Broken Windows Theory

Thursday, 14 May 2020 05:48

Baltimore Police Department
Broken Windows Theory

The Broken Windows Theory, is an academic theory proposed by James Q. Wilson and George Kelling in 1982 that used broken windows as a metaphor for disorder within neighborhoods. Their theory links disorder and rudeness within a community to subsequent occurrences of crime. First small nuisances that will become small crimes, and small crimes become big crimes.

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Broken windows was developed by two academics, but it was never offered as an academic theory in the peer-reviewed journals.  It emerged as a piece in Atlantic Monthly, a somewhat sophisticated magazine.  The theory is been much maligned in the media of late because it has been conflated with some terrible ideas and racist practices such as “zero tolerance policing” and “stop and frisk” tactics.  The actual application of the theory to neighborhood policing dictates a specific type of partnership between police and citizens that would, if implemented properly, improve relationships between citizens and police.  The major flaw of the theory seems to be that it is an oversimplification of a complex set of social phenomena, and thus lacks much empirical support.

Since criminologist George L. Kelling and his coauthor James Q. Wilson published their “broken windows” more than 30 years ago, it has become a sort of “standard” theoretical explanation of why community policing is a good idea.  It was quickly taken up by several major police departments, including the LAPD, as part of community policing. It called for the building of police and community partnerships that would seek to prevent local crime and to create order. The basic logic was the simple premise that interrupting minor offenses before they could snowball and open the door to serious crimes, including violent crimes. 

At the core of the Broken Windows thesis is that incivilities beget further incivilities, and the severity of the incivilities gets worse over time.  At some point, the mere incivilities evolve into serious crime if the causal chain is not broken. It is important to note that Broken Windows does not suggest how problems should be solved, and it certainly never specifies that arrest is always the most appropriate tool.  Heavy-handed tactics like New York’s “stop and frisk” program cannot be reconciled with Broken Windows, nor with the problem-oriented approach that is often found in conjunction with it.

Prior to the advancement of various incivility theories such as broken windows, policing scholars and the police themselves tended to focus on serious crime.  The major concern was always with crimes that were perceived to be the most serious and consequential for the victim, such as rape, robbery, and murder. Wilson and Kelling viewed the crime problem from a different, more holistic vantage point. They saw “serious crime” as the ultimate outcome of a much longer chain of neighborhood phenomena, theorizing that crime stemmed from “disorder,” and that if disorder dissipated, then serious crimes would not occur.

The link between disorder and crime was theorized to be mediated by fear of crime, an important social variable in its own right.  Wilson and Kelling’s theory further postulates that the proliferation of disorder creates fear in the minds of citizens who are persuaded that the neighborhood is unsafe.  The fear of crime, which can range in intensity from a slight unease to a debilitating fear of victimization, causes residents to withdraw behind closed doors in order to remain safe. This withdrawal from the community weakens social controls that previously kept criminals in check. Once this process begins, the theory suggests, it tends to start a destructive feedback loop. Neighborhood disorder causes crime, and crime encourages yet more disorder and crime.  

A major aspect of the popularity of Broken Windows is the fact that it creates a theoretical framework for police practice.  Most criminological theories support changes in macro-level social policy rather than police policy within the framework of community policing. Earlier social disorganization theories offered solutions that were highly political, costly to develop and implement, and would take a long time to demonstrate any effectiveness.  These theoretical causes of neighborhood problems and crime are more appropriate to legislatures than they are to police departments. Broken Windows theory is seen by many as a way to institute rapid neighborhood-level change with minimal expense by simply altering the police crime-control strategy. It is far easier and less costly to attack “disorder” than it is to assail such daunting social ills as poverty and deficient education.  

References

Kelling, G. L. & Wilson, J. Q. (1982). Broken Windows:  The police and neighborhood safety.  The Atlantic.

Credit to author Adam J. McKee, Ph.D.

From <https://www.docmckee.com/WP/oer/criminology/criminology-section-6-4/

 

 
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POLICE INFORMATION

Copies of: Your Baltimore Police Department Class Photo, Pictures of our Officers, Vehicles, Equipment, Newspaper Articles relating to our department and or officers, Old Departmental Newsletters, Lookouts, Wanted Posters, and or Brochures. Information on Deceased Officers and anything that may help Preserve the History and Proud Traditions of this agency. Please contact Retired Detective Kenny Driscoll.

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How to Dispose of Old Police Items

Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department.

Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

 

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll 

Jesse James

Monday, 11 May 2020 19:10

Jesse James

The Baltimore Sun Sun Aug 25 1929 Jessie James Frey 72

Click on above article to see full size article

 Click HERE for Audio File of above Newsletter1 red devider 800 8 72

Jesse James Once Lived in Baltimore

25 Aug 1929

He stayed here more than once as did other well-known western characters from American history. Doc Holiday for one was trained as a dentist here in Baltimore at the University of Maryland Dental School. Getting back to the James Boys, it seemed when things got hot, they found their way to Baltimore where Jesse stayed under his alias Thomas Howard. Neighbors said he was a calm easy-going man. Approx. 1879 at the end of what was known as the “Serious Seventies” Baltimore was a quiet town. It had cobble stone streets for which barouches and other such vehicles of the time bumped and clattered their way over. The population at the time was only made up of 330.000 and city government only collected about $4 million a year in taxes. The mayor at the time was Ferdinand Latrobe who began his career as mayor and continued the position for seven terms. The Northern boundary of the city was North Ave. and its intersection with Madison Ave.

Jesse James’ Family Headquarters

Of all the parts of Baltimore’s history, Jesse and Frank James staying along with their families was not known until the 1920’s. It turns out that the bandit, his wife, kids, and his brother Frank James sometimes made Baltimore their headquarters and this took place during the serious and picturesque seventies. There was a story of a close call of what would have been a shootout between Frank James and our Baltimore City Policemen of the time.  Frank James lucked out, also prevented the thrill of anyone knowing the James boys were harbored by this city. It wasn’t often that Jesse James would leave a clue of his true identity when he galloped away from a crime back to where he once came, said, Robertus Love, a former newspaper writer, who knew Jesse personally and for a short time road with the James Boys in order to pen Jessie’s biography, “The Rise and fall of Jesse James,” Love liked Jesse very much.  Mr. Love wrote, “Mr. James stated that the family had lived at Nashville, and elsewhere in Tennessee in recent years, and for a time in Baltimore Md., and for some months in Kansas City just removing to St. Joseph.

Where did they live? The records are unclear, and the reason is unclear, he obviously didn’t give the name Jesse and Frank James, Thomas Howard wouldn’t have been as well know back then as it became after his having been killed. When Mrs. James spoke, she said, “We came here to live as other people do. They tell some hard things about my husband, but a better man never lived. He never drank, smoked, or chewed. He never liked whisky. He never swore in my presence and wouldn’t allow others to do so,” Jesse was evidently a good husband and father. A good family man.

A Good Neighbor

“Tom Howard” was the name taken by the man who was much “wanted by the police” in those days, and in all probability he was so successful in his attempt to “live as other people live” that his presence among them created no suggestion of a ripple in the quiet lives of his various neighborhoods. At the time of his death several people who had known him in various cities gave testimony that Tom Howard was “a good neighbor.” There were many who believed Jesse James was not an outlaw and bandit by choice, but that after the civil war he became involved in the guerrilla warfare which continued for some time between the border states, and through these conflicts becoming attached to an outlaw band, he found it impossible to break away. He had a ton of friends among law-abiding groups making it easy to slip in and out of towns where he did not commit crime and blend right in. There were many neighbors that said he attended church and sang all the hymnals, though they say he was obviously a better bank robber than he was a singer. A Baptist Minister once asked Jesse why he does not stop the things he is doing? Jesse answered, “If you’ll tell me just how I can stop, I’ll be glad enough to stop; but I don’t intend to stop directly under a rope!” His brother frank found a way to stop, he made his way into see a governor in the state of Missouri and turned himself in. He was tried for one crime in a plea deal, served his term, came out of prison, and lived to be a respectable member of society. It was at this period in his life that he told a story of his experience in Baltimore City. At the time of the telling he was employed as doorkeeper at a prominent theater, and the tale was related to a man who was then a young detective.  The story was told in Mr. Love’s book was based on Frank James’ theory that “the officer always gets it when he least expects it” “He the illustrated his point by relating his Baltimore experience, as he put it, “They thought they wanted me.” He said he was stopping in Baltimore; he had a room in a house built of solid block of dwellings with no space between them. One night he wanted something to eat, so he took a walk to a nearby market that was open. On the way back to his room with a basket of food on his left arm, his coat collar turned up and his hat brim turned down, he noticed a number of policemen walking up and down in front of his house and they were waiting for him to return. He said, “I was too close to turn back without drawing their suspicion. Directly across the street from the policemen I noticed a white horse hitched to a buggy; the street was well lit from gas lamps and the horse showed up quite well in the mellow gleam.

“I decided quickly upon my plan of action. Probably the officers, I thought, had the block surrounded. My plan was to walk straight on past them if they didn’t interfere with me; I would not go into my room at all. If they attempted to capture me, I would try to reach the horse and buggy by “shooting it out” with the officers. And then drive away as fast as that horse would have taken me.”  - “James said he walked along with his six shooter, which he had harnessed under his left arm. His right hand thus was concealed under his coat and under the arm in which the basket hung. Approaching the bunch of officers, he edged out toward the curbing, intending to walk around them as though he had not noticed them especially. When he was opposite the officers, one of them reached out a hand to stop him. James sprang backward into the street, off the sidewalk, toward the horse and buggy, pulling his pistol from its place, but not quite getting it out – not so that it was visible to the policemen.  “Well, sir, what is it? What is it?” James asked the officers who had tried to stop him. “Don’t be scared, “ said one of the officers, with an oath; we’re not going to hurt you,” James again said, “What is it?” expecting every second to find it necessary to open fire and “get” as many of them as he could, when another officer in a rather gentle tone said, “Say, don’t be afraid of us; we’re not going to harm you, man; we simply want to get men enough to serve as a jury in a coroner’s case where a man in the house next door to my house had died without medical attention, by natural cause or otherwise.” “James then saw, he stated, that the policemen were in front of the house adjoining the one where he was roomed…... he “simply told them he was not a citizen of Maryland but lived in Washington.”  But those Baltimore Policemen never knew how close they came to shooting it out with Frank James, and or how far from James his outlaw brother Jesse might have been.

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Donations

Donations help with web hosting, stamps and materials and the cost of keeping the website online. Thank you so much for helping BCPH. 

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POLICE INFORMATION

Copies of: Your Baltimore Police Department Class Photo, Pictures of our Officers, Vehicles, Equipment, Newspaper Articles relating to our department and or officers, Old Departmental Newsletters, Lookouts, Wanted Posters, and or Brochures. Information on Deceased Officers and anything that may help Preserve the History and Proud Traditions of this agency. Please contact Retired Detective Kenny Driscoll.

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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NOTICE

How to Dispose of Old Police Items

Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department.

Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

 

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll 

Homicide

Saturday, 02 May 2020 23:11

The Homicide Unit in our department is one of the most prestigious and most well known of the units, right up there with K-9 and the Aviation Unit. You will see our BPD Homicide personnel in action from the past up to the present and see how they have solved some of the worse crimes man can commit. Our own guys who have been able to bring closure to grieving families, that have lost a family member.

Out of State Die-cast Vehicles

Thursday, 23 April 2020 16:40

Out of State Die-cast Vehicles

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NOTICE

How to Dispose of Old Police Items

If you come into possession of Police items from an Estate or Death of a Police Officer Family Member and do not know how to properly dispose of these items please contact: Retired Detective Ken Driscoll - Please dispose of POLICE Items: Badges, Guns, Uniforms, Documents, PROPERLY so they won’t be used IMPROPERLY. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 
Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department.

Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222


Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll

Vehicles Diecast

Thursday, 23 April 2020 16:12

Baltimore City Police Die-cast Vehicles

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Over the years The Baltimore Police Department has had many cars, from many makers, in many styles, with many color schemes, and many decal designs. It would be not only impossible to own each of these cars, but it would also be impossible to gather, and maintain them even in something as simple as a photo collection it is hard to gather and maintain these vehicles. Still over the years men and women of the Baltimore City Police Department and other various departments began collecting a different kind of car from their departments, this thirst for ownership extended beyond the Cars, to the Wagons, and then into the Trailers, the Trucks, Helicopters etc. This page is made up of Vehicles my collection, some bought by me, some bought for me, and some that just somehow magically arrived on my doorstep, with a note attached that simply said, “Thanks, keep doing what you're doing” and so I am going to share this collection, in hopes that others will send their cars, trucks, boats, motorcycles, etc. in picture form of course. Pictures of their Baltimore Police Cars, Trucks, Trailers, Boats… whatever you may have. Send an email with a clear, sharp JPG, PNG etc. of your car(s) - individually shot from any, or all angles, and as much info as you have on that vehicle. I will include your name with your collection and give you full credit. You an send one car, or an entire collection. Collectors, builders, sellers etc. We want any and all mini BPD police car pics. Dealer's collections will be shown here, and we'll put up a page for them t sell from that links to here... I have a large collection, not as large as most people have, but for an old man that don't play with toys too much it is a lot.. (OK I play with them... anyway, I still have to shoot pics of them, and so do; So let's get it right, we want our cars looking good, let's go into a room that has good light, and let's use a camera, not a phone... watch our back-gounds, shoot as big as we can, we here at the sight will resize it to fit the site, yet still maintain a sharp, crisp pic with good color and detail.

1 BPD 1950 Chevy Solido 21 BPD AID 50 Stud Yat Ming 21 BPD AID 64 Merc Yat Ming1 BPD Traff Enf Mustang 21 eBay pt 2 Oct 2009 0281 eBay pt 2 Oct 2009 0281 IMG 49991 IMG 50021 IMG 50041 IMG 50051 Web site Feb 2013 10 cars 01028829 392350883642 4194110 n28829 392356093642 2687753 n323083 10150460974313643 1723918880 o334983 10150460965293643 143700333 o1560641 765346846891083 7117023963021953346 n1780639 10152239818868643 423205183 n1798419 10152239812358643 255243434 n1975248 10152239814463643 1178097256 n10013832 10152244371693643 1899114044 n10655246 10152889927053643 9029093896987522043 o10679805 10152889927498643 6604584592200658540 oBarry Wood Fox

fox trot

Made by and provided courtesy of Jim Derreth
Click
HERE on on the above pic to visit Jim Derreth

 

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 More to Come DSC3203

Click HERE on on the above pic to visit Jim Derreth

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POLICE INFORMATION

Copies of: Your Baltimore Police Department Class Photo, Pictures of our Officers, Vehicles, Equipment, Newspaper Articles relating to our department and or officers, Old Departmental Newsletters, Lookouts, Wanted Posters, and or Brochures. Information on Deceased Officers and anything that may help Preserve the History and Proud Traditions of this agency. Please contact Retired Detective Kenny Driscoll.

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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NOTICE

How to Dispose of Old Police Items

If you come into possession of Police items from an Estate or Death of a Police Officer Family Member and do not know how to properly dispose of these items please contact: Retired Detective Ken Driscoll - Please dispose of POLICE Items: Badges, Guns, Uniforms, Documents, PROPERLY so they won’t be used IMPROPERLY.

Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department.

Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222


Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll

Departmental

Thursday, 23 April 2020 02:42

EVER EVER EVER Motto Divder

Baltimore City Police
Departmentals


'CRASH SQUAD' CARS ARRIVE FOR POLICE

2 February 1938

The Sun (1837-1989); Feb 2, 1938; pg. 7

'CRASH SQUAD' CARS!

Arrive for Police!

New Autos, To Probe All Accidents,

To Go Into Service When Equipped

Crews Will Test Brakes of Machines Involved and Photograph Scene Three automobiles for the "crash squad" of the Police Deportment have arrived and will be placed in service as soon as they are equipped, Capt. Henry C. Kaste, head of the Traffic Division, announced yesterday. The machines will investigate all automobile accidents and will have decelerometers for testing the brakes of cars involved in crashes, as well as photographic equipment for recording the actual conditions after the accident

Two-Way Radios

They will have two-way radios, sirens and blinking red lights to enable them to get to the scene before the positions of the cars have been altered. The crews, graduates of the University of Maryland's Traffic School, will render aid to the injured and will reroute all traffic until the conditions have been photographed and measured.

Officials hope to relieve the foot patrolmen of responsibility for traffic accidents. Members of the "Crash Squad" will be given two days, A month in Traffic Court to handle their cases, and the new manner of collecting evidence is expected to result In more convictions, particularly in fatal accidents.

Squad Still Nameless

Serge. Clarence O. Forrester is head of the squad, which is still officially nameless. Other cities having similar departments have decided upon "Accident Investigation Department" for a title, and it is expected that this choice will be made here also.

The "crash squad" was organized alter a report from the Baltimore Safety Council in April, 1937, which recommended it as "a vital need for the securing of evidence." Coincident with the council's report, the grand jury urged the squad's creation as a means of reducing accident fatalities and injuries.

Nice Committee Calls Three Traffic Experts

Three traffic experts will appear before Governor Nice's automobile insurance committee at a meeting to be held at 8 P. M. Tuesday at the Emerson Hotel. They are: Dr. S. S. Stineberg, Dean of the College of Engineering of the University of Maryland, who is conducting the traffic school there. John P. Rostmeyer, director of the Baltimore Safety Council. Preston D. Callum, chairman of the Baltimore Traffic Committee. The committee was named by the Governor shortly after the first of the Year to make a study of automobile Insurance in the State, and to make Recommendations to him and the next General Assembly.

Members of the committee are:

George W. Baulk, chairman, and W. Harry Haller, of Frederick, representing - The insurance companies. John T. Shipway, of Flintstone; Jos. Eph S. Bigelow, of Annapolis, and J. Francis Rahlke, of Westminster, representing business men. Max Sokol, secretary, and Robert R. Carmen, representing the legal profession. The last Legislature passed a resolution calling for the appointment of the committee.

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Rice Joseph Robert newpaper article 1938 72Radio Policeman Hurt In 70-Mile an Hour chase Car Skids Crashes 

Into Speeder On Hanover Street A radio car patrolman is recovering today from serious injuries received when his scout car crashed into a machine on the Hanover street bridge during a seventy-miles an hour: chase after a speeding driver. The policeman, Robert Rice Thirty-eight, and Gardner Sparhawk, first block of Wheeler street, driver of the other machine, are under treatment in the South Baltimore General Hospital. 

CAR SKIDDED

Patrolman Rice said that he was alone in the radio car when he saw a car speeding past the intersection of Hanover street and Reedbird avenue. He gave chase and had nearly caught up with the car when his car skidded on the bridge and crashed into Sparhawk's machine. 

HEAD INJURIES

Patrolman Edward L. Sewyer had left the scout car a moment before the chase started. Had he been in the car, he probably would have been killed, for the right side of the car was demolished. Rice and Sparhawk received head wounds and the patrolman is also suffering from internal injuries. This is what happened to the scout car driven by Patrolman Robert Rice when it skidded into another machine on Hanover street bridge last night. Patrolman Rice was pursuing a speeding· motorist at 70 miles an hour. The patrolman was seriously injured. Photograph copyright, 1938, by The Baltimore New-Post. All Rights reserved. 

 

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12 O'Clock Boys
Three officers seriously wounded
Officer 'fighting for his life' after pursuit police said should have stopped

Baltimore police crash
Highway and Road Disasters
 
Police investigating pursuit called off that resulted in a crash that left an officer in grave condition
A patrol car chasing a moped Sunday resulted in a crash that seriously injured officers and the rider

One Baltimore police officer remained in grave condition Monday after the patrol car he was in slammed into a telephone pole Sunday afternoon after continuing a pursuit his commanding officer had called off.

A female officer, who also was in the car, remained in critical but stable condition with broken bones. The crash also involved the driver of a moped police said the officers had pursued, who was also injured and is hospitalized.

"One officer at this moment is fighting for his life at [Maryland] Shock Trauma [Center]," Baltimore police Deputy Commissioner Jerry Rodriguez said.

The crash occurred about 1 p.m. Sunday in Northwest Baltimore. The incident began after an officer saw a group of dirt bikers assembling in an alley, police said. Upon being spotted by police, the riders fled on their bikes, except one man who ran. The officer followed in his marked patrol car and saw the man hop on the back of a moped that stopped to pick him up.

Patrol officers in the area caught and lost sight of the pair on the scooter at various times, Rodriguez said. Spotting it, three officers in a patrol car gave chase, Rodriguez said. The scooter at that time was only carrying a driver.

Baltimore police have a strict policy that allows officers to pursue if the vehicles they are chasing carry suspects who pose immediate and serious threats to the public. Officers must get permission from a shift commander to pursue.

In this case, a sergeant told the three officers to discontinue the chase, Rodriguez said. Fifteen minutes later, officers called for paramedics, he said.

The patrol car had continued the pursuit and crashed into a telephone pole in the 2200 block of Kirk Ave. after the scooter made a hard turn into an alley, police said.

Rodriguez said police don't know why the officers disobeyed an order to stop.

"We want to know why," Rodriguez said. "We have more questions than answers, but we are attempting to get those answers."

Rodriguez said forensics investigators and members of police's CRASH team were called to retrace the moments preceding the crash. A police helicopter was also used to survey the crash site and map the route the pursuit had taken.

The third officer in the patrol car, a man, was not hurt. Rodriguez said investigators want to know why three police officers were in the patrol car. Marked cars are meant to carry no more than two officers.

While dirt bikes are illegal in the city, the moped was a licensed city vehicle, Rodriguez said. Fleeing police was the only violation the driver could be cited for, he added. No charges have been filed against the rider.

Baltimore police's Force Investigation Team, which reviews shootings and other serious incidents in which police force is used, is investigating.

Police did not release the name of the moped driver or the three officers, who Rodriguez said ranged in experience from a few years to about a decade on the job.

Police said the dirt bikers had assembled in the alley to attend a large motorcycle rally that was held a few hours later.

Scores of dirt bikers and spectators took to the streets around Druid Hill Park on Sunday afternoon for a memorial ride in honor of Devin Rankin, known among riders as "Lor Dev." Rankin was shot to death Thursday in the 4600 block of Mannasota Ave. in a killing that remains unsolved.

Some on social media referred to him as the "No-hands king" because of his ability to ride on one wheel without steering. Copyright © 2014,


2964039573 28a6d8e0e8 o-EditCourtesy Officer Howard Smith
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COURTESY SGT. ROBERT FISCHER

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COURTESY SGT. ROBERT FISCHER
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COURTESY SGT. ROBERT FISCHER
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COURTESY SGT. ROBERT FISCHER
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COURTESY SGT. ROBERT FISCHER
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COURTESY SGT. ROBERT FISCHER
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May 26, 1965 at 10:30 AM, Northern District Radio Car #502, manned by Officer Robert DiStefano driving and Officer Robert Michael were responding to a Signal 13 (Assist an Officer) call when at the intersection of 29th and Remington, they were cut off by a truck that had gone through a RED light. RC 502 was being operated with “lights and siren” struck the truck and turned it over on its roof. The truck then hit a utility pole that prevented it from breaking through the show window of Jarman Pontiac. Notice the indentation on the side of the truck. Joe deCarlo was the Sergeant and responded to the accident scene.

DISTEFANO ACCIDENT1

PHOTO COURTESY MAJOR ROBERT DiSTEFANO

DISTEFANO ACCIDENT2

PHOTO COURTESY MAJOR ROBERT DiSTEFANO

DIsTEFANO ACCIDENT3

PHOTO COURTESY MAJOR ROBERT DiSTEFANO

In the photo showing the front of the totaled (the engine was partially in the front seat) police car, that Officer Bob Michael, was talking to the T.I.S. Investigator. Please note the price of regular gas in the photo, 28.9 cents per gallon! Miraculously, no one was hurt in this accident!

DIsTEFANO ACCIDENT4PHOTO COURTESY MAJOR ROBERT DiSTEFANO

Leon Tomlin, a patrolman, at that time, was assigned to RC 502 car, on the relieving shift, thanked Officer DiStefano and Officer Michael for "expediting" the replacement process of the old unit. Ironically, the driver of the truck named John Brennan later joined the Baltimore Police Department. While in the academy he avoided his firearm and defense tactic instructors who were none the less, Officer Robert DiStefano and Officer Bob Michael. John Brennan later attained the rank of Sergeant. Sergeant Pattinson of the "I can teach a monkey how to drive, fame", informed Officer DiStefano that it was the worst accident that he had seen for a long time!
accident report1

PHOTO COURTESY MAJOR ROBERT DiSTEFANO
 A.I.D. accident report detailing the accident investigation

accident report2PHOTO COURTESY MAJOR ROBERT DiSTEFANO

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1968-Chev-wrecked-March-1971

BPD NEWSLETTER

The Departmental vehicle pictured above was the victim of a frequently occurring set of circumstances. The driver of this vehicle stopped behind the Departmental vehicle and the civilian auto it is assisting. Three warning devices should be employed by members of the Department while rendering this type of assistance; the emergency dome light should be operating, the four-way emergency flashers should be employed, and flares should be set out between 100 and 200 feet to the rear of the stopped vehicles. When stopped for a disabled motorist the police officer should take care to stay outside of his vehicle where practical and take a position of safety with the motorist. Officers should stop far enough behind the disabled vehicle, so that the vehicle will not cause damage to the departmental vehicle when it is being moved.disabled civilian vehicle in order to render assistance. While stopped, serving as protection to one civilian vehicle another struck the police vehicle from the rear. Accidents of the type just described need not happen with such alarming frequency. Some initial precautions will serve to protect both the Departmental vehicle and the civilian auto it is assisting. Three warning devices should be employed by members of the Department while rendering this type of assistance; the emergency dome light should be operating, the four-way emergency flashers should be employed, and flares should be set out between 100 and 200 feet to the rear of the stopped vehicles. When stopped for a disabled motorist the police officer should take care to stay outside of his vehicle where practical and take a position of safety with the motorist. Officers should stop far enough behind the disabled vehicle, so that the vehicle will not cause damage to the departmental vehicle when it is being moved.
 
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 CRUISING PATROL 10-7
PADDY WAGON MAKES IT'S LAST 10-14 RUN

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wrecked Baltimore Police Car

Photo courtesy Officer Bill Edgar

wrecked Baltimore Police Car2
Photo courtesy Officer Bill Edgar

Several wrecked Baltimore Police vehicles sit on a storage lot at the Dickman Street garage

Devider

NOTICE

POLICE INFORMATION

Copies of: Your Baltimore Police Department Class Photo, Pictures of our Officers, Vehicles, Equipment, Newspaper Articles relating to our department and or officers, Old Departmental Newsletters, Lookouts, Wanted Posters, and or Brochures. Information on Deceased Officers and anything that may help Preserve the History and Proud Traditions of this agency. Please contact Retired Detective Kenny Driscoll. How to Dispose of Old Police Items  If you come into possession of Police items from an Estate or Death of a Police Officer Family Member and do not know how to properly dispose of these items please contact: Retired Detective Ken Driscoll - Please dispose of POLICE Items: Badges, Guns, Uniforms, Documents, PROPERLY so they won’t be used IMPROPERLY.

  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.his email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

DeviderAnyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook by clicking HERE pics can be mailed to Baltimore City Police History - 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

 

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll

Kathleen Irwin Conrad

Thursday, 23 April 2020 01:38

Kathleen Irwin Conrad
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14 March 2003

Anne Arundel
Police Say Assault Measure is Needed
14 March 2003
They Asked the Senate to Make Attack on Officer a Felony House Has Passed a Bill
Sun Staff Julie Bykowicz

A 54 second arrest attempt ended Kathleen Irwin’s 11 year career as a Baltimore police officer and left her bedridden and in a full body brace for months.

The drunken man who shoved her into a metal shelving unit ruptured a disc in her lower back, was charged with a misdemeanor and sentenced to 18 months of unsupervised probation.

This legislative session, police officers have stepped up their efforts for passage of a bill that would make assaulting an officer a felony. After four consecutive years of failure, the bill has made it further than ever this year.

“It is my belief that if I were able to charge this suspect as a felon, he would’ve gotten a more appropriate penalty,” Irwin told state senators this week at a hearing of the Senate judicial proceedings committee.

The house version of the bill passed 134 to 0 last week, and it Senate twin has 22 cosponsors of it makes it out of committee, the bill will need a simple majority of 24 votes in the Senate to head to the governor’s desk.

“This will give police officers one more weapon in their arsenal,” said O’Brien Atkinson, president of the Anne Arundel County fraternal order of police.

“A lot of seriousness goes along with being a convicted felon, and criminals know that.” Marilyn ranks fourth in the nation for assaults on law enforcement officers, with about 29 out of 100 officers assaulted in the line of duty each year

Of the 3947 officers assaulted in 2001, 572 were seriously injured, according to the latest uniform crime report available.

Officers say the current felony assault law, which requires intent, does not work for them because their injuries are more often the result of someone struggling to escape custody then from someone deliberately trying to hurt them.

Animal cruelty laws make it an automatic felony to assault the police dog, something law enforcement officers repeatedly pointed out at Tuesday’s hearing.

“Worthy of no less”

“Surely the men and women who protect you are worthy of no less consideration,” Anne Arundel County Sheriff George F. Johnson the fourth said during the hearing.

Anne Arundel County law enforcement agencies and unions who were closest to the state capital. Have campaigned hard for the bill, showing up in droves each time there is action on it.

Sen. Janet Greenup, and Anne Arundel County Republican, introduced a bill in January. She said a heavily amended version of her Bill addressed the concerns of some of her fellow legislators that every scuffle with police might qualify as a felony assault. The bill excludes “minor, temporary injuries.”

Greenup began pushing for the bill last year as a delicate when it failed to make it out of committee, she brought it to the floor as an amendment to a crime bill.

“People are finally waking up to the fact that we need these policeman, and we need to protect them in any way that we can,” Greenup said

Staunch Oposition

The bills staunchest opponent have been defense attorneys, who say putting law enforcement officers into a special category could drive a wedge between police officers in the community they serve.

Testifying against the bill Tuesday, Stanley D. Jenner, a public defender in Baltimore, said it is “against public policy, this appropriate disproportionate and unnecessary.” Prosecutors on the bill. Douglas F. Gansler, the Montgomery County State’s Attorney, spoke in favor of the bill. William M teeth, and Anne Arundel prosecutor who tracks legislation for the Maryland state attorneys Association criticized it. “The community better looking long and hard before it passes this bill,” he said among his objections, he said is a fear that bumping into a police officer could be categorized as a felony. Greenup said her Bill makes it clear that such minor incidents would not qualify.

Gift favored a measure introduced by Sen. John A Giannetti Junior, a Prince George County Democrat, that instead of creating a separate assault category for law enforcement officers would add five years to first – and second – degree assault sentence says when the person assaults and officer.

Steve said the Marilyn states attorneys Association endorses unities bill.

Most law enforcement professionals at the hearing did not endorse and is bill, saying their flight to make assaulting an officer a more serious crime is aimed more at preventing than at increasing sentences.

“When someone is disorderly, we want to be able to look at them and say, “you assault me and it’s a felony,” Atkinson said

20 February, 1993 12:03 PM police officer Kathy Irwin was chasing a shoplifter when the shoplifter turned and pushed her into some shelves which eventually turned fell on top of Officer Irwin causing a serious back injury which later needed surgery to area C for of her spinal cord forcing her retirement in 1995

deviders Line of duty injured

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll

Gary Provenzano

Thursday, 23 April 2020 00:44

Gary Provenzano

Shortly before graduating from college in 1974, Officer Provenzano applied to BNDD (Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs) This was the predecessor of DEA. He knew a guy on the job that told him about the exam and how to apply. Gary took the exam and scored 86. Only 7% of the people that took the exam even got a passing score of 70. Gary and his friend were in. Gary kept waiting-and heard nothing. Finally he was  told by the bureau that they would only be hiring women and minorities in that group. They said the best thing to do was to try and get into a major city police dept. to add his resume. So, Gary wrote a "form letter" that said, "I'm moving to your city, what are the requirements to join the Police Dept." He then hand signed each letter and sent copies to virtually every major US city, NY, LA, Chicago, Baltimore, Atlanta, Dallas - everywhere.

Before long he had received a response from every one he had written. Some weren't hiring, some had residency requirements prior to hiring, etc. There were two choices Baltimore and LA. LA waved the entrance exam because he had a degree. When he called out there, the guy in personnel told him that an interview would pretty much be a formality, with his degree Gary knew he'd get the job. Baltimore told him to come down and that as an out of state applicant, they could process him in one day - written exam, psych exam, interview, the works. Gary would have to had been at Headquarters by 8 am and the process would take all day.

This was 1975. At that time round trip to LA was $300, Baltimore was only $75. Gary's girlfriend at the time (now his wife) decided to check out Baltimore first. The pair came to Baltimore for a week's vacation during that stay Gary had completed the hiring process in or day as promised.

Before he ever had a chance to go to LA, Gary was hired by Baltimore. Now is a good time to point out that Gary had no desire to be a uniform officer, it was merely a stepping stone. But like most, before he knew what hit him, he had fallen in love with the job and the City. We all know Baltimore ain't pretty. So when people used to ask him why, he used to say that Baltimore was sort of like a sexy, sleazy lady, he knew she wasn't good for him, but he just couldn't let her go. I think most city police have met this lady, fallen in love and couldn't leave her.
 

By the way, years later the DEA sent Gary a letter and offering him a job - He would have been an undercover agent in New York City. By then he had married that girlfriend that had traveled with him since the beginning, and stands by his side to this day. With a wife and son at the time he was forced to turn down The DEA's offer, and continue his job as a uniformed police officer.

 

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deviders ever on thr watch shadow

 

 Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222 - Rolland Fullen



Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll

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