sticks 1954 - 1960
Rev. W. Gibbs McKenney & Carl Hagen

At some point when McKenney had retired from turning sticks, he had donated his lathe and tools to a boy's school out west, and before meeting Reverend Longenecker, McKenney he had met Carl Hagen and showed him how to turn sticks, for whatever reason, Carl turned some sticks for Howard Uniform, he just didn't get the 500+ stick a year contracts from Howard Uniform that the Reverends McKenney & Longenecker received.

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Carl Hagen
1955 - 1979 

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Jim Brock
Perfection Collection Lignum vitae #001 Stick
Lignum vitae is on top 10 lists of hardest woods

depending on the list it is either 2nd or 4th
One might be how dense the wood is, while the other might be
how dense the guy/gal is that is trying to spelling Lignum Vitae
Joe Hlafka Model
Circa 2015 

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Ed Bremer
1974 - 1977

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Jim Brock
Edward Bremer Model
Circa 2015  

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1977 - 2007
P/O Joe Hlafka 

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Joe Hlafka

1987 - I bought this from Joe Hlafka direct, apparently someone ordered it, paid half down and before it was done they found their stick and told Joe, they didn't need it anymore, could he sell it to someone for the remainder of the balance, I was the lucky guy that talked to Joe about a stick, and he gave me the stick for $12.00. I have replaced the thong twice, had it, "I say" stolen once, the guy that took it, called it, "found". How you can find an espantoon in the trunk of a patrol car, and not think it must belong to someone. Not to mention DRISCOLL is written around the stick in blue sharpie by the Ring Stop - Anyway, it is a 30 plus-year-old stick. BTW I stopped the kid as he was going out to his post, so I loan it to him for the shift, and told him to get it back to me, "in my hand," the next day. I couldn't send him on the streets without a stick.

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I Turned this Myself 

1990 - I put the extra groove on the shaft because after carrying it for a day or two I realized the stick felt good, weight was nice, but the shaft was too think to hold on while swinging it, So I taped the thong to the barrel-head with Duct tape, and put the stick back on the lathe and shaved a hand-grip in the shaft. After shaving the shaft to a comfortable grip, I was done, pulled the tape, and it was a spinner, or umm, I mean a winner, 

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Irish Shillelagh

This is to point out the striking part of this weapon, that blunt looking rock, or fist shaped portion at the end of this weapon, and any blunt force weapon is called the "Burl-Head". On the Espantoon the blunt striking end resembles, and is often mistaken for the weapon's handle is called the "Barrel-Head." Most likely stemming from a misunderstanding caused by Baltimore's southern drawl, or bad "accent," causing a listener to misunderstand what a speaker may have said, Burl-head to thinking the speaker said, "Barrel-head." In 1987 when an old timer told me, he even pointed to the shape and, said, this is because this looks like an old wine barrel. Truth be told, it wasn't a barrel at all, it's a burl.

Carl Hagen 1957 77s

Barrel Head

This is the Barrel-head of one of Carl Hagen's early sticks - This Rounded off top end was exclusive to Carl Hagen, and was found more on the West side of Baltimore than the East. The East-side Espantoons saw more of a two or three tiered layers each with a hard edge that sat atop the espantoon like a crown on top the barrel head end of the stick. If we look at Carl's earlier stuff, he had a two or three-tiered top edge also, but it wasn't a hard edge. Carl had a super soft, smooth transition going tier to tier on the barrel head.

Ed Bremer 1974 77s

Barrel Head

This is the Barrel-head from one of Ed Bremer's early sticks, he put what he called a "Nib" on the top of all his Barrel head. Mr. Bremer felt he saved lives, both of Officers and Suspects because as he once said, "Nightsticks Save Lives, Preventing Officers from a need to escalate from hand-to-hand combat to the use of a firearm." The faster we can get a suspect into cuffs the safer it is for both the officer and the suspect. This stick is turned from Lignum vitae, a wood that was banned by the department as it was too heavy, hard and they felt could cause serious injury or death.

 7 grooves Espantoon

The Barrel-head of Baltimore's Issued Espantoon 

Interesting Theory, The last design of Baltimore's issued espantoon came when Reverend John D. Longenecker started turning them for Howard Uniform in 1957. If we look. we'll see the Reverend turned seven grooves in the barrel-head of his version of our espantoon. Some officers at the time of the change took notice and while there is no proof, and it can not be verified, they felt it was because we only had seven districts at the time. In 1957 we only had seven districts as we didn't get the Southeastern District until 1959, and the Western district was shut down in 1951 and didn't reopen until around the same time Southeast District opened. So for many years we only had 7 districts. If we go back far enough we'll see we started with just 4 districts, and that number fluctuated several times over the years. So the number of districts we have had throughout our department's history has been fluid. But at the time Reverend Longenecker started turning the espantoon, we had just seven districts. Could that be the reason he turned the seven grooves into the barrel-head of his version of Baltimore's espantoon, or was it just coincidence?

 

Our Espantoon Collection

 

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BALTIMORE POLICE DEPARTMENT TRAINING BULLETIN

Guidelines EDWARD T. NORRIS POLICE COMMISSIONER

December 12, 1987

Revised / Reviewed - August 2002 Vol. 12, No. 10

ESPANTOON HISTORY The espantoon according to Webster’s Dictionary is: “in Baltimore; a policeman’s nightstick.” The term is a derivative of the word “Spontoon” that dates back to the weapon and symbol of authority the Officers of the Roman Legions carried.. In 1784 Baltimore appointed paid police officers. From that time until the middle 1960's when the department switched to motorized patrol units the sight of the officer “walking the beat” was a commonplace reassurance. One of the most unique elements of a foot patrol officer in any large East Coast American City was their ability to twirl the “nightstick” until it literally danced. Obviously then, as now, the espantoon is a defensive weapon. The purpose of twirling the espantoon was multifold. The days before the portable two-way radio, the officer was alone and the “twirling” created and protected a “personal zone.” Another benefit of twirling the espantoon was that a familiarity was gained with the “stick” that developed confidence carrying the espantoon. The espantoon was also used for communications. A rapid tapping of the espantoon signaled a warning to others or a call for help. A flip of the espantoon, falling free of the hand striking the concrete, created a unique “ring.” Even today foot patrol officers use this technique to signal each other. It is extremely effective on quiet nights. Even when “tapped” in a large crowd, usually another officer is the only one to notice. Training Guideline Vol. 12, No. 10 Page - 2 - Departmental regulations allow an officer to substitute a personally purchased espantoon for the one issued by the department, provided the substitute is similar in size, composition and design to the issued equipment. The departmental issued espantoon is 22" long by 1 1/4" in diameter and is solid wood. There is a handle on one end with a groove to attach a leather strap or thong. The thong extends from the groove to the bottom of the espantoon.

COME-ALONG AND HANDCUFFING ASSIST TECHNIQUE There are a variety of uses for the espantoon as a come-along or to assist in the handcuffing of an arrestee. Most are too complicated to describe briefly here. A key element to all of these techniques is for the officer to retain control of the espantoon at all times. The espantoon is primarily used as a lever to add power (torque) to the officers hand and arm movement. The speed of the top of the espantoon is essential. Bring the espantoon (with one hand) in a cocked position and strike forward in a slashing move. Make sure the wrist is snapped forward to accelerate the top two inches of the espantoon for maximum power. Do not snap back after impact. Follow through across your body. If a second immediate strike is required, deliver it in a back hand method, again snapping the wrist for maximum power.

JABBING AREAS AND TECHNIQUE To jab an assailant with the espantoon is an alternative method of stopping an assault to gain control. Jabbing is especially effective in close quarter confrontations such as a small hallway or in a large crowd. This would include any situation where “swinging” the espantoon would not be effective and/or would endanger others. The most effective target area for using a jab is the stomach area. A jab with the espantoon when carried in a single hand short reach position, is very effective against a sudden assault. A jab in the single hand long reach position has limited applications, such as keeping a subject or assailant at bay. The most effective jabbing technique is utilizing both hands. One hand close to the top of the espantoon while having the other hand at the bottom; gun away from the assailant. The technique is identical to using a bayonet on a rifle. Step forward to the assailant thrusting the end of the espantoon in the stomach area while lifting upwards. Both maneuvers are done with power. Training Guideline Vol. 12, No. 7 Page - 3 - Historically, most officers have made or purchased their own espantoons. While all are required to be made entirely of wood and similar to the size of the issued model, each one is unique. The variations of wood tones, size and shapes make them very personal. Often the same espantoon is carried for an entire career regardless of rank attained or duty assignments. The espantoon has sometimes become a family heirloom and passed on to younger generations of officers. The term “nightstick” was derived from the fact that officers were required to carry the espantoon during the “night-time” hours i.e.:4 x 12 and 12 x 8 shifts. It was optional during daylight hours. Police Officers are encouraged to have their espantoons with them whenever on duty. In the escalation of force, the use of espantoon is a step below the service revolver. The espantoon gives the officer the option and a greater degree of safety in the use of force. If the assailant is overpowering the officer’s attempt to defend himself, the espantoon can be utilized effectively to gain control. If the espantoon is left in the car or has otherwise been disregarded, the options for self-defense are severely limited..

DEFENSIVE USE The proper method for carrying the espantoon is in a “short reach” position in the weak (non gun) hand with the index or middle finger through the leather thong. When interviewing one or more potentially hostile suspects, the espantoon may be placed under one arm. This enables the officer to utilize both hands to write information.

STRIKING AREAS AND TECHNIQUES Often the question is asked, “Do I strike with my strong hand?” Most officers will use their strong hand because it is a natural tendency in high stress situations, but your weak hand is also acceptable. If you spin or twirl your espantoon, use the hand that will be utilized for striking. The twirling of the espantoon will enable you to learn its exact length. This knowledge will increase familiarity and confidence as an extension of your arm. Care and consideration should be given when and where you should “twirl the stick.” The espantoon should not be spun in close areas to avoid the possibility of injury to others or property damage. In some situations the espantoon may appear better left in the ring. If the espantoon is too heavy or feels uncomfortable, the officer should obtain a lighter espantoon. The power of the espantoon is developed by the speed not the mass. An espantoon that is too heavy for the officer will be ineffective. Whenever an officer is forced to strike a person, he must only hit as hard as necessary to stop an assailant in an effort to gain control to effect an arrest.

Training Guideline Vol. 12, No. 7 Page - 4 - The best target areas are the legs. The point of impact should be on the outside rear quadrant of the upper leg about four inches above the knee. That is where the common peroneal nerve branches off from the sciatic nerve. Striking this area will cause an involuntary bending reflex action of the leg. In a sympathetic nerve reaction the other leg will also “buckle” causing the assailant to fall to the ground. On top of the calf has the same stunning effect. Do not strike for the knee joint which can cause permanent damage to bones, tendons and muscles. While the legs are the best target areas, an officer is not limited to the legs. Any strike to the head must be avoided. Courts have held that a strike to the head with an impact weapon is tantamount to using deadly force. To strike with the espantoon an officer should hold same in the “long reach” position. The hand should be at the base with the index finger through the leather thong. The striking point should be the top two inches of the upper section. These methods leave the hands free and gives immediate access to the espantoon. These techniques are not offensive but helps the officer to control a situation better and with more confidence. If the officer is in a situation where the escalation of force seems imminent; drawing the espantoon from the ring tends to be offensive and aggravates the situation. When attempting to control a person or a situation, neither “slapping” the free end of the “stick” into an open hand nor pointing the espantoon in a threatening manner is advisable. These actions provoke people and place the officer in greater peril.

 

 

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1111 Batons and Impact Weapons 1 721111 Batons and Impact Weapons 2 721111 Batons and Impact Weapons 3 72

 

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POLICE INFORMATION

Copies of: Your Baltimore Police Department Class Photo, Pictures of our Officers, Vehicles, Equipment, Newspaper Articles relating to our department and or officers, Old Departmental Newsletters, Lookouts, Wanted Posters, and or Brochures. Information on Deceased Officers and anything that may help Preserve the History and Proud Traditions of this agency. Please contact Retired Detective Kenny Driscoll.

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Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll 

39 Minutes of Terror

Saturday, 14 March 2020 13:45

Baltimore City Police

 

39 Minutes of Terror
LOMBARD & CAREY

Hail of sniper bullets in 1976 changed five lives forever. The incident forever changed the Baltimore Police Department One Officer dead four others shot and critically wounded A detailed account of the incident from official reports including the time line of each minute as this unfolded. Official BPD reports, photographs from public domain and news articles will give the full story as never seen or heard before. With the guidance, assistance and help of Lieutenant Joseph Key who was 1930 unit that faithful night to later assume 2501 Command Post, Incident Commander. The Command Post Unit #2501 once activated becomes the voice and authority of the Baltimore Police Commissioner. A transcript of each BPD Radio channel will be posted in its entirety. Each and every word that was spoken over BPD communications will be presented to give insight as to exactly was taking place that night.

PROLOGUE

I provided Bill Hackley with the materials regarding Lombard and Carey and the inception of the Quick Response Teams because I had them for thirty plus years and, like me, they were just getting older and not doing anybody much good. What good can these materials do? They can serve as a reminder that preserving the status quo in the dangerous business of police work can get cops killed. All of the materials concerning Lombard and Carey are a matter of public record. The documents concerning the establishing of the Quick Response Teams are not public records, but, since I wrote them and have provided them to countless other agencies, I am putting them out there. Their only relevance now is to history. The reader will note that they are signed by the, then, Acting Commanding Officer of Tactical, who believed that any correspondence from his unit should be signed by him. As long as the program was approved, it didn’t make much difference to me whose signature was on it. Regardless, they document the founding of SWAT operations in the Baltimore Police Department at a time when moving ahead with new concepts was like pulling good teeth out of a really pissed off Grizzly Bear’s mouth–a chancy business at best.

Some of the heroes in the command structure at the beginning of that process were Bishop Robinson and Joe Bolesta. Of particular note on the operational level, then and later, was Lieutenant Darryl Duggins (1901 in the City Wide Communications Tape Transcript). Duggins was a sometimes recalcitrant, always plain spoken, always forge ahead and damn the "brass," brilliant leader and implementer of the structural minutia that makes a group of diverse and resistive personalities into a cohesive unit. Darryl was a Marine at Chosin Reservoir. Nothing else needs to be said.

How do the documents concerning the founding of the QRT relate to Lombard and Carey? The one led to the other, or, rather, significantly sped up the other. In the months just prior to Lombard and Carey, Bishop Robinson, who was Chief of Patrol, convened several meetings of Tactical supervisors and the Commanding Officer of Tactical, Joe Bolesta. Bolesta was, and is, a more refined version of Duggins; i.e., a man that had the fortitude to stand up to command, but could do it without making unnecessary enemies that could hurt

his goals and those of his unit. I was a sergeant in Tactical at the time (1930 and 2501 in the City Wide Communications Tape Transcript) and was assigned the task of writing the general order for the resolution of sniper, barricade, and hostage situations. I completed that assignment by January of 1976. With Captain Bolesta’s permission, I began training my squad in SWAT procedures. We worked mostly on our time with equipment we bought and used tactical procedures I had acquired from military tactics manuals, Los Angeles SWAT (In operation, by contrast, since the late 60's), New York SWAT, and other similar programs. We did all of the physical training on our own time, although the effort was something like filling up a balloon with mud. In February of ‘76, Captain Bolesta sent my squad to the FBI SWAT school. On Good Friday, April 16, 1976, my squad was the only squad in the Baltimore Police Department with any SWAT training. On that evening John Earl Williams decided to impress his girlfriend by killing a few cops.

Shortly before 7:00 p.m. on Good Friday the temperature was above 90 degrees. TAC had been redeployed to the area around Lombard and Carey because Williams had called and told Communications that he planned to kill cops. Williams was a nothing person whose girlfriend (in his mind only) had told him to get lost. His attempt to impress her landed him in prison, where, the last I heard, he has had many relationships much more "fulfilling" than the one he used as an excuse for his madness. I’m sure his role in prison is the achievement pinnacle of his pathetic life.

Williams had briefly been in the National Guard and had received some training in weapons and tactics from them. He had also stolen some equipment from the Guard and had amassed a large quantity of ammunition and long guns. Specifically, that night he was shooting a 300 Winchester magnum, an 8mm Magnum, a 30-06, a 12 gauge shotgun, and perhaps others. After ingesting some PCP, he began his shooting spree shortly before 7:00 p.m.. His first targets were TAC officers, who, ironically, became his targets because of their redeployment to the area in response to his threats.

As for the rest of the story, the transcript of the tapes and photos will tell it. All of the officers were shot within the first nine minutes of the inception of the incident. They were removed from the line of fire within forty minutes and the

incident was over in less than an hour. There were numerous heroes on that night, starting with, of course, Jimmy Halcomb, a decorated Marine Vietnam veteran. A hero not just because he gave his life, but because he, like nearly two hundred other cops, responded to the call of cops taking fire. He and the officers who were wounded (Jimmy Brennan, Art Kennel, Neal Splain, Calvin Mencken, Roland Miller) were trying to stop Williams and did what cops do by profession and calling–they ran into the mouth of the dragon when others were running away. Also, off duty Homicide Detective, Nick Giangrazo (forgive the spelling), who ran from a position of safety across Lombard Street into the killing zone to help put Jimmy Brennan in a van and drive him from the scene. Brennan had been dragged behind the van by his friend and fellow Western District Officer, Doug Bryson, during a hail of gunfire. He had lain there bleeding from the time the incident began, but was kept alive by Bryson who had applied direct pressure to Brennan's gaping, gushing wounds in his elbow and side. Then there was Mike Hurm from TAC and Frank Stallings from the Western who pulled Halcomb out during the barrage of cover fire. It was, unfortunately, too late because Officer Halcomb had died instantly, but their effort was no less courageous. The reality was that all of the officers who responded that night did so selflessly and without concern for their personal safety and with the one overriding motivation of helping brother officers.

The entire incident lasted a little more than thirty-five minutes, but its repercussions still linger through today. I was scheduled to start training other TAC squads in SWAT tactics on Monday, April 19th. Lombard and Carey had been the first incident where members of the, then, nonexistent QRT had been deployed. Members of my squad were assigned as observers for the counter-sniper, an evacuation team, a gas deployment team, and entry team for 1303 Lombard after Williams was forced out by the cover fire fusillade. Those roles had been learned and practiced primarily on their own time. Lombard and Carey would lay the groundwork for ensuring that training and equipping the QRT became a mandated, on-duty, part of the Department’s response to sniper, barricade, and hostage situations.

There were many flaws in the Department’s response to Lombard and Carey. Communications’ discipline was practically nonexistent. Officers gave conflicting information concerning the location of Williams, which resulted in

officers firing on officers. Contradictory information concerning the removal of wounded officers resulted in Jimmy Halcomb being left where he fell for over twenty minutes. Again, Halcomb was killed immediately, but that didn’t change the fact that his location should have been identified and a rescue effort mounted much more quickly. The command post, 2501, was implemented and manned only by a rookie sergeant who gave all of the orders until 1303 Lombard had been declared secure by the entry team. Two colonels were on the scene, but neither gave orders, responded and/or stayed at the command post until after Williams came out.

Over the years there has been much criticism concerning the handling of Lombard and Carey. The main reason why it occurred the way it did, however, was the failure by the Department to recognize the need for a specialized team and disciplined response to such incidents well before the efforts of Bishop Robinson and Joe Bolesta. After all, there had been many similar incidents around the country and several such incidents in Baltimore prior to April 16th. Old line thinking, petty interdepartmental rivalries, and a drag-them-out-by-their-hair mentality dictated the entire response spectrum to situations like Lombard and Carey. I wish that I could say that Good Friday, April 16, 1976 changed all of that, but it would take many years for any true change to occur and, even then, not a whole hearted change. In addition to honoring the cops that were there that night, the posting of these materials is meant to stand as a stark reminder of what can happen when a police department loses, or, more accurately, never finds its ability to give the same weight to issues vital to officer safety as it does to its crime reduction mission. In the past crime reduction has trumped all other concerns. Today, the certain eventuality of terrorist attacks in this country should compel the Baltimore Police Department to ensure that all of its officers are well prepared to meet such challenges. It is an absolute that Baltimore Police Officers will thrust themselves into the breach, with or without proper training, with or without appropriate guidelines, and with or without necessary equipment. They will do so and some will pay the price like Jimmy Halcomb, Jimmy Brennan, Roland Miller, Art Kennel, Neal Splain, and Calvin Mencken did on that hot night in April. It is incumbent on the Baltimore Police Department to provide them the tools, guidelines, and training they will need. The tragedy of Lombard and Carey demands that.

Finally, I didn’t know what I was going to do with the documents that I had until I came across Bill Hackley’s website. I was much impressed by his sole dedication to memorializing the Baltimore Police Department’s rich history and the huge amount of work he puts into the effort. Although retired from active service, his exemplary service to the Department and its officers continues today. I can think of no better way to have the story of Lombard and Carey told than to entrust it to Bill Hackley. I know he will do it justice.

Charles J. Key
Lieutenant, Baltimore Police Department (Retired)

po Halcomb

Baltimore City Police Officer Jimmy Dale Halcomb age 31, E.O.W. April 16, 1976, an 8 year veteran of the Western District and a former Marine. He was married, the father of two children and his widow Angela was expecting their 3rd. child within the month. His badge number is 293 and he was the first BPD Officer to die in the line of duty in 1976. - Jimmy died on Good Friday and his killer was born on Christmas Day, 18 years earlier.

officers wounded

Officer James A. Brennan, 25 years old assigned Western District, wounds on the left side and right shoulder. - Officer Neil C. Splain, 28 years old assigned Southern District, shotgun wounds in the face. - Officer Roland W. Miller, 23 years old assigned Southern District, shotgun wounds left arm. - Officer Calvin L. Mencken, Jr. Assigned to the Southern District, shotgun wounds in the face. - Officer Arthur E. Kennell,Jr. shotgun wounds in the face and eyes. - Civilian: George Weaver 23 years old, bullet wound in the hand.
Scan9

This sketch is slightly off scale as you can clearly see in the aerial shots. The BCFD house should be where the two cars are sketched. As officers reported on the air that they were on the roof of the firehouse and were looking down on where the injured officers were pinned down.

Officer Jimmy Halcomb and the other officers were shot within six minutes of the start of this incident, avery warm evening with 90+ degrees at the time of this operation.

When cover fire was ordered for the attempt for officers to reach the injured officers 487 rounds were fired in sixty seconds as determined by reports written by each officer involved.

Devider

Police Department

Baltimore, Maryland
16, April 1976

TRANSCRIPT

City-Wide Dispatcher

450Mhz

Time:18:59:10

CAR: 1933. We have shots fired.

DIS: Unit in reference to the shots being fired. No. the unit with the shots fired.

CAR: 1933 in the unit block of South Carey, we got somebody shooting at us.

DIS: Unit South Carey. 10-4

SIMULCAST

DIS: Unit Block of South Carey,1933 says someone is discharging firearms at that location. Unit block of south Carey.

FT: Foxtrot responding.

DIS: Okay. 1933 are they shooting at you.

CAR: 10-4, they shot the radiator out of the car.

(ALERT TONE)

DIS: All units be advised they are shooting at 1933 car, unit block of south Carey SIGNAL 13, time 1900

CAR:__?___ responding to South Carey.

CAR: 1933- advise them not to come up Carey Street. They're gonna get shot.

DIS: all units all units 10-6 1933 only.

CAR: Tell them not to come up Carey , they're gonna get shot.

DIS: Don't come up Carey Street.

SIMULCAST

DIS: All units be advised do not go up Carey Street. Do not go on the unit block of Carey.

CAR: Keep 'em off Lombard. 1901 in reference.

19:01:00

DIS: Go ahead.

CAR: Ascertain if 1933 can operate his vehicle and if so, get it out of that area.

DIS: 1933

CAR: 1912 in reference.

DIS: Go ahead

CAR: Be advised the third floor house on the corner. The man is armed with a shotgun.
DIS: Third floor house on the corner Unit block Carey?

CAR: __?__ hundred block of South Carey.

DIS: Cruising Patrol Eleven.

CAR: C.P. 11.

DIS: Okay you respond to the unit block South Carey, don't go on Carey Street at this time.

CAR: Negative on Carey Street 10-4, sir.

DIS: OK

CAR: 1914. Advise Fox Trot it sounds like rifle fire.

DIS: All units 10-6 1914, go ahead.

CAR: Sir, advise Foxtrot it sounds like rifle fire.

FT: Fox Trot OK, we'll leave the area.

DIS: OK, I got rifle fire, is that the unit block South Carey on the corner; can you give me a house number or something better.

CAR: --?---?---- House.

DIS: The third floor the corner house. Can you give me the corner? What's it, Northwest, Southwest corner.

CAR: Southwest corner second house from the corner.

DIS: Southwest corner, second house.

SIMULCAST

DIS: Ok, in reference to this shooting, the subject is in the second house from the corner, Southwest corner. He's on the third floor. He may have a rifle. Fox Trot use caution.

19:02:30

FT: Fox Trot OK we're a good distance away, and we still have it under observation.

DIS: 10-4

CAR: Cruising Patrol Eleven --?--. CP 11.

CAR: 1924---have our units switch to City-Wide so we can control --?--.

DIS: KGA to unit 9

19:03:10

CAR: 1919- we still got gun shots. Have them get these people in the house.

CAR: Cruising Patrol 11.

CAR: Have all units clear these people off the street.

DIS: KGA to unit 9.

CAR: 1912 to Fox Trot. Leave the area.

FT: Fox Trot OK.

CAR: CP 11.

CAR: 1912

SIMULCAST

DIS: Attention all cars, information from Unit 9, stay out of the Unit Block of South Carey Street. Try to get a location.

CAR: 10-33, 10-33.

19:04:00

DIS: Go ahead.

CAR: 793- My partner's hit down here. Get me an Ambo.

DIS: What location?

CAR: Please get me the ambo down here now.

CAR: 10-33

DIS: Where's 793 at?

CAR: Unit South Carey Street; Unit South Carey.

DIS: OK.

Car: C.P. 11- Ascertain where they want us to move into for a command post?

DIS: KGA to Unit 9.

Car: Unit block of South Carey, pedestrians are still coming in this area.

DIS: All units 10-6 on this channel in reference to the 10-33. 10-6. 793 can you give us an exact location?

CAR: Yes Sir, right in front of the fire house on Carey Street. Don't let these come in here. And if you could have some of these police return fire to that guy so we can get this officer out of here.

CAR: 1912 with a 10-33. 1912.

19:05:10

DIS: 1912.

CAR: Be advised Sir the subject is on the third floor and it's the second house in from the store. There's a pocketbook on the front steps and information from the neighbors, this guy's got arsenal in there. Better get E.V.U. over there.

DIS: Ok, see if you can ascertain from a neighbor or somebody, get us an exact address.

SIMULCAST

Attention all cars in reference to Carey Street. We have second house from the store. He's in the third floor: he's heavily armed.

CAR: 1944.

DIS: 1944.

CAR: Can you have a unit respond to----ah, correction, the truck. The sniper equipment on it---ah, stand by. I'll give you a location later.

CAR: Is the E.V.U. unit responding?

DIS: Cruising Patrol 11's on the way; where do you want Cruising Patrol 11 to go?

CAR: 1930- Did anybody establish a command post?

19:06:50

DIS: KGA to Unit 9.

CAR: 1901

DIS: 1901, can you set up a Command Post?

CAR: 10-4, when I arrive on the scene. But in the meantime can you have 1910, 20 and 30 cordon off the area, don their jump suits and stand by?

CAR 1930; I have set up a Command Post at Baltimore and Carey, a block away from it; have CP 11, 10-11 me here. We're moving people back.

DIS: Cruising Patrol 11.

CAR: 10-4 Baltimore and Carey.

CAR: I'm on the eastern side of Carey Street at Baltimore and Carey, a block from the shots.

LOMBARD CAREY2a

CAR: 1919.

DIS: Go ahead.

CAR: Advise those units not to walk down Carey. Gunshot fire, is coming straight up Carey. Clear shot.

DIS: The Command Post is at Baltimore and Carey, East of Carey.

CAR: 10-4.

SIMULCAST

DIS: ALL Units be advised the Command Post is at Baltimore and Carey, east of Carey. Do not go on Carey.

CAR: 1912- have all units in the Carey and Baltimore Street area 10-26.

19:08:00

DIS: Ok, cruising patrol 11 be advised that officer is supposed to be hit in the chest. He's on Carey Street. 793 unit. Ambulance is responding.

CAR: 10-4 Do you wish us at Baltimore and Carey?

DIS: They want you at Baltimore and Carey, East of Carey; do not go on Carey at this time.

CAR: 10-4 Baltimore and Carey.

CAR: 1930-have all units stand by until CP 11 reaches the Command Post. Seal off the perimeter, we've moved the perimeter back from Baltimore Street and Carey; Have them do the same thing down on Hollins Street.

19:08:30

DIS: The Tactical supervisor is on the scene and they're keeping the people and the officers away from the unit block of Carey.

CAR: Can you get the street lights off down here? Get the street lights out.

(ALERT TONE)

DIS: All units on the scene at Baltimore and Carey or in the vicinity, switch 10-26. Stay on the City-Wide channel.

19:08:50

CAR: 1914. Can I lateral with 1930?

CAR: KGA advise all units the subject is also firing into the rear of the building.

CAR: 1930 is 10-4. 1930 to 1910.

CAR: 1910.

CAR: Do you have any units that can seal off the back of that building?

CAR: I have several units right here on Lombard Street and they can't move. They're not in a position to get out of the way of the guy's gunfire.

CAR: 10-4. I have Baltimore and Carey Streets sealed off. If you can insure the back of the house, we've established a perimeter up here. The Command Post will be on the Eastern side of Carey at Baltimore and Carey.

CAR: 10-4. I am at Stockton and Carey.

CAR: You 10-4 on the Command Post?

CAR: 10-9 the location.

CAR: The east side of Baltimore Street, At Baltimore and Carey.

CAR: 10-4

CAR: 830 in reference to this call.

CAR: 926- 10-33

DIS: Go ahead.

CAR: Give me an ambo.

DIS: Unit with the 10-33 only, please.

CAR: 926,-I'm shot Get me an ambo.

DIS: Where are you at, 926?

CAR: In the rear of Lombard Street, behind where the sniper is.

DIS: Rear of Lombard near Carey?

(ALERT TONE- SIMULCAST)

DIS: All units stay out of range of the house, this subject is armed with a high powered rifle. Stay out of range the unit block of south Carey Street. We have several officers who have been shot at this time. Do not respond to Baltimore and Carey unless you're going to the command Post or nearby.

19:10:40

CAR: 830

DIS: 830

CAR: I'm on the second floor of the fire house here. And the suspect is I believe at 1303 West Lombard Street on the third floor, the house with the third floor window open.

DIS: Ok, 830, give me that address again.

CAR: 1303 West Lombard Street. I think that's where he's firing from. I'm on the second floor of the firehouse on Carey Street.

(SIMULCAST)

DIS: Ok, all units be advised- we have information from 830 this subject may possibly be at 1303 West Lombard in the rear, third floor.

CAR: 1914.

DIS: 1914.

CAR: 1914 to 1930.

CAR: 1930 go ahead.

CAR: Sarge, we're directly across the street, there's an abandoned building; when CP 11gets here, you may send him up here. It'll be a clear shot if we have to take this guy out.

CAR: 10-4. Give me an exact location of where you are?

CAR: I have no address, I'm in the back; I'm staying out of the --ah, out of the line of fire here. I'm directly across the street.

CAR: 901, 901, 901 to the Command Post.

DIS: Ok, the unit for the Command Post.

CAR: 901 car.

DIS: You're not at the Command Post, are you?

CAR: Negative. I'm at Carey and Lombard. Have one of those men with gas, report to Carey and Lombard; we may not be able to put gas in this house.

CAR: 1930 10-4. We have the CP here, we're setting up. We'll send it down by foot. I'm gonna leave the CP, the cruising patrol here.

CAR: 10-4

DIS: Ok, 901 can you give me a safe location for an ambulance to stand by there near there?

CAR: 10-4

DIS: 901 go ahead.

CAR: Have an ambo meet me at Carey and Lombard.

DIS: Carey and Lombard, 901; 10-4.

CAR: 935.

CAR: They'll be right in the line of fire.

CAR: 1930 all units at the shooting scene 10-6. We're getting CP 11 in position, we'll have it shortly, just 10-6, seal the perimeter.

CAR: --?-- with a 10-33.

DIS: Unit with a 10-33.

CAR: On the northeast corner of Lombard and Carey I have an officer shot in the arm, needs immediate attention. They can come in behind the bar in the alley.

DIS: Is this Carey and Lombard in the alley on Lombard?

CAR: We're on the northeast corner.

CAR: Be advised if they come in from that direction, they're gonna have to have somebody with armor protection because he's got that whole side of the street covered.

CAR: 2245 in relative to the sniper.

DIS: 901 . All units 10-6. All units 10-6. 901. KGA to 901. 901. 901.

CAR: 901

DIS: They're gonna send the ambulance to Carey and Lombard. You can either intercept them or pick 'em up at that location and then dispatch 'em as you see fit in a safe manner from that location.

CAR: Carey and Lombard is good. Have 'em stand by there.

19:14:30

LOMBARD CAREY3a

Lombard Carey sniper incident

Police officers take shelter behind parked cars at Lombard & Carey streets as they exchange gunfire with the sniper

CAR: 942 for the ambo, 942 for the ambo.

19:14:40

DIS: 942.

CAR: Bring it to Pratt Street. The officers are going down to Pratt Street.

DIS: All units 10-6. 942 you're gonna have to repeat.

CAR: The two injured officers that are shot are going to Pratt Street. Have the ambo respond to Pratt street.

DIS: 901 you Ok?

CAR: 10-4

CAR: 2245 KGA

DIS: Go ahead.

CAR: In relative to the shooting, 935 and myself are on the third floor directly across from the sniper. It's 1306 Lombard. Will you get somebody up here with a rifle he could probably fire in that direction, 10-4. We have a shotgun only with the shells itself, no slugs or anything.

CAR: 1930, give me your exact location?

DIS: What is your exact location?

SIMULCAST

DIS: All units please stay off the air. All units wait until you're acknowledged. Too many units are calling 10-33 and you are over ridding each other. 901 is on the scene, we have a Command Post established; please get on City-Wide and wait until you're acknowledged before you give your message.

CAR: 1912 with a 10-33.

DIS: 1912.

CAR: Be advised he's on the second floor. He's breaking the second floor windows out now.

CAR: 1930.

DIS: he's in 1306. He's in 1306, is that correct?

CAR: 2245 - It's either four or six, there'll be an officer in the rear waiting for somebody to come with a rifle.

DIS: Also 901. Give that to Cruising Patrol 11. He's either in 1304 or 6. He has moved to the 2nd. floor at this time.

19:16:40

CAR: 2501.

DIS: 2501, go ahead.

CAR: 2501. I have Unit 9 on the scene with me. The Command Post is at Baltimore and Carey. I have CP 11 responding with one man with a rifle, one man with gas. Give me the exact location to send them.

DIS: 901.

CAR: 901- have them report to Pratt and Lombard.

DIS: Send them to Pratt and Lombard, Sir. Pratt and Lombard.

CAR: 2245 in relative to that man with the rifle and gas. 2245 in relative to the man with the rifle and gas. If he comes to where my 10-20 is, 1304 or six Lombard, he'll have a perfect shot in the direction where the sniper is. 10-4?

CAR: 2501. 10-9 that----

CAR: 2245 I'm at either 1304 or six West Lombard. I'm directly across, I'm on the third floor across from where the sniper is, if the man with the rifle and gas would come to this 10-20 he would have almost a perfect shot into the dwelling.

CAR: 10-4, I'm sending 'em down. You're at either 1304 0r 1306; the sniper man is at 1303 or 1305 is that 10-4?

CAR: That 10-20 is 1303 the sniper. I'm in, I think I'm at four. It might be six. First come to the rear. There'll be an officer to show you, I'm on the third floor.

CAR: 10-4.

CAR: 901 in reference.

DIS: 901.

CAR: Can you send another unit with gas to Pratt and Carey? Report we may pour gas in the rear besides the front.

DIS: That's Cruising Patrol 11 you want at Pratt and Carey

CAR: 1912.

DIS: Go ahead, 1912.

DIS: Sir, be advised we're in the adjoining house directly behind the suspect's house. There are two officers on the second floor, They're in plain clothes.

CAR: That's smart.

CAR: 10-9 that in reference to the police officers, 836 10-9 that message about the police officers being on the roof.

DIS: The unit calling in reference to the two plain clothes men, where are they at?

19:19:00

CAR: 1912 in reference; we're in the house directly behind the suspect house. We're on the second floor rear.

CAR: 901.

DIS: Go ahead.

CAR: 962 in reference to that sniper.

DIS: Go ahead.

CAR: 962 in reference to that sniper.

DIS: Go ahead.

CAR: Be advised, he's on the second floor. Second floor.

CAR: 814 in reference to the sniper.

DIS: 814.

CAR: The sniper..firing at the house on the even side of the 1200 block. He just fired four shots, anybody with a loudspeaker better start yelling for those people.

DIS: Unit 9 switch to channel 9.

CAR: 901 car.

DIS: 901.

CAR: Have all units hold their positions until they can move in with the gas.

DIS: Attention all cars on the scene of the shooting, hold your present position, stay in your present position until Cruising Patrol 11 has established a position.

CAR: 930 in reference, please.

DIS: Go ahead.

CAR: We have a witness that has an eyewitness view of that sniper shooting, he's in the first house next to the store in the 1300 block of Lombard and that would be on the south side.

SIMULCAST

DIS: Ok in reference to this Carey Street, please wait until you are acknowledged before you go ahead with your message, unless you have an injured officer.

19:20:40

CAR: 901.

DIS: 901 go ahead.

CAR: Ascertain if all the injured have been cared for.

CAR: 2501- 10-4.

DIS: Ok, has 973 been taken care of?

CAR: 2501 to 901.

CAR: 901.

CAR: Do you have the injured officer in sight down there?

CAR: 10-9.

CAR: Do you have the injured officers in sight down there?

CAR: I had two injured officers, they have been taken away in the ambos.

CAR: 2501, 10-4; the injured officers have been taken care of.

CAR: Is that also the one that was on the corner of Carey and Lombard?

CAR: Negative. Negative.

LOMBARD CAREY2a

CAR: 943 in reference.

DIS: All units 10-6. 901 I have information ---this is Radio---I have information that two officers, one from 793 and one from 926. Have they been cared for?

19:21:50

CAR: 926's been cared for---unknown on 793.

CAR: 1930 in reference.

DIS: Go ahead, 1930.

CAR: I escorted two officers; one in two different radio cars, to University Hospital. That's two officers went to University.

CAR: Where they plain clothes?

CAR: No one was in uniform. I couldn't tell if the other one was in plain clothes or uniform. They went in two different radio cars.

CAR: 793-A. My partner was down at Lombard and Carey behind the parked cars. He took a direct hit. Did anybody get him?

DIS: 793, was your partner in plain clothes or uniform?

CAR: Plain clothes, Sir.

CAR: 711 in reference.

DIS: Go ahead.

CAR: We're at the Northeast of Carey and Lombard. We got two officers down; one hit in the arm and one got hit in the chest. We are pinned down; we can't get out.

19:22:50

CAR: 2501 to all units---10-6. Give me your location again. 2501 to that unit, what is your location exactly?

DIS: Lombard and Carey, northeast corner. On Carey Street just north of Lombard; we can't get anybody in or out.

CAR: 10-4.... 10-6, we have help on the way.

CAR: 732 in reference to the ambo.

DIS: 732.

CAR: I got an ambo at Carrollton and Lombard. I think he's on standby.

CAR: Try and get an armored car?

CAR: 1914

CAR:1951 to 2501... 1951 to 2501.

CAR: 830 to 2501 in reference to the injured officers. 830 in reference to the injured officers.

CAR: 747.

DIS: 747

CAR: Be advised I've got four officers in a house directly across the street. We've got a clear shot right into his second floor window if you want to have that EVU wagon come up here, he can gain entrance to the vacant house by coming down Hollins Street in the back.

DIS: All units 10-6. All units. 747, give me the exact location.

CAR: Either 1304 or 1306 Lombard. It's a vacant building and we're on the second floor----no, third floor----- we got a straight shot into his second floor window.

DIS: 2501, you copy this information? They state they have three officers available at 1404 or six West Lombard. They have a direct line of fire for this suspect. They need the EVU Unit at that location.

CAR: 2501 be advised the EVU Unit is en route to that location with gas and a rifle. Have them 10-6; also have they cleared the other side of the two buildings on either side of the building where the sniper is cleared?

DIS: 901.... 901.

CAR: 795....795.....795 in reference to the injured officers.

DIS: 901, do you know if they cleared both sides of that building?

CAR: Uncertain on that Sir.

DIS: What unit has the Cruising Patrol 11?

CAR: 2501 Cruising Patrol 11 is here. We have two Cruising Patrol people on the way down with 1951.

DIS: 747, you are at 1304 or six West Lombard? Is that correct?

CAR: 10-4. We got a shotgun in the building and if they are gonna come down they can get in the back way. There's an officer gonna show 'em the way in.

DIS: 2501, they want Cruising 11 to respond to the rear of, it's either 1304 or six, there is an officer in the rear; he will show 'em where to come in. They come in the rear, they're directly opposite 1303 where that subject has now went back to the third floor.

CAR: 1914 in reference.

CAR: 830 in reference to these injured officers.

DIS: Go ahead, 830.

CAR: They're on the northeast corner of Carey Street and Lombard. They're behind the blue and white van. Now we got to get these men out of here somehow or another.

DIS: 2501.... All units 10-6. The Command Post will handle this. 10-6.....2501.

19:26:50

CAR: 2501.

DIS: The injured officers are trapped, the northeast corner of Carey and Lombard. They're behind a blue and white van; they can't get 'em out at this time. Can you handle this?

CAR: 2501... I am sending a team down. The team is en route now.

DIS: Ok, all units be advised. There is a team en route to Carey and Lombard to assist the injured officers.....10-6 unless you have emergency information.

CAR: 801.

DIS: Go ahead, 801

CAR: 801 -----10-32 this location. Information from the duty officer we have enough men present.

DIS: You want to 10-32 Carey and Lombard, you want no more units to respond?

19:27:40

DIS: Be advised we getting more injured officers

CAR: 1917 to 2501 be advised one block west the 1300 block civilians are still getting through. They're still coming down here.

Can you seal it off? we had a guy ride down the middle of the street on a bike.

DIS: All units, special attention to 2501 and 901. Any injured police you can get 'em, take 'em to Carrollton and Lombard. There's a Battalion Chief there with ambulance crews to transport same.

CAR: 830 in reference to this sniper.

DIS: Go ahead, 830.

CAR: I'm going to the firehouse and I have 1964 unit from Tactical here with me. And they have a clear fire of the window where the sniper is. And we're over-looking the two injured officers here.

CAR: 2501 to 1951....2501 to the C.P.

19:28:50

CAR: Are you with the man with the rifle?

CAR: 10-4...Permission to fire when ready.

CAR: Permission is granted. Unit 9 has granted permission, fire when you have a clear field to fire.

CAR: 1940, He's moved to the third floor again.

CAR: 2187 in reference.

CAR: 2501. All units 10-6. 2501 to 901.

CAR: 901.

CAR: The people that are sealing the perimeter on Lombard Street. as I understand there was a bicycle that came down the middle of it. Can you send a couple more people to see that that doesn't happen?

CAR: I just sent another man up there on that.

CAR: 10-4 Thank-you Would you report that to the Command Post?

CAR: 10-4

CAR: 2187.

DIS: 2187.

 LOMBARD CAREY3a

CAR: Be advised sir, I'm positioned up high and in the back alley. There is glass breaking out of the back part of one of those buildings; it may be him in one of those buildings. Glass just broke up there.

CAR: 836 in reference.

CAR: That's me. That ain't him, that's me.

DIS: That's 836 car, use caution; be aware of other officers and several plain clothes men are on the scene.

CAR: Don't go into that building unless cleared from the Command Post.

CAR: 1901, do you have a landline you can get me a number on, Joe?

CAR: 10-6 for a minute.

CAR: 1914.

DIS: 1914.

CAR: sir, we're in the building directly across the street, we have a shotgun and a clear line of fire. did you say permission to fire was granted?

19:30:50

CAR: 2501... That is 10-4. Permission to fire is granted when you have a clear field to fire. We're trying to establish land line communications with 2284.

CAR: 10-4. We're directly across the street with a shotgun, clear line of fire and when we get a target we're gonna open up.

CAR: That is 10-4.

CAR: 2501 to KGA.

CAR: 830 to 2501.

CAR: 2501.

CAR: On the roof of the firehouse with 1964 unit. When the other unit opens fire we can open fire. You can send an ambulance to get that other officer out of here. This guy is gonna die.

19:31:40

CAR: 2501. 10-4 we'll have an ambulance standing by. KGA, have an ambulance 10-11 2501 at Carrollton and Baltimore Street.

CAR: 962, get someone to fire on that dude.....he is tearing up the car with this officer hiding behind it.

CAR: 901.

DIS: 901.

CAR: Advise any units if they have a clear shot, to fire at him. He's firing at the police that are pinned down.

CAR: 2501to all units. The only unit that is to fire is the sniper.....?...10-6 all units.

DIS: 2501 advise all units do not fire. Only the sniper units.

CAR: 830 to 2501.

CAR: 2501.

CAR: I have a unit up on top of the firehouse here. 1964 has got rifle slugs. How about permission to put 'em in there?

CAR: 10-4.

DIS: All right, all units, 10-6 on the fire. Do not fire until 2501 gives the word. They want to make sure they get the injured officer. They're sending in a team at this time and when they're in position they'll give you the information.

19:33:00

CAR: 2501 to KGA......2501 to 1956.

CAR: 830 to 2501.

CAR: 830.

CAR: The officer that's hit in the chest is lying beside a yellow Pinto wagon. Negative, alongside the blue and white van.

CAR: 2501 to 1956.

CAR: 1956 standing by.

CAR: What is your 10-20?

CAR: We are at the alley, 1200 block of West Lombard, waiting for instructions.

CAR: Can you see the injured officers?

CAR: 830 in reference.

CAR: 2501--go ahead.

CAR: All right now, this officer that's shot in the chest, he's in front of a green Dodge. It's the third car up from the corner on Carey Street. There's a blue and white wagon with two officers behind it. A blue and white van and there's a yellow Pinto station wagon with one officer behind it and the next car up is a green Dodge with a black vinyl top and that officer's lying alongside it. That's the one that's hit in the chest. Also they think he is dead at this time.

19:34:40

CAR: 2245 to KGA. 2245 KGA.

DIS: 2245.

CAR: If you have a unit with a shotgun...shoot that street light out, and it'd give us some darkness maybe to get that officer out from there. The street light is too light. Have 'em shoot that light out.

CAR: 1951. Negative. 10-6,....10-6---?----He's blowing that light out.

CAR: 2501. 10-4. All units disregard the last. All units disregard the last.

CAR: 830, have 'em hold their fire.

DIS: All units, 830 advises do not fire at this time.

CAR: The lights are out now, but there's a lot of people down on the corner.

CAR: Let's get the officers out, for Christ sake.

CAR: 2501 to 1956.

CAR: 1956.

CAR: Do you know where the officers are now?

CAR: 10-4.... On Carey Street up on Carey. Three cars up.

CAR: Can you see them? Can you reach them?

CAR: We cannot see them from here. We have to change our location to an alley up the street here.

CAR: 10-4. 2401 to 1956.

CAR: 1956 standing by.

CAR: If I give you cover fire, can you reach those officers?

CAR: 10-6.... I'll go around there and determine that.

CAR: 1901 to the Command Post.

CAR: 2501 standing by.

CAR: Joe, I have the gas man with me; we went across Carey Street. Can you get a couple of those guys to give me a burst of fire so we can get across?

CAR: Lieutenant, you're giving me too much radio. I can't hear anything you said.

DIS: All units 10-6. They want you to repeat slowly, please.

CAR: 2501 to 1901, give me that again.

CAR: Just a second, Joe.

CAR: Cut one of the radios off. Lieutenant and I can't hear you.

DIS: 1901, can you repeat your information to 2501?

19:37:20

CAR: 1901. I need a base of fire for a couple guys to throw a few rounds, at the front of that place so we can get across Carey Street and have a better shot to throw some gas in there.

DIS: 2501.

CAR: to any unit across the street from 1301 Carey-----{ERROR}

CAR: 1912 and 1340.

CAR: Put down some cover fire when I give you the word.

CAR: 10-4, we're ready.

CAR: 1901.

DIS: All units 10-6 till 2501 gives them word for cover fire.

CAR: 830 in reference.

DIS: All units 10-6

CAR: 10-33 in reference to the sniper.

CAR: 2501 to 1901.

DIS: All units 10-6, until 1901 and 2501 get their cover fire.

CAR: 2501 to 1901. I will give the word for cover fire. When you hear the fire proceed.

CAR: 10-4 ready.

CAR: 2501 to 1912. 1914 throw in fire in that location.

CAR: Right now?

19:38:20

CAR: 10-4 NOW.

CAR: 2501 to 1901.....2501 to 1901....2501 to 1901.....2501 to 1956.

CAR: 1956.

CAR: 1956, what's your location now; can you get down to the officer?

CAR: 2501 to all units on the scene, 10-22 any further firing, 10-22 any further firing.

19:39:10

CAR: 1901 to Command Post.

CAR: Command Post.

CAR: Can you give us the location where those Western officers said they had a good shot at the front of it?

CAR: Talk slower, Lieutenant; I can't understand you.

DIS: 10-6 a minute. 1901, is that in reference to 1304 or six West Lombard?

CAR: 10-4.

DIS: I believe that was 747 unit. He said they have an officer in the back that will show 'em where to go.

CAR: They got all the wounded officers.

CAR: 1956 to 2501.

CAR: 2501.

CAR: Be advised, Sir, I'm with one of the injured officers now; there's another one we have to get to, it's about one car further south than I am.

CAR: 10-4, advise me when you can evacuate those officers and I'll throw in cover fire for you; can you do that?

CAR: 10-4. We can get one out right away. If you throw fire as soon as I get another officer to help me drag him out.

CAR: 2501...you can get the officer out, if you have cover fire?

CAR: 10-4.

CAR: 10-4, advise me when.

CAR: 2501 to 1912.

CAR: 1912.

CAR: 10-6 there, when I give you the word, throw in more cover fire. Do you need ammunition?

CAR: 10-4, Sir.

CAR: Is that officer right in front of the house across from that car? I'm close.

CAR: 2187, 2187; be advised I'm directly across the street right above the guy too, right across Lombard Street.

CAR: Is he behind that blue car?

CAR: He's behind the blue car across the street.

CAR: 2187....I'm above him on top of the house.

19:41:10

CAR: 830 to 2501, they got a couple of the officers out.

19:41:30

CAR: 836 in reference.

CAR: 2501. Go ahead.

CAR: All right, we got 'em in a green, a green van. And the rest of 'em are still over here.

CAR: 2501, you're gonna have to slow down and talk so that I can understand you.

CAR: 1956 to 2501. We have one officer out, still one down.

CAR: 2501, 10-4. Can you get the officer out with cover fire?

CAR: 10-4, if you got plenty of it.....10-6 a minute, we'll give you the word when we're ready.

CAR: 830 to 2501.

CAR: 2501.

CAR: 830; I have three Tactical officers up here on top the firehouse. Now let us know when you want cover fire, and I have a clear view of the other injured officer down there.

CAR: 10-4-----?--- I'm sending ammunition down to 1306.

CAR: 1107.

DIS: 1107.

CAR: 1107 to Homicide Unit. I got the man shot in the chest. I'm gonna need an ambo to take him to the hospital. We are now clear at Pratt and Carey. Now clear at Pratt and Carey.

19:42:30

DIS: 1107 has the officer clear with the shot in the chest. You're taking him away now?

CAR: ---?---, the officer's clear.

CAR: Get to Hollins and Stockton. Send him to Hollins and Stockton.

CAR: 746......(several cars talking, unable to understand anything)....An officer hit down at Stockton Street. Stockton and Lombard,

DIS: Stockton and Lombard; you have another injured officer?

19:43:00

CAR: Stockton off of Hollins, have 'em come to Hollins Street. I'll get---?---?----

DIS: All units 10-6, we have the information, Stockton and Lombard, we have another injured officer.

CAR: 795 in reference, have that ambo come to Stockton and Hollins. I'll direct him in, just get him up here.

DIS: Be advised the man now using the radio; we cannot understand you. Your gonna have to speak slower.

19:43:30

CAR: Ok....Direct that ambo to Hollins and Stockton. I'll direct him in, Hollins and Stockton.

DIS: Ok, we realize the situation at Hollins and Stockton for the ambulance for the injured officer.

(Several cars talking)

CAR: 2501 to all units, 10-6....... 2501 to the officer at Stockton and Lombard......2501 to any officer at Stockton and Lombard.

DIS: The officer on the scene is that Hollins and Stockton you want?

CAR: 10-4..... Hollins and Stockton Street, this man is hurt bad.

DIS: KGA to 2501, All units 10-6,....All units 10-6. ...2501 only.

CAR: 2501 to the unit at Stockton and Lombard Can that abbo get in there without going under fire?

CAR: We got him now, we got him now.

DIS: KGA to all units,...10-6....All units,...10-6, Stay off the radio.....2501 ONLY.

CAR: 2501.

DIS: We have a subject on the phone, states he is the suspect, his name is John Williams, he says stop firing, he wants to surrender. He's at 1303 West Lombard, His name is John Williams.

CAR: 2501 to KGA......Advise that suspect to come out of the house with his hands up in the air, absolutely no weapons in his hands. Advise any units on the scene to 10-22 any firing. Let that suspect come out of the house.

19:45:20

DIS: All units.......All units hold your fire. ...All units hold your fire.

CAR: (unknown): Shoot him.

CAR: (unknown): Waste him.

CAR: 2187 in reference to that, please.

DIS: 2187.

CAR: 10-4, I have information from a citizen, this man's name was Jimmy Burrough..... This is at 1306. All units use Caution.

SIMULCAST

19:45:40

CAR: 2501 to all units; stand by until we get in position.

DIS: KGA to all units; be advised, this subject is supposed to be a John Williams, he's at 1303 West Lombard. He states that he's now in the basement, he wants to surrender; 2501 advises all officers hold your fire.

CAR: 2501 to KGA.

DIS: 2501 Only.

CAR: You still have land line with that man?

CAR: 1901 to Command Post.

CAR: Command Post 2501 standing by.

Car: We're in a position to throw some gas in there, Joe.

If you can, give us a base of fire to give us some cover for the man to get over the edge of this roof.

CAR: 10-4....10-6 ....just one minute, Lieutenant....10-6....2501 to KGA.

CAR: Unit 9, will you tell 'em to keep the line clear.

DIS: We have an officer on the telephone that states this is the suspect and he's gonna advise him to come out of the building with with his hands raised, nothing in his hands.

CAR: 2501.....10-4, advise him to lay down on the street when he comes out of that building.......to lay down on the ground.

CAR: Cover the rear door, Joe.

19:47:00

CAR: 2501 to KGA......Have him come out of the building.

DIS: 10-4

CAR: All units...10-6 on any fire...All units

CAR: 748

DIS: 748.

CAR: Have CP 11 come down Stockton Street to Lombard. The Command Post wants him down here.

CAR: 1951 to 2501... Be advised the man's out of the house, two officers have him in custody, have all other men stay away from the house.

19:47:30

CAR: 2501 to all

SIMULCAST

DIS: Attention from the officer, there's two officers have the suspect in custody

Two officers have the suspect in custody, all officers are to stay away from the scene. All weapons are supposed to have been left on the third floor of 1303 west Lombard.

19:47:50

END

Devider

Officer Robert Brown, Western District, was off duty and sitting on his porch when the shots rang out that night. He responded to the sounds of the shots being fired to assist with the incident. The suspect Johnnie Earl Williams was taken into custody, and Motor Officer Pete Richter lead the way to the paddy wagon for transport to the Homicide Unit.

Devider

LOMBARD CAREY4a

POLICE DEPARTMENT

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND
Communications Division

Transcript

450 Mhz

Western District Dispatcher
16 April 1976
Time: 18:59:40

DISP: {SIMULCAST by City-Wide}

CAR: ----?---- 10-23

CAR: 793.

DIS: 793.

19:00:10

CAR: We're responding to that 13 on Carey Street.

CAR: 714 get some shotgun units down here.

DIS: Any units responding stay off Carey Street.

{SIMULCAST, same, City-Wide}

19:00:40

CAR: 713

DIS: 713. Units on the scene, it's supposed to be on the southwest corner, the second house.

(SIMULCAST, SAME)

19:01:20

CAR: 746-- I'm going on City-Wide for Carey Street

CAR: 710.

DIS: 710.

CAR: Advise the units on City-Wide and direct traffic going eastbound on Baltimore. Also have one at Carrollton, direct westbound traffic. We also need another one at Carey and Fayette diverting southbound till this thing's clear. 10-4?

DIS: I don't have anything to send there now, they're down there on Carey.

CAR: 772. I'll take Calhoun and Baltimore.

19:03:20

( SIMULCAST, City-Wide, ....of Unit 9)

19:03:40

CAR: 713 with a 10-33.

DIS: Go ahead.

CAR: 713 with an officer shot; an officer has been shot at the unit block of Carey Street.

DIS: That's in front of the engine house on Carey Street?

CAR: The officer's shot bad.

DIS: Ok, an ambulance will be notified. All Units 10-6 until we get Carey Street cleared up. All Units 10-6

19: 04:10

CAR: ---?--- in reference.

DIS: Go ahead.

CAR: ---?--- the subject is supposed to be in an alley close to the firehouse.

DIS: Give that information to City-Wide, for a City-Wide broadcast, also.

CAR: 710, see if you can ascertain who it is.

DIS: We don't mention any name on the air.

CAR: 762's on the scene.

DIS: 10-9.

CAR: 762's on the scene.

DIS: Any unit on the scene at the firehouse on Carey Street.

CAR: ---?---

DIS: Let me have the ranking officer on this channel.

19:05:30

CAR: 703.

DIS: 703

CAR: I'm the ranking officer Sir, do you have any ambo on the way?

DIS: That's correct, an ambo's on the way. If you have any information in reference to the subject's.......?

DIS: (SIMULCAST "heavily armed" info)

19:05:50

DIS: 703

CAR: 703.

CAR: 713.

DIS: 713

CAR: I'd like permission to throw a large amount of fire to evacuate this wounded officer.

DIS: 713 car.

CAR: 713.

DIS: Have you got the officer out of the area?

CAR: We're pinned down; anybody can get a clear shot at the building, start taking it, so we can move that officer.

19:07:00

CAR: 713.

DIS: 713.

CAR: We're pinned down in front of....

CAR: 711.

DIS: 711.

CAR: Advise I'm pinned down in front of the fire station. I've got an officer here, he's been hit in the upper part of his chest. He's bleeding very badly. We can't get anybody in or out right now.

DIS: 711.....711 car.

CAR: 711.

DIS: Are you able to get to the officer?

CAR: 10-4.

DIS: Do you have the officer?

CAR: I'm holding his arm.

DIS: 10-9 the message.

CAR: He's holding his own, now.

CAR: 710.

DIS: 710.

CAR: Ascertain from 11 if he's got that officer.

DIS: 711 car.

CAR: 10-4, keep everybody out of the unit block of Carey.

DIS: Ok, all units.

(SIMULCAST to 10-26 City-Wide)

19:09:00

DIS: Any units on the scene in the unit block of south Carey clear the alley, clear the alley.

19:10:00

(Simulcast -- same)

19:10:30

(Simulcast-- same again)

19:11:20

DIS: 745....743....746.

19:14:50

(SIMULCAST, "stay off air")

19:15:00

CAR: 745.

DIS: 745.

19:17:30

CAR: 745....746...748...will be on City-Wide.

CAR: 732.

DIS: 732.

CAR: We're also on the scene, we'll be City-Wide.

CAR: 770.

DIS: 770.

CAR: Have 771 and 781....10-11 Baltimore and Carey to direct traffic.

DIS: DIS: 771 and 770.... They probably back to City-Wide now. We broadcast any units in the area to go City -Wide.

CAR: 10-4

CAR: 783.

DIS: 783

CAR: Hold me 10-7 Fayette and Calhoun.

DIS: 10-4

19:19:40

CAR: 761

DIS: 761

19:20:00

CAR: Sir, in reference to the shooting incident, there is two officers in uniform that are going up on the roof on the even side of South Carey Street.

DIS: Give that info to City-Wide.

CAR: 10-4

CAR: 713.

DIS: 713.

19:23:00

CAR: I cannot get through on City-Wide. Have 714 unit ---?--- at Lombard and Carey on the northwest corner. He needs an ambulance.

Northeast corner, northeast corner..He needs an ambo.

DIS: Northeast corner of Carey and Lombard, you need an ambo?

CAR: 10-4, I can't get through on City-Wide.

DIS: Ok. 19:23:20

19:23:50

DIS: 713,....713, any unit on the scene at Carey and Lombard....713....713, any unit on the scene at Carey and Lombard, is it safe for that ambulance to come through?

CAR: 761 in reference.

DIS: 761.

CAR: 10-47. (negative)

DIS: You say it's negative, you say it's not safe for him to come through.

CAR: 10-4. it is not at this time, this guy's still shooting.

CAR: 795.

DIS: 795.

CAR: See if 793-A is on this channel.

DIS: 793,...793.

CAR: We can't get in on City-Wide. We got an ambulance crew standing by at Pratt and Carey, and they are wondering how they can get up to the injured officers. Is there any way possible to get up there.

19:26:00

DIS: 10-6 a moment, we're trying to find that out now....761,...761...795.

CAR (7)95.

DIS: Where do you have the ambulance?

CAR: Carey and Pratt Street.

DIS: 10-6 on this channel a moment.

DIS: 795....795.

CAR: (7)95. I got the ambulance crew, we walking up towards Lombard; we'll be standing by Lombard and Carey with the ambulance crew.

19:27:40

DIS: Ok, use extreme caution up there.

CAR: 10-4... Can you tell me where the officer is?

DIS: The information we have, the officers are behind a blue and white van on the northeast corner of Carey and Lombard. Use extreme caution, though, that subject is still firing up there.

19:32:00

DIS: 745, 746, 743, 742 (all called , no response)

CAR: 795.

DIS: 795.

CAR: See if you can locate an ambo crew. I think we can get 'em in there if you can locate one ---?--- at Lombard and Carey.

19:33:00

DIS: 795, 795.

CAR: 795.

19:34:00

DIS: 795, 795 go ahead.

CAR: 795, 795.

19:41:00

DIS: Unit calling 10-9.

CAR: ---?--- we got the officer.

DIS: where do you want the ambo?

CAR: Have the ambo come down Lombard Street, Pratt Street. Have 'em come down Hollins Street. Hollins and Stricker.

DIS: Any unit can make the officer out, 10-9.

CAR: 795, Dispatcher, dispatch the ambo crew to Stockton and Hollins. On the double, on the double.

DIS: What's your 10-20, 795, I can't make you out.

CAR: Stockton: Stockton and Hollins. I'm gonna transport one officer myself. Have 'em get here to Stockton and Hollins......

19:42:20

DIS: 795, be advised the ambo is en-route....795 the ambo is en-route.

19:4240

(SIMULCAST, Surrender, City-Wide)

19:45:40

*END*


The foregoing five pages were reduced to typewritten form by Lieutenant Herbert F. Armstrong, after data was taken from tapes by Officer Ignace Thibodeaux.

Lombard Carey aa

POLICE DEPARTMENT

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND

Communications Division

Southern and Southwestern District Dispatcher

450 Mhz

16, April 1976

Time: 18:59:00

CAR: 1924, 1924.

DIS: 1944.

CAR: Be advised we got shooting at police cars in the area of Boyd and---?----.

DIS: Boyd and what?

CAR: 2245. It's Carey and Lombard. It appears to be on Lombard Street. I believe it may be on the 2nd. floor.

DIS: Lombard. Ok, what hundred block of Lombard?

CAR: Carey and Lombard.

CAR: It's Lombard by the confectionary store.

18:59:30

DIS: SIMULCAST 18:59:40

CAR: 962 responding. 31's on the way, 922 right around the corner.... 926 we're responding.

SIMULCAST


19:00:00

CAR: 926; 812.

DIS: All units 10-6........ anyone injured?

CAR: 2245...... I'm there too......2245. Advise those cars they are in the line of fire.

CAR: 930's on the scene. 19:00:30

DIS: 901,...901.

CAR: 901.

CAR: 922. Get 'em out Carey and Lombard.

CAR: 901's responding.

DIS: SIMULCAST 19:00:40

CAR: 922.....I'm at Carey and Lombard...That's------?------ off-duty Western Man...He's in the 3rd. floor second house from the corner.

CAR: 2246 responding.

CAR: Information coming from a citizen...it's supposed to be a broken up on top the second or third floor...----?--- they're coming from.

CAR: 922.....on the way, he's supposed to get the shotgun.

CAR: 935's got a shotgun.

CAR: 912 responding with a shotgun.

CAR: 912 responding with a shotgun.

CAR: 930 in reference.

19:01:30

DIS: Go ahead, you have the airway.

CAR: 930....Be advised we have a situation down here in the unit block of south Carey Street...We have shots being fired from ----?--- ----?---- west side of Carey Street, unknown right now.

DIS: Ok, 10-4...901's responding also, we're trying to get CP 11 also to responding. Also be advised City-Wide advises a plain clothes car radiator has been damaged to that shooting.

CAR: 830's on the scene. 19:02:00

DIS: Ok.

DIS: All units keep the air waves clear in case of an emergency, if you need assistance, use the airways...All units 10-6 till the emergency is clear.

CAR: 931....

DIS: SIMULCAST 19:02:30

CAR: 922...----?----.

DIS: 10-4.

CAR: We got an open door we can almost see into the house. Is anybody in the back?

CAR: 31 and two other units back here with a shotgun, they ain't going nowhere.

CAR: 962 with a 10-33; he's shooting out the window.

CAR: 911. We got an injured man here; he's been shot.

DIS: What's the location?

CAR: In front of the fire station.

DIS: Ok, 10-4 19:03:20

CAR: 926. Any unit on the scene, do you know where they're shooting from?

CAR: 922. It's the house right next to the grocery store. There's a pocketbook on the porch.

CAR: Is that by----?----?

DIS: SIMULCAST

19:03:40

CAR: ........ and Carey at the Gulf Station.

DIS: Ok, where's the injured officer, where's the injured officer?

CAR: Pratt and Carey. Get the ambulance down here.

DIS: Give me a location.

CAR: 962.

DIS: Go ahead 962.

CAR: There's somebody else shooting around here other than this guy.

DIS: yeah.... You got 930 set up a command post... 930 set up a command post and give me a location.

CAR: ---?--- Hollins and Carey Street, Hollins and Carey Street, in the ah-- the ah-- gas station lot.

DIS: The command post is located at Hollins and Carey You have gulf Station Lot.... Where's the injured officer?

CAR: ---?--- at Lombard and Carey, we can't get close.

19:04:40

DIS: You say the officer is pinned down?

CAR: 901 in reference.

DIS: Go ahead.

CAR: 2245, stand by, because I'm directly across from the sniper. I'm up on the north side of Carey Street, directly across from his firing. If you can have someone with a rifle come up here, they might be able to get him out.

DIS: 2245 are you injured?

CAR: 2245. Be advised I'm directly across the street from the sniper; I'm about even with his line of fire. We need somebody with a rifle. I only have a revolver.

DIS: Do you know the address, 2245, where the sniper's at?

19:05:30

CAR: 1303 Carey Street, on the 3rd. floor, there's a window open.

CAR: 901. CAR: 962.

DIS: All units 10-6. 2245, can you give us more information?

CAR: Negative. I can't look outside. I'm right in his line of fire, but the address that I can see is 1303 Lombard Street.

DIS: 10-4

CAR: 901.

DIS: 901, go ahead.

CAR: ---?--- on the scene switch to City-Wide. I'm going to City-Wide.

CAR: 962.

DIS: Go ahead.

CAR: Be advised it sounds like he possible has a rifle type weapon here. It's a possibly a Winchester he keeps reloading.

DIS: 10-4.

CAR: 831. Advise those units he's got the whole unit block of Carey covered up there from that roof top.

CAR: 901.

DIS: 901, go ahead.

CAR: Advise that we have all streets blocked off, now.

DIS: Ok, all units be advised all streets in the unit block of Carey Street vicinity are blocked off.

19:07:30

Car: 930.

DIS: 930.

CAR: Have CP11 respond to Hollins and Carey, 10-4?

DIS: 10-4.

SIMULCAST re: Command Post broadcast


19:07:50

CAR: 972,...972.

DIS: Go ahead 972.

CAR: He just fired up Carey Street toward the firehouse, the shots are going up that way.

DIS: 10-4, where's the exact location of that injured?

CAR: 972.

DIS: Go ahead 972.

CAR: He just shot a police car in the unit block of South Carey.

DIS: We're aware of that 972. Where's the injured officer? We want to know where the injured officer's located?

19:08:50

CAR: 10-33, 10-30.

DIS: Go ahead with the emergency.

(Several units talking re 10-33 in 100 block south Carey)

CAR: A Police hit over here.

CAR: 941.

CAR: There's two officers hit. 100 block South Carey, Carey in the rear of that house.

CAR: 921, 921.

DIS: 921.

CAR: The suspect across the street on top of the roof, behind squashing the firehouse. He went back behind his squashing the firehouse; the other officer's in the alley; you better have 'em clear out.

DIS: The suspect's on the roof across the street from the firehouse. All units, the suspect is on the roof across from the firehouse. Any units in the alley clear.

19:09:50

(SIMULCAST, "STAY out of range......")

19:10:40

CAR: 836.

DIS: 836.

CAR: Have all those other units switch to City-Wide. We have some still on this channel. Ok.

DIS: Ok. All units on the scene at Carey Street, 10-26, 10-26.

(SIMULCAST)


19:11:20

CAR: 847.

DIS: 847.

19:11:40

CAR: I got a shotgun. I'm at Pratt and Monroe. You want me go to the Command Truck?

DIS: Go ahead, 847. Go ahead to the Command Post. On the way, stay off of Carey Street.

CAR: 10-4, I'm going down Pratt.

DIS: Be advised that suspect is armed with a high-powered rifle...Stay out of his range.

CAR: 922.

DIS: 922

CAR: Have the Ambulance come down.

DIS: 10-9 unit reference to that ambulance.10-9 your information.

CAR: 910.

DIS: 910.

CAR: I'm responding. I have a carbine and a shotgun.

DIS: Be advised stay away from Carey Street. The command post is at Carey and Hollins.

CAR: 10-4.

CAR: Injured Officer.

CAR: 831,...831.

DIS: 831.

CAR: Be advised 830's on the scene. Could you ascertain from him if he can meet us at the command post?

DIS: 830, 830. All units are on City-Wide Channel. 831.

CAR: 10-4.

CAR: 933. I'm transporting an injured officer to University. Notify them.

19:16:00

DIS: Ok, 10-4, 933.

CAR: 962.

CAR: 962

19:19:10

CAR: Be advised that sniper's on the second floor now. Second floor.

DIS: Ok, give that 10-26, give it to City-Wide.

CAR: 943.

DIS: 943.

19:20:20

CAR: Be advised there's two officers injured from that skirmish at University.

DIS: 10-4. 943 go back to City-Wide and advise them.

CAR: 10-4

19:21:20

CAR: 933.

DIS: 933.

19:26:20

DIS: They still have two officers pinned down. Right now there's none on the way to University. They're still pinned down. They can't get to them.

19:27:30

CAR: Ok, I'll advise the hospital and have a team stand by. Ok?

DIS: 10-4.

DIS: Ok, we got a person injured in the street, 1521 W. Pratt.

DIS: 922. 923.

CAR: 923.

DIS: Ok, 1521 West Pratt advise how close that is to Carey.

CAR: About three blocks.

DIS: We have a person lying in the street at that location. See how close you can get to it. 922 advise if you can't make it.

CAR: 10-4.

19:28:20

SIMULCAST

19:45:40

DIS: .....Hold your fire.

SIMULCAST

19:47:40

DIS: SURRENDER

* END *

The foregoing seven pages were reduced to typewritten form by Lieutenant Herbert F. Armstrong after data was taken from Communications Division tapes by Officer Ignance Thibodeaux.         

POLICE DEPARTMENT

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND

COMMUNICATIONS DIVISION

Transcript

16, April 1976

Telephone Position No. 19

Centrex

"Surrender"

CENTREX: Police Department.

CALLER: Ma'am?

CENTREX : Police Department.

CALLER: Listen: they're shooting at me.

CENTREX: Who's shooting at you?

CALLER: The police.

CENTREX: Where are you?

CALLER: I'm the person at 1303, just tell 'em I'm coming out, just don't shoot me.

CENTREX: Oh, come on.

CALLER: I'm not playing, Miss.

CENTREX: You are, cause I hear people talking in the background.

CALLER: Miss.......

CNTREX: Well, let me give you the Sergeant in Radio, then.

(Telephone Position No.13. 396-2284)

OIC: Communications, Officer Arnold.

CALLER: Call 'em up, just do anything, tell 'em to quite shooting at me. I'm coming out of the house peacefully.

OIC: Who is this?

Caller: 1303West Lombard Street.

OIC: Where? You're coming out peaceful?

CALLER: YES, they were shooting at me 'cause I was firing back; but gonna surrender, I'm giving up. They won't listen to me.

OIC: Uh-huh.

CALLER: Just tell 'em to let me come out by myself, please.

OIC: All right, what's your name, Pal?

Caller: Sir?

What's your name?

CALLER: John Earl Williams.

OIC: John Earl Williams?

CALLER: Yes, Sir ALL youse gotta do is get on the phone but do something, contact 'em.

OIC: uh-huh, I'll contact 'em all right, what's your address there?

CALLER: 1303. They're all around me, I just give up. West Lombard.

OIC: All right, you just stop shooting now. I'll take care of it.

CALLER: just tell 'em, tell 'em to yell, tell me to come out. I'm coming out, please.

OIC: All right. How many shots did you fire?

Caller: Oh, my God, I don't know. I'm giving up.

OIC: uh-All right, John. I'll take care of you. Hold on the line, here.

CALLER: Ok, Ok.

19:43:20

19:45:10

OIC: You still there, John?

CALLER: Yes.

OIC: Huh?

Caller: Yes, Sir.

OIC: Ok, go out the front of the house.

CALLER: Yes, Sir.

OIC: Put your hands in the air, no weapons.

CALLER: Yes, Sir.

OIC: Dump all your weapons.

CALLER: Yes, Sir, I ain't got nuttin.

OIC: All right?

CALLER: I ain't got nothing, they're all on the third floor and I'm in the basement.

OIC: You're in the basement?

CALLER: Yes, Sir.

OIC: hold on.

19:45:30

OIC: All right, go ahead out, John; put your hands in the air.

CALLER: Please don't tell me a lie. I don't want to get shot.

OIC: They won't shoot you.. You got my word it they won't shoot you.

CALLER: They are firing at me.

OIC: What's the phone number there, John?

CALLER: Sir?

OIC: What's the phone number there?

CALLER: 752.

OIC: 752--Huh, what's the number?

CALLER 7646.

OIC: 7646.

CALLER: Yes, Sir.

OIC: All right, John, go out the front door. Go out the front door, put your hands in the air, leave all your weapons.

CALLER: Yes, Sir.

OIC: And you are in the basement?

CALLER: Yes, Sir.

OIC: All right, go ahead, John

CALLER: Officer, Officer.......

OIC: Go ahead, John, you won't be shot.

OIC: John......John.....John......(He ain't on there any more).

19:46:50

*END*

(Taken off tape by Officer Ignace M. Thibodeaux, Communications)

Reduced to typewritten form by Lt. Herbert F. Armstrong 4/17/1976

NOTE- Centrex operator was Senior Telephone Operator Betty Linn; O-I-C on position 13 was Police Officer Richard Arnold.

For a Detailed History of QRT / SWAT Click Here

Devider

Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department.

Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll

QRT/SWAT

Sunday, 26 January 2020 07:17

Quick Response Team
qrt 
QRT
"Quick Response Team"

QRT - Baltimore's "Quick Response Team" began forming in 1976; shortly before the Lombard and Carey St. sniper incident that members of Tactical Units realized a need for better training, and better equipment, to handle riots, barricade and hostage type situations. Following in the footsteps on other agencies they were going to name their team SWAT (Special Weapons And Tactics) But the department (Frank Battaglia, to be more precise didn’t think any sort of "S.W.A.T." function was necessary and tried to stop the program at every opportunity.) They found the word “SWAT” to be too harsh (Political Correctness circa 1975/76) QRT was the name eventually chosen by then Col. Robinson after suggestions from TAC personnel were solicited on top of the political correctness, Robinson also wanted to distinguish BPD from LAPD, NYPD, etc.; thus, he went with QRT over SWAT The follow pictures taken from the Baltimore Sun paper will show some of our earliest members of QRT, our founding fathers you might say, of today's Baltimore SWAT team (BTW in 2006 after 20 years the department finally gives in, and joins 1976 - just kidding, the men and women that have worked QRT/SWAT over the years have been some of the elite, in an already elite department of police that took pride in their job, and in protecting the citizens they swore to protect) 

For a More Detailed History Click Here

police epson 086 1010 QRT 1978 photo by joseph A DiPaola 72

Photo was taken by Sun Photographer Joseph A. Dialola


The QRT officer in the back might be Lenny Rummo? The first officer ringing the doorbell is John McGuire, behind John is Frank Icanvino (sp?). Officer McGuire left the BPD soon after this photo was taken to work for the State Department. Photo was taken at 1010 Broadway as QRT was looking for a shooting suspect back in July-03-1978
Butchy

Picture Taken by Sunpaper Photographer Walter McCardell
Left to Right Officer Dennis Dean, Officer Ronnie Hubbard, and Officer Al Erhardt

October 29, 1976, As members of Quick Response Team (QRT), suit up on Greenspring Ave. the call came out as a man with a gun in the 5800 block of Western Run Dr. - The Newspaper article said - Police don flak jackets for a foray against what turned out to be a juvenile prankster. So if you ever wonder why police approach every scene with caution, now you know, they don't know the dangerous calls, from the prank calls, the good guys from the bad guys, and just like you, they want to go home at the end of their shift.

KSCN0003 sm

Quick Response Team  

Seen standing in this pic with a.30 cal. carbine rifle covering the front of the location (1500 blk Federal St) in 1978, is Jerry DeManss. This was the location where Officer Mike Casizzi was shot in the stomach. I worked Mike Casizzi years later, he was good police. 


Original QRT Squad0001 72
The First QRT Squad - A-3. 

From left to right, STANDING:  EVU Officer? and EVU Sgt. Dave Bryant, A-3 Squad Officers Roger Rose, Jim Sebore (sp.), Gary Green, Mike Speedling, Kelly Allen, Lee Baker, Norm Bleakly, Andy Gersey;  KNEELING:  Sgt. Joe Key, Steve Grennell, George Smith, Mike Hurm, Lenny Rummo, Ed Schillo, Bob Letmate.  This photo was taken at Gunpowder Range in Feb. 1976 when the squad was trained by the FBI in SWAT ops.  Roger Rose broke his arm during the training and left the squad.  The blue coveralls were bought from a company that made uniforms for bread truck drivers.  A-3 was the only squad operational during Lombard and Carey and for two-three months afterward.  The G.O. authorizing QRT wasn’t signed until I left QRT on Oct. 77

Original QRT Squad0001 72Sgt. Ed Schillo

QRT Sharp Shooter 
QRT Counter Sniper

To become a QRT/SWAT Counter Snipers, the marksman has to practice all the time, and their qualifying test has them shooting the .308, at targets less than half the size of a human skull, from a distance of as much as 75 yards on a timed course, and the marksman has to shoot a 100% in order to make Marksman and become a "Counter Sniper".  

swat1a

Baltimore SWAT Team

QRT (Quick Response Team) is renamed SWAT (Special Weapons and Tactics) after 32 years the department finally changes the name of this highly trained, elite team. (Initially in 1974 while forming the team the department was against using the name SWAT because they felt the name was too harsh for the department image. Political correctness circa 1974.)

qrt lyndale ave

SWAT Lyndale Ave. 2006

Basic Training Sniper School 72
Courtesy Lt Joe Key
Basic Training Sniper School

swat2

"No matter how tired or sweaty I felt, when a situation was resolved and we (the team ) were leaving the location with the usual media crush with lights and cameras on, I would not, at that moment, trade places with anyone in the world" A quote from Jerry DeManss and all the QRT'ers

img218

1303 W. Lombard St taken on 16 APR.76. Officer Edwin Schillo is looking out from the window. He was assigned to the Tactical Section QRT.  This was the Sniper Incident at Lombard and Carey Streets. Officer Jimmy Halcomb was murdered and four other Officers were shot. Then Officer Edwin Schillo  can be seen standing where the sniper was firing from the window. There were several rifles on the bed with a large mound of ammunition next to them. The white pock marks on the face of the row house are bullet strikes, and there were many bullet holes in the wall and ceiling of the bedroom. The official count was 540 rounds fired. The actual number of rounds fired was much more. This was one of the most tragic incidents in the history of the BPD.

left to right Lt Schillo Lt Gutberlet Sgt. Munyan

Left to right is Lt. Schillo, Lt. Gutberlet, & Sgt. Munyan

bpd swat1

Baltimore Police QRT (Quick Response Team)

Pimlico infield preakness May 1995 Courtesy Lt. Don Healy

Bunker training 72

Courtesy Lt Joe Key
Bunker training
Chuck Thompson at Training Site 72Courtesy Lt Joe Key
Chuck Thompson at Training Site
 
2003 QRT training at Gunpowderjpg

QRT Law Day 1996Courtesy Lt. Don Healy
 
SWD barricade 
Courtesy Lt. Don Healy
 
Tac QRT A platoon 1997Courtesy Lt. Don Healy

FBI QRT Training A 3 Squad0001 72

Courtesy Lt Joe Key
FBI QRT Training A3 Squad 1
 

5 lineup
Quick Response Team

  bpd swat2

 
Tactical operation 315 E. 22nd. St. February 12, 2007
 
bpd swat3
House Entry 72

Courtesy Lt Joe Key
House Entry

bpd swat4

bpd swat5a

SWAT
Special Weapons And Tactics

Kuhn Chase St 1987 Bunker Saves Life 72

Courtesy Lt Joe Key
Kuhn Chase St 1987 Bunker Saves Life


Kuhn Chase St May 1987 2 rds 72
Courtesy Lt Joe Key
Kuhn Chase St May 1987

2300 block Allendale Road 11 8 2007 
SUN PHOTO

Police at the front door of a house in the 2300 block of Allendale Road in West Baltimore where officers confronted an armed man who had fired at least one shot, according to officials. (Sun photo by Karl Merton Ferron / November 8, 2007)

Gwynns Falls Parkway Allendale Rd 11 8 2007
SUN PHOTO

A police vehicle sits at the corner of Gwynns Falls Parkway and Allendale Road near a West Baltimore house where police confronted an armed man who had fired at least one shot, according to officials. (Sun photo by Karl Merton Ferron / November 8, 2007)

  tactical training1
 
Photo courtesy Herb Moseley

tactical training2
tactical training3
 

tactical training4

Photo courtesy Herb Moseley

Kuhn Rappell Training Tie Off Cover with Long Gun 72
Courtesy Lt Joe Key
Kuhn Rappell Training Tie Off Cover with Long Gun

Agt DeManss Agt SchilloAgt DeManss & Agt Schillo
Photo Certification

Courtesy Lt Joe Key
Photo Certification

Schmidt taylor Gilbart Thomas Williams Ellis Wocjik Rose 72

Courtesy Lt Joe Key
Schmidt, Taylor, Gilbart, Thomas, Williams, Ellis, Wocjik, Rose


Sniper Training 72

Courtesy Lt Joe Key
Sniper Training


Steve Woody at Camden Yards 72

Courtesy Lt Joe Key
Steve Woody at Camden Yards

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SWAT ("Special Weapons And Tactics") is a commonly-used proper name for law enforcement units, which use military-style light weapons and specialized tactics in high-risk operations that fall outside of the abilities of regular, uniformed police. "SWAT" is commonly-used internationally, as a colloquial, generic term for these units.

Their duties include: confronting heavily-armed criminals; performing hostage rescue and counter-terrorism operations; high-risk arrests and; entering armored or barricaded buildings. Such units are often equipped with specialized firearms including sub-machine gunsassault rifles, breaching shotguns, riot control agents, stun grenades, and sniper rifles. They have specialized equipment including heavy body armor, ballistic shields, entry tools, armored vehicles, advanced night vision optics, and motion detectors for covertly determining the positions of hostages or hostage takers, inside enclosed structures.

History

 Some sources state that the first use of "SWAT" as an acronym for "Special Weapons and Tactics" was the Special Weapons and Tactics Squad established by the Philadelphia Police Department in 1964. A more prominent early SWAT team was established in the Los Angeles Police Department in 1967, by Inspector Daryl Gates. After that, many United States law enforcement organizations, especially the police departments of major cities, as well as federal and state agencies, established their own elite units under various names. Gates explained in his autobiography Chief: My Life in the LAPD that he neither developed SWAT tactics nor the associated and often distinctive equipment; but that he supported the underlying concept, tried to empower his people to develop it, and generally lent them moral support. Gates originally named the platoon "Special Weapons Assault Team"; however, his name was not generally favored and was rejected by his manager, deputy police chief Ed Davis, as sounding too much like a military organization. Wanting to keep the acronym "SWAT", Gates changed its expanded form to "Special Weapons And Tactics".

While the public image of SWAT first became known through the LAPD, perhaps because of its proximity to the mass media and the size and professionalism of the Department itself, the first SWAT-type operations were conducted north of Los Angeles in the farming community of Delano, California on the border between Kern and Tulare Counties in the San Joaquin Valley. At the time, César Chavez' United Farm Workers union was staging numerous protests in Delano, both at cold storage facilities and outside non-supportive farm workers' homes on city streets. The Delano Police Department responded by forming ad-hoc units using special weapons and tactics. Television news stations and print media carried live and delayed reportage of these events across the United States. Personnel from the LAPD, having seen these broadcasts, contacted Delano and inquired about the program. One officer then obtained permission to observe the Delano Police Department's special weapons and tactics units in action and afterward took what he had learned back to Los Angeles where his knowledge was used and expanded on to form the LAPD's own first SWAT unit. John Nelson was the officer who conceived the idea to form a specially trained and equipped unit in the LAPD, intended to respond to and manage critical situations involving shootings while minimizing police casualties. Inspector Gates approved this idea, and he formed a small select group of volunteer officers. This first SWAT unit initially consisted of fifteen teams of four men each, making a total staff of sixty. These officers were given special status and benefits and were required to attend special monthly training sessions. The unit also served as a security unit for police facilities during civil unrest. The LAPD SWAT units were organized as "D Platoon" in the Metro division.

Members of the San Bernardino Police Department SWAT team on September 23, 1998.
Members of the U.S. Air Force 60th Security Forces Squadron SWAT team, Travis Air Force Base, California, practice hostage rescue on July 18, 1995.

The first significant deployment of LAPD's SWAT unit was on December 9, 1969, in a four-hour confrontation with members of the Black Panthers. The Panthers eventually surrendered, with three Panthers and three officers being injured. By 1974, there was a general acceptance of SWAT as a resource for the city and county of Los Angeles.

On the afternoon of May 17, 1974, elements of the Symbionese Liberation Army (SLA), a group of heavily-armed left-wing guerrillas, barricaded themselves in a residence on East 54th Street at Compton Avenue in Los Angeles. Coverage of the siege was broadcast to millions via television and radio and featured in the world press for days after. Negotiations were opened with the barricaded suspects on numerous occasions, both prior to and after the introduction of tear gas. Police units did not fire until the SLA had fired several volleys of semi-automatic and automatic gunfire at them. In spite of the 3,771 rounds fired by the SLA, no uninvolved citizens or police officers sustained injury from gunfire. However, all the gunmen inside were killed.

During the gun battle, a fire erupted inside the residence. The cause of the fire is officially unknown, although police sources speculated that an errant round ignited one of the suspects' Molotov cocktails. Others suspect that the repeated use of tear gas grenades, which function by burning chemicals at high temperatures, started the structure fire. All six of the suspects suffered multiple gunshot wounds or perished in the ensuing blaze.

U.S. Air Force 37th Training Wing's Emergency Services Team use a team lift technique to enter a target building during training at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas on April 24, 2007.

By the time of the SLA shoot-out, SWAT teams had reorganized into six 10-man teams, each team consisting of two five-man units, called elements. An element consisted of an element leader, two assaulters, a scout, and a rear-guard. The normal complement of weapons was a sniper rifle (a .243-caliber bolt-action, based on the ordnance expended by officers at the shootout), two .223-caliber semi-automatic rifles, and two shotguns. SWAT officers also carried their service revolvers in shoulder holsters. Standard gear included a first aid kit, gloves, and a gas mask. At a time when officers were usually issued six-shot revolvers and shotguns, it was a significant change to have police armed with semi-automatic rifles. The encounter with the heavily-armed Symbionese Liberation Army, however, sparked a trend towards SWAT teams being issued body armor and automatic weapons of various types.

A report issued by the Los Angeles Police Department, following a shootout with the Symbionese Liberation A rmy in 1974, offers one of the few firsthand accounts by the department regarding SWAT history, operations, and organization. On page 100 of the report, the Department cites four trends which prompted the development of SWAT. These included riots such as the Watts Riots, which in the 1960s forced the LAPD and other police departments into tactical situations for which they were ill-prepared; the emergence of snipers as a challenge to civil order; political assassinations; and the threat of urban guerrilla warfare by militant groups. "The unpredictability of the sniper and his anticipation of normal police response increase the chances of death or injury to officers. To commit conventionally trained officers to a confrontation with a guerrilla-trained militant group would likely result in a high number of casualties among the officers and the escape of the guerrillas." To deal with these under conditions of urban violence, the LAPD formed SWAT, notes the report.The report states on page 109, "The purpose of SWAT is to provide protection, support, security, firepower, and rescue to police operations in high personal risk situations where specialized tactics are necessary to minimize casualties."

The Columbine High School massacre in Colorado on April 20, 1999, was another seminal event in SWAT tactics and police response. As noted in an article in the Christian Science Monitor, "Instead of being taught to wait for the SWAT team to arrive, street officers are receiving the training and weaponry to take immediate action during incidents that clearly involve suspects' use of deadly force." The article further reported that street officers were increasingly being armed with rifles, and issued heavy body armor and ballistic helmets, items traditionally associated with SWAT units. The idea is to train and equip street officers to make a rapid response to so-called active-shooter situations. In these situations, it was no longer acceptable to simply set up a perimeter and wait for SWAT. As an example, in the policy and procedure manual of the Minneapolis Police Department, it is stated, "MPD personnel shall remain cognizant of the fact that in many active shooter incidents, innocent lives are lost within the first few minutes of the incident. In some situations, this dictates the need to rapidly assess the situation and act quickly in order to save lives."

 

On February 7, 2008, a siege and subsequent firefight with a gunman in Winnetka, California led to the first line-of-duty death of a member of the LAPD's SWAT team in its 41 years of existence.

SWAT duties

SWAT duties may include:

Hostage rescue

Riot control

Perimeter security against snipers for visiting dignitaries

Providing superior assault firepower in certain situations e.g. barricaded suspects

Rescuing officers or citizens endangered by gunfire

Counter-terrorist operations

Resolving high-risk situations with a minimum loss of life, injury, or property damage

Resolving situations involving barricaded subjects

Stabilizing situations involving high-risk suicidal subjects

Providing assistance on arrest warrants and search warrants

Providing additional security at special events

Special Training

Organization

SWAT officers respond to the 2009 Fort Hood shooting.

The relative infrequency of SWAT call-outs means these expensively-trained and equipped officers cannot be left to sit around, waiting for an emergency. In many departments, the officers are normally deployed to regular duties but are available for SWAT calls via pagers, mobile phones or radio transceivers. Even in the larger police agencies, such as the Los Angeles PD, SWAT personnel would normally be seen in crime suppression roles—specialized and more dangerous than regular patrol, perhaps, but the officers would not be carrying their distinctive armor and weapons.

Although due to Officers having to be on call-out most of the day, they may be assigned to regular patrol. To decrease response times to serious situations that need the direct attention of SWAT Officers, it is now a widely used method to place SWAT equipment and weaponry in secured lockers in the trunks of specialized police cruisers. Such departments that need to use this are Sheriffs due to the size of the counties and places like Los Angeles traffic may be high so LAPD use cruisers to respond with their Officers so they do not have to return to the police building. Although for heavier duty equipment they may need depending on the situation that arises.

By illustration, the LAPD's website shows that in 2003, their SWAT units were activated 255 times, for 133 SWAT calls and 122 times to serve high-risk warrants.

The New York Police Department's Emergency Service Unit is one of the few civilian police special-response units that operate autonomously 24 hours a day. However, this unit also provides a wide range of services, including search and rescue functions, and vehicle extraction, normally handled by fire departments or other agencies.

The need to summon widely-dispersed personnel, then equip and brief them, makes for a long lag between the initial emergency and actual SWAT deployment on the ground. The problems of delayed police response at the 1999 Columbine High School shooting has led to changes in police response, mainly rapid deployment of line officers to deal with an active shooter, rather than setting up a perimeter and waiting for SWAT to arrive.

Training

SW AT officers are selected from volunteers within their law enforcement organization. Depending on their department's policy, officers generally must serve a minimum tenure within the department before being able to apply for a specialist section such as SWAT. This tenure requirement is based on the fact that SWAT officers are still law enforcement officers and must have a thorough knowledge of department policies and procedures.

SWAT applicants undergo rigorous selection and training. Applicants must pass stringent physical agility, written, oral, and psychological testing to ensure they are not only fit enough but also psychologically suited for tactical operations.

Emphasis is placed on physical fitness so an officer will be able to withstand the rigors of tactical operations. After an officer has been selected, the potential member must undertake and pass numerous specialist courses that will make him a fully qualified SWAT operator. Officers are trained in marksmanship for the development of accurate shooting skills. Other training that could be given to potential members includes training in explosives, sniper-training, defensive tactics, first-aid, negotiation, handling K9 units, rappelling and roping techniques and the use of specialized weapons and equipment. They may also be trained specifically in the handling and use of special ammunition such as bean bags, flash-bang grenades, tasers, and the use of crowd control methods, and special non-lethal munitions. Of primary importance is close-quarters defensive tactics training, as this will be the primary mission upon becoming a full-time SWAT officer.

SWAT equipment

SWAT teams use equipment designed for a variety of specialist situations including close quarters combat (CQC) in an urban environment. The particular pieces of equipment vary from unit to unit, but there are some consistent trends in what they wear and use.

Weapons

While a wide variety of weapons are used by SWAT teams, the most common weapons include submachine guns, assault rifles, shotguns, and sniper rifles.

Tactical aids include K9 Units, as well as a flashbang, stinger, and tear gas grenades.

Semi-automatic pistols are the most popular sidearms. Examples may include, but are not limited to: M1911 pistol series, Sig Sauer series (especially the Sig P226 and Sig P229), Beretta 92 series, Glock pistols, H&K USP series, and 5.7x28mm FN Five-seveN pistol.

Common submachine guns used by SWAT teams include the 9 mm and 10 mm Heckler & Koch MP5, Heckler & Koch UMP, and 5.7x28mm FN P90.

Common shotguns used by SWAT units include the Benelli M1, Benelli M4, Benelli M1014Remington 870 and 1100, Mossberg 500 and 590.

Common carbines include the Colt CAR-15 and M4 and Heckler & Koch G36 and HK416. While affording SWAT teams increased penetration and accuracy at longer ranges, the compact size of these weapons is essential as SWAT units frequently operate in Close quarters combat (CQB) environments. The Colt M16A2  can be found used by marksmen or SWAT officers when a longer ranged weapon is needed.

Common sniper rifles used are the M14 rifle and the Remington 700P. Many different variants of bolt action rifles are used by SWAT, including limited use of .50 caliber sniper rifles for more intense situations.

To breach doors quickly, battering rams, shotguns with breaching rounds, or explosive charges can be used to break the lock or hinges, or even demolish the door frame itself. SWAT teams also use many non-lethal munitions and weapons. These include Tasers, pepper spray canisters, shotguns loaded with bean bag rounds, Pepperball guns, stinger grenades, flashbang grenades, and tear gas. Ballistic shields are used in close quarters situations to provide cover for SWAT team members and reflect gunfire. Pepperball guns are essentially paintball markers loaded with balls containing Oleoresin Capsicum ("pepper spray").

Vehicles

Lenco BearCat owned by the Lee County Sheriff's Office (Florida) SWAT team

SWAT units may also employ ARVs, (Armored Rescue Vehicle) for insertion, maneuvering, or during tactical operations such as the rescue of civilians/officers pinned down by gunfire. Helicopters may be used to provide aerial reconnaissance or even insertion via rappelling or fast-roping. To avoid detection by suspects during insertion in urban environments, SWAT units may also use modified buses, vans, trucks, or other seemingly normal vehicles. During the 1997 North Hollywood shootout, LAPD SWAT commandeered an armored cash-delivery truck, which they used to extract wounded civilians and officers from the raging battle scene.

Units such as the Ohio State Highway Patrol's Special Response Team (SRT) used a vehicle called a B.E.A.R., made by Lenco Engineering which is a very large armored vehicle with a ladder on top to make entry into the second and third floors of buildings. Numerous other agencies such as the LAPD, LASD, and NYPD use both the B.E.A.R. and the smaller Lenco BearCat variant. Anaheim Police Department has a customized B.E.A.R. fitted with a ladder for assaulting multi-story buildings. Many SWAT teams in the states and around the world, including the LAPD, fit their armored and non-armored vehicles with the Patriot3 Liberator and 'MARS' (Mobile Adjustable Ramp System) Elevated Tactics Systems for gaining entry to 2nd and 3rd story buildings, airplane assault, sniper positioning, ship access, etc.

The Tulsa Police Department's SOT (Special Operations Team) uses an Alvis Saracen, a British-built armored personnel carrier. The Saracen was modified to accommodate the needs of the SOT. A Night Sun was mounted on top and a ram was mounted to the front. The Saracen has been used from warrant service to emergency response. It has enabled team members to move from one point to another safely.

The police departments of Killeen and Austin, Texas and Washington, D.C. use the Cadillac Gage Ranger, as does the Florida Highway Patrol.

Criticism

The use of SWAT teams in non-emergency situations has been criticized. Radley Balko, a policy analyst at the Cato Institute, authored Overkill: The Rise of Paramilitary Police Raids in America.

Other studies include Warrior Cops: The Ominous Growth of Paramilitarism in American Police Departments by Diane Cecilia Weber from the same institute and Militarizing American Police: The Rise and Normalization of Paramilitary Units by Dr. Peter Kraska and his colleague Victor Kappeler, professors of criminal justice at Eastern Kentucky University, who surveyed police departments nationwide and found that their deployment of paramilitary units had grown tenfold since the early 1980s.

 

For More Information On The History Of QRT / SWAT
CLICK HERE

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If you come into possession of Police items from an Estate or Death of a Police Officer Family Member and do not know how to properly dispose of these items please contact: Retired Detective Ken Driscoll - Please dispose of POLICE Items: Badges, Guns, Uniforms, Documents, PROPERLY so they won’t be used IMPROPERLY. 

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Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll

Sergeant James Robert Moog

Thursday, 05 December 2019 09:30

EVER EVER EVER Motto Divder

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Sergeant James Robert Moog

28 February 1931

Sergeant Moog, City’s Oldest Officers, Dies

On Active Duty Until 10 Days Ago, He Was Policeman Nearly 50 Years

Sergeant James Robert Moog, the senior of all men in the Baltimore Police Department, a Morgan Cavalryman [**] during the Civil War, and founder of Baltimore Police Department's Mounted Police Unit circa 1888 died in Mercy Hospital late last night [27 February 1931] following an operation for appendicitis. In rare cases, a blunt trauma of the abdomen (BTA) can be a direct cause of appendicitis. Seeing as how this happened more than 85 years ago it would be hard to tell if this due to some kind of trauma at the stables, or from illness, all we know is it occurred while working and on a streetcar he began to suffer from what he thought was an attack of bronchial asthma but was later found to be or brought on a case of an acute appendicitis.  

Note: Animals are a common trigger of asthma symptoms. One might be allergic to just one animal or more than one. Often, it's cats, dogs or horses. This means that even if the sergeant had a horse he was younger and did not react to it, he could be allergic to horses now. Sometimes, even if one has been around an animal for their entire life without developing allergies, it's possible to become allergic in their later years. There are also studies that show active asthma could be an unrecognized risk factor for appendicitis, it has been noted with children and the elderly. I don't know if this is a line of duty or not, but given the fact that he served 50 years, he fought in the civil war, and after losing a foot, that they took off while he was awake and watching. After having his foot removed, he got a prosthetic and continued to work. I think it would be great to continue to remember Sgt Moog, I mean what an inspiration to hear of the toughness and dedication of this kind of police.  

If he had lived until April 11th of 1931 he would have completed 50 years in the police department, one of the very few men at the time to have accomplished that.  Detective Lieutenant Thomas F.  Login, died a year earlier, was one such a man.  Sergeant Moog was 86 years old when he died.

Became Ill on a Streetcar

He was on active duty until 10 days prior to his death and was in charge of the stables for the Mounted Division on South Frederick Street.  On the day he was stricken by an attack of bronchial asthma he was on a streetcar, he was taken from the streetcar on Eutaw Street and Druid Hill Avenue by an ambulance from the No. 7 Engine House to the hospital.  There his asthma developed into an acute case of appendicitis.

A widower, Sergeant Moog lived with his daughter, Miss Catherine Moog, head of the department of English of the Eastern High School, at 3807 Bonner road

Funeral on Monday

The funeral services took place from his home that following Monday afternoon.  His son was a member of the faculty of a Boston School of Music.  He also had a second daughter, Mrs. Augustine Patterson, that also lived in Bolton.

Sergeant Moog’s service with the department began in early 1886 where he was assigned to work the Northwest District.  He spent the greater part of half a century on horseback as a member of the Mounted Division patrolling it outlying sections, chiefly in the Northwest District.  A love of horses was a marked characteristic of him throughout his life.

Always Wore Uniform

He always wore his uniform, with a yellow marking of the Cavalry Division. (In early BPD history, uniformed officers wore their uniforms both on and off duty) For years he led the police platoon which rode at the head of processions, from those to honor visiting celebrities to the military processions which marked the participation of this country in the world war and the return of the troops from France.

A real trooper, he knew the nature of the horse, he was at ease in the saddle no matter how great the blaring of the band’s behind him or nervousness of his mount.

Foot Is Amputated

At the battle of Gettysburg, a bullet struck him in the foot.  Two years ago, (1929) after the passing of 60 some odd years, an infection developed in that foot and he was taken to Union Memorial Hospital.  There it was found to be necessary to have the foot amputated.

A survivor of the civil war, when anesthesia was not as common as they were in 1931, the Sergeant told the surgeons that he did not need an anesthetic, and to go ahead and take his foot off; in fact, he wanted to see it, anyway.  He was given a local anesthetic and the operation performed.

Since that time, he had not ridden a horse but remained in charge of the stables.  He had an artificial foot made and his short, strong figure, of the Sergeant walking with a cane, continued to be seen about the police building as he appeared there to make his daily reports, but since he could no longer ride, he was forced to use streetcars to get around the city.

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moogPossibly taken in 1912 during the democratic convention here in Baltimore
The rider second from the left appears to me Sgt James Moog

Morgan Cavalryman Refers to John Hunt Morgan

1 Jun 1825 - 4 Sep 1864

John Hunt Morgan (June 1, 1825 – September 4, 1864) was a Confederate general in the American Civil War. In April 1862, he raised the 2nd Kentucky Cavalry Regiment, fought at Shiloh, and then launched a costly raid in Kentucky, which encouraged Braxton Bragg's invasion of that state. He also attacked the supply-lines of General William Rosecrans. In July 1863, he set out on a 1,000-mile raid into Indiana and Ohio, taking hundreds of prisoners. But after most of his men had been intercepted by Union gunboats, Morgan surrendered at Salineville, Ohio, the northernmost point ever reached by uniformed Confederates. The legendary "Morgan's Raid", which had been carried out against orders, gained no tactical advantage for the Confederacy, while the loss of his regiment proved a serious setback. Morgan escaped from his Union prison but his credibility was low, and he was restricted to minor operations. He was killed at Greeneville, Tennessee, in September 1864. Morgan was the brother-in-law of Confederate general A. P. Hill.

Like most Kentuckians, Morgan did not initially support secession. Immediately after Lincoln's election in November 1860, he wrote to his brother, Thomas Hunt Morgan, then a student at Kenyon College in northern Ohio, "Our State will not I hope secede I have no doubt but Lincoln will make a good President, at least we ought to give him a fair trial & then if he commits some overt act all the South will be a unit." By the following spring, Tom Morgan (who also had opposed Kentucky's secession) had transferred home to the Kentucky Military Institute and there began to support the Confederacy. Just before the Fourth of July, by way of a steamer from Louisville, he quietly left for Camp Boone, just across the Tennessee border, to enlist in the Kentucky State Guard. John stayed at home in Lexington to tend to his troubled business and his ailing wife. Becky Morgan finally died on July 21, 1861.

In September, Captain Morgan and his militia company went to Tennessee and joined the Confederate States Army. Morgan soon raised the 2nd Kentucky Cavalry Regiment and became its colonel on April 4, 1862.

Morgan and his cavalrymen fought at the Battle of Shiloh in April 1862, and he soon became a symbol to secessionists in their hopes for obtaining Kentucky for the Confederacy. A Louisiana writer, Robert D. Patrick, compared Morgan to Francis Marion and wrote that "a few thousands of such men as his would regain us Kentucky and Tennessee."

In his first Kentucky raid, Morgan left Knoxville on July 4, 1862, with almost 900 men and in three weeks swept through Kentucky, deep in the rear of Major General Don Carlos Buell's army. He reported the capture of 1,200 Federal soldiers, whom he paroled, acquired several hundred horses, and destroyed massive quantities of supplies. He unnerved Kentucky's Union military government, and President Abraham Lincoln received so many frantic appeals for help that he complained that "they are having a stampede in Kentucky." Historian Kenneth W. Noe wrote that Morgan's feat "in many ways surpassed J. E. B. Stuart's celebrated 'Ride around McClellan' and the Army of the Potomac the previous spring." The success of Morgan's raid was one of the key reasons that the Confederate Heartland Offensive of Braxton Bragg and Edmund Kirby Smith was launched later that fall, assuming that tens of thousands of Kentuckians would enlist in the Confederate Army if they invaded the state.

As a colonel, he was presented with a Palmetto Armory pistol by the widow of Brigadier General Barnard Elliott Bee Jr. That pistol is now owned by the Museum of the American Civil War.

Morgan was promoted to brigadier general (his highest rank) on December 11, 1862, though the Promotion Orders were not signed by President Davis until December 14, 1862. He received the thanks of the Confederate Congress on May 1, 1863, for his raids on the supply lines of Union Major General William S. Rosecrans in December and January, most notably his victory at the Battle of Hartsville on December 7.

On December 14, 1862, Morgan married Martha "Mattie" Ready, the daughter of Tennessee United States Representative Charles Ready and a cousin of William T. Haskell, another former U.S. representative from Tennessee.

Morgan's Raid

Hoping to divert Union troops and resources in conjunction with the twin Confederate operations of Vicksburg and Gettysburg in the summer of 1863, Morgan set off on the campaign that would become known as "Morgan's Raid". Morgan crossed the Ohio River and raided across southern Indiana and Ohio. At Corydon, Indiana, the raiders met 450 local Home Guard in a battle that resulted in eleven Confederates killed and five Home Guard killed.

In July, at Versailles, IN, while soldiers raided nearby militia and looted county and city treasuries, the jewels of the local masonic lodge were stolen. When Morgan, a Freemason, learned of the theft he recovered the jewels and returned them to the lodge the following day.

After several more skirmishes, during which he captured and paroled thousands of Union soldiers[citation needed], Morgan's raid almost ended on July 19, 1863, at Buffington Island, Ohio, when approximately 700 of his men were captured while trying to cross the Ohio River into West Virginia. Intercepted by Union gunboats, less than 200 of his men succeeded in crossing. Most of Morgan's men captured that day spent the rest of the war in the infamous Camp Douglas Prisoner of War camp in Chicago, which had a very high death rate. On July 26, near Salineville, Ohio, Morgan and his exhausted, hungry and saddle-sore soldiers were finally forced to surrender. It was the farthest north that any uniformed Confederate troops would penetrate during the war.

On November 27, Morgan and six of his officers, most notably Thomas Hines, escaped from their cells in the Ohio Penitentiary by digging a tunnel from Hines' cell into the inner yard and then ascending a wall with a rope made from bunk coverlets and a bent poker iron. Morgan and three of his officers, shortly after midnight, boarded a train from the nearby Columbus train station and arrived in Cincinnati that morning. Morgan and Hines jumped from the train before reaching the depot and escaped into Kentucky by hiring a skiff to take them across the Ohio River. Through the assistance of sympathizers, they eventually made it to safety in the South. Coincidentally, the same day Morgan escaped, his wife gave birth to a daughter, who died shortly afterward before Morgan returned home.

Though Morgan's Raid was breathlessly followed by the Northern and Southern press and caused the Union leadership considerable concern, it is now regarded as little more than a showy but ultimately futile sidelight to the war. Furthermore, it was done in direct violation of his orders from General Braxton Bragg not to cross the river. Despite the raiders' best efforts, Union forces had amassed nearly 110,000 militia in Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio; dozens of United States Navy gunboats along the Ohio River ; and strong Federal cavalry forces, which doomed the raid from the beginning. The cost of the raid to the Federals was extensive, with claims for compensation still being filed against the U.S. government well into the early 20th century. However, the Confederacy's loss of Morgan's light cavalry far outweighed the benefits.

The Baltimore Sun Thu Aug 27 1903 72

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The Evening Sun Sat Feb 28 1931 72

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Moog

Sergeant Jams R. Moog

Click on any of the following articles about Sergeant Moog

Exciting Runaway – 12 July 1895

"Finest" Really Fine?   16 May 1905  

Policeman’s Pocket Picked – 30 July 1915

Old Mounted Policeman Sees Horse Still Useful  10 April 1925

Department “Youngsters” Top Service Age Records   2 Dec 1927

Band Honoring Police Vets – 29 June 1930

James R. Moog – 28 Feb 1931

Police Department’s Oldest Member Dies – 1 May 1931  

Police Horse Live In Shadow of the Block – 30 Aug 1962

 
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POLICE INFORMATION

Copies of: Your Baltimore Police Department Class Photo, Pictures of our Officers, Vehicles, Equipment, Newspaper Articles relating to our department and or officers, Old Departmental Newsletters, Lookouts, Wanted Posters, and or Brochures. Information on Deceased Officers and anything that may help Preserve the History and Proud Traditions of this agency. Please contact Retired Detective Kenny Driscoll.

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NOTICE

How to Dispose of Old Police Items

Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department.

Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

 

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll 

Patrolwoman Mary S. Harvey

Thursday, 05 December 2019 08:50

Patrolwoman Mary S. Harvey

The first Women Officer was hired under the title of Policewomen was Mary S. Harvey, EOD of June 19, 1912, her hiring was followed by that of Margaret B. Eagleston July 22, 1912

 

ACC 138 BS 72

The First Women Officers
Mary S. Harvey, and Margaret B. Eagleston

1912 - 19 June 1912 - The first Women Officer was hired under the title of Policewomen was
Mary S. Harvey, EOD of June 19, 1912 her hiring was followed by that of
Margaret B. Eagleston July 22, 1912
1912 - 4 April 1912 John B A Wheltle,  Peter E Tome,  and Morris A Soper 
1912- 6 May 1912 Morris A Soper,  Daniel C Ammidon, and Alfred S Niles 
1912 - Morris A. Soper, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1912-1913 
1912/13 - The Baltimore police goes from Horse Draw "Patty" Wagons to motorized wagons. Oddly enough our first motorized wagons were manufactured by the same builder. 
1913 December 1913 - The Police Academy was established. - What later became known as our Police Academy, was first called “The Baltimore Police Department - School or Instruction” - It was house in the Northern District - From a 1934 newspaper article referencing this "School of Instruction", it talks about the effect on its young police, initially they wrote, "It's not long, this eight-week course that they put the newcomers through, upon the fifth floor of the Police Building at Fallsway and Fayette, but it is both thorough, and exacting. And since its founding fourteen years ago [an indication that it was moved from its initial location to the new headquarters in 1920] by Commissioner Gaither; the school has served as something of a guide, and model for virtually every big city in the country," Departmental officials said. 
1913 - 31 December 1913 James McEvoy, Daniel C Ammidon, and Alfred S Niles 
1913 - James McEvoy, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1913-1914 
1914 - 29 May 1914 - The Motor Unit was organized on May 29, 1914 - It began with just five members, Officers, Schleigh, Bateman, Pepersack, Vocke and Louis. 
1914 - 17 October 1914 - The first female officer shot in the line of duty was Policewoman Elizabeth Faber. As she and her partner, Patrolman George W. Popp were attempting to arrest a pick-pocket on the Edmondson Avenue Bridge they were both shot. (An interesting side note, The first woman police hired by the Baltimore Police department were hired two years earlier in June and July of 1912, and none of the women hired received firearms training until 1925) 
1925 - As an interesting side note on March 28, 1925 the Baltimore Sun reports - Two female members of department given first lesson in pistol shooting. They were Miss Margaret B. Eagleston and Mrs. Mary J. Bruff - A few days later Mrs. Mary HarveyMiss Eva Aldridge and Ms. Mildred Campbell were also trained. So basically the first two woman officers hired by the BPD weren't trained in firearms until they had been on the force for 13 years!)  

   

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Donations

Donations help with web hosting, stamps and materials and the cost of keeping the website online. Thank you so much for helping BCPH. 

Paypal History Donations

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POLICE INFORMATION

Copies of: Your Baltimore Police Department Class Photo, Pictures of our Officers, Vehicles, Equipment, Newspaper Articles relating to our department and or officers, Old Departmental Newsletters, Lookouts, Wanted Posters, and or Brochures. Information on Deceased Officers and anything that may help Preserve the History and Proud Traditions of this agency. Please contact Retired Detective Kenny Driscoll.

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Devider color with motto

NOTICE

How to Dispose of Old Police Items

Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department.

Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

 

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll 

Patrolwoman Margaret B. Eagleston

Thursday, 05 December 2019 08:33

Patrolwoman Margaret B. Eagleston

The first Women Officer was hired under the title of Policewomen was Mary S. Harvey, EOD of June 19, 1912, her hiring was followed by that of Margaret B. Eagleston July 22, 1912

ACC 138 BS 72

The First Women Officers
Mary S. Harvey, and Margaret B. Eagleston

1912 - 19 June 1912 - The first Women Officer was hired under the title of Policewomen was
Mary S. Harvey, EOD of June 19, 1912 her hiring was followed by that of
Margaret B. Eagleston July 22, 1912
1912 - 4 April 1912 John B A Wheltle,  Peter E Tome,  and Morris A Soper 
1912- 6 May 1912 Morris A Soper,  Daniel C Ammidon, and Alfred S Niles 
1912 - Morris A. Soper, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1912-1913 
1912/13 - The Baltimore police goes from Horse Draw "Patty" Wagons to motorized wagons. Oddly enough our first motorized wagons were manufactured by the same builder. 
1913 December 1913 - The Police Academy was established. - What later became known as our Police Academy, was first called “The Baltimore Police Department - School or Instruction” - It was house in the Northern District - From a 1934 newspaper article referencing this "School of Instruction", it talks about the effect on its young police, initially they wrote, "It's not long, this eight-week course that they put the newcomers through, upon the fifth floor of the Police Building at Fallsway and Fayette, but it is both thorough, and exacting. And since its founding fourteen years ago [an indication that it was moved from its initial location to the new headquarters in 1920] by Commissioner Gaither; the school has served as something of a guide, and model for virtually every big city in the country," Departmental officials said. 
1913 - 31 December 1913 James McEvoy, Daniel C Ammidon, and Alfred S Niles 
1913 - James McEvoy, was one of our Baltimore City Police Commissioner from 1913-1914 
1914 - 29 May 1914 - The Motor Unit was organized on May 29, 1914 - It began with just five members, Officers, Schleigh, Bateman, Pepersack, Vocke and Louis. 
1914 - 17 October 1914 - The first female officer shot in the line of duty was Policewoman Elizabeth Faber. As she and her partner, Patrolman George W. Popp were attempting to arrest a pick-pocket on the Edmondson Avenue Bridge they were both shot. (An interesting side note, The first woman police hired by the Baltimore Police department were hired two years earlier in June and July of 1912, and none of the women hired received firearms training until 1925) 
1925 - As an interesting side note on March 28, 1925 the Baltimore Sun reports - Two female members of department given first lesson in pistol shooting. They were Miss Margaret B. Eagleston and Mrs. Mary J. Bruff - A few days later Mrs. Mary HarveyMiss Eva Aldridge and Ms. Mildred Campbell were also trained. So basically the first two woman officers hired by the BPD weren't trained in firearms until they had been on the force for 13 years!)  

 

1 black devider 800 8 72

 Donations

Donations help with web hosting, stamps and materials and the cost of keeping the website online. Thank you so much for helping BCPH. 

 

Paypal History Donations

 1 black devider 800 8 72

POLICE INFORMATION

Copies of: Your Baltimore Police Department Class Photo, Pictures of our Officers, Vehicles, Equipment, Newspaper Articles relating to our department and or officers, Old Departmental Newsletters, Lookouts, Wanted Posters, and or Brochures. Information on Deceased Officers and anything that may help Preserve the History and Proud Traditions of this agency. Please contact Retired Detective Kenny Driscoll.

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

1 black devider 800 8 72

NOTICE

How to Dispose of Old Police Items

Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department.

Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

 

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll

Retired Detective Edward Chaney

Monday, 11 November 2019 11:10

Retired Detective Edward Chaney

ed

We are hoping to help keep Ed's Police family and friends updated in one place. We appreciate any support in the form of donations or kind words, so Ed's family can have closure, and a better understanding about who ed was when he was not with them. Monetary donations should go straight to Cindy Chaney.

Those of us that know Ed, know he has spent a lifetime helping others. He taught adults and children how to defend themselves through the discipline of karate. 


He served his community as a police detective in Baltimore for twenty years helping victims get justice and safety from those that had at one time or another harmed them. And he’s helped so many friends and neighbors with whatever they needed. 

After retiring from the Baltimore Police department Ed and his wife Cindy laid out a plan to relocate to sunny Florida. Within months of relocating he was diagnosed with metastatic head and neck cancer that started as a HPV- tonsil cancer. 


The original diagnosis was explained as a horrendous treatment but with excellent odds at beating the disease. That was more than two years ago at the time of this writing. While they briefly thought he was cancer free, it re-emerged in the lymphatic system, liver & bones.  Ed was receiving a new research treatment trial at the Moffitt Center in Tampa. 

Ed and Cindy have tried to do this financially on their own, but could use help from their families and friends.  But this fight has been longer, harder and more expensive than any they had ever imagined. Ed passed away, but the bills didn't end. The Police pension system cut in half when he passed, so now Cindy is left with the bills and only half the income she was used to whit ed by her side. This site is not about raising funds, it is about remembering Ed, but while we think of him, we can't help but think of his wife and her need for our help. So if you can give, please do we'll add a link to a PayPal where you can donate directly to Cindy. If you have nothing to give, share a story send it to us via email and we;ll add it to this page. Also share this link, so others can share stories, give donations, or pass the link on to their friends. In the end if we can think of ed keep his memory alive, give a little to help Cindy, share your memories of ed, and again share this link so others may do the same.


I know many friends and family have asked them how they can help. 

Send Pictures and stories so we can add them to this page.

ed2

ed3

 

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POLICE INFORMATION

Copies of: Your Baltimore Police Department Class Photo, Pictures of our Officers, Vehicles, Equipment, Newspaper Articles relating to our department and or officers, Old Departmental Newsletters, Lookouts, Wanted Posters, and or Brochures. Information on Deceased Officers and anything that may help Preserve the History and Proud Traditions of this agency. Please contact Retired Detective Kenny Driscoll.

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

Devider color with motto

NOTICE

How to Dispose of Old Police Items

Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department.

Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

 

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll