Tuesday, 23 March 2021 00:40

Sgt. Edward M. Sawyer

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Sgt. Edward M. Sawyer
 
E. M. Sawyer Dies at Work
 
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Dec 12, 1956
 
Had been officer 22 years Sgt. Edward M. Sawyer, a member the Baltimore Police Department for 22 years, died suddenly yesterday as he worked on the automobile of the police Commissioner in the garage near headquarters. He was 50 years old.
 
Sgt. Sawyer, who had been chauffeur for three commissioners, was polishing automobile used by Commissioner James M Hepbron when he collapsed. He was pronounced dead on arrival to mercy hospital.
A native of Baltimore, Sgt. Sawyer was appointed to the department in June, 1934. His first assignment was to the motorcycle traffic division. He was made the commissioners over during the ministration of Hamilton Atkinson. Later he served in the late Commissioner Beverly Ober and continued on the job under Mr. Hepbron.
He was made a Sgt. in March, 1948.
 
Baseball Career
 
Before joining the Police Department, Mr. Sawyer was a shortstop in professional baseball, playing in Frederick, Maryland. And Birmingham Alabama before going into police work.
Funeral services will be held Friday at the John Jay. Going and Sun establishment at Hollins and Poppleton streets. The hour for the service had not been set last night. Sgt. Sawyer is survived by his wife, Mrs. Mary Sawyer; a son Edward F. Sawyer; a brother Morton; and three sisters, Mrs. Selma Mills, Mrs. Hilda Johnson and Mrs. Mildred Smith, all of Baltimore
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