Broken Windows Theory

Thursday, 14 May 2020 05:48 Written by

Baltimore Police Department
Broken Windows Theory

The Broken Windows Theory, is an academic theory proposed by James Q. Wilson and George Kelling in 1982 that used broken windows as a metaphor for disorder within neighborhoods. Their theory links disorder and rudeness within a community to subsequent occurrences of crime. First small nuisances that will become small crimes, and small crimes become big crimes.

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Broken windows was developed by two academics, but it was never offered as an academic theory in the peer-reviewed journals.  It emerged as a piece in Atlantic Monthly, a somewhat sophisticated magazine.  The theory is been much maligned in the media of late because it has been conflated with some terrible ideas and racist practices such as “zero tolerance policing” and “stop and frisk” tactics.  The actual application of the theory to neighborhood policing dictates a specific type of partnership between police and citizens that would, if implemented properly, improve relationships between citizens and police.  The major flaw of the theory seems to be that it is an oversimplification of a complex set of social phenomena, and thus lacks much empirical support.

Since criminologist George L. Kelling and his coauthor James Q. Wilson published their “broken windows” more than 30 years ago, it has become a sort of “standard” theoretical explanation of why community policing is a good idea.  It was quickly taken up by several major police departments, including the LAPD, as part of community policing. It called for the building of police and community partnerships that would seek to prevent local crime and to create order. The basic logic was the simple premise that interrupting minor offenses before they could snowball and open the door to serious crimes, including violent crimes. 

At the core of the Broken Windows thesis is that incivilities beget further incivilities, and the severity of the incivilities gets worse over time.  At some point, the mere incivilities evolve into serious crime if the causal chain is not broken. It is important to note that Broken Windows does not suggest how problems should be solved, and it certainly never specifies that arrest is always the most appropriate tool.  Heavy-handed tactics like New York’s “stop and frisk” program cannot be reconciled with Broken Windows, nor with the problem-oriented approach that is often found in conjunction with it.

Prior to the advancement of various incivility theories such as broken windows, policing scholars and the police themselves tended to focus on serious crime.  The major concern was always with crimes that were perceived to be the most serious and consequential for the victim, such as rape, robbery, and murder. Wilson and Kelling viewed the crime problem from a different, more holistic vantage point. They saw “serious crime” as the ultimate outcome of a much longer chain of neighborhood phenomena, theorizing that crime stemmed from “disorder,” and that if disorder dissipated, then serious crimes would not occur.

The link between disorder and crime was theorized to be mediated by fear of crime, an important social variable in its own right.  Wilson and Kelling’s theory further postulates that the proliferation of disorder creates fear in the minds of citizens who are persuaded that the neighborhood is unsafe.  The fear of crime, which can range in intensity from a slight unease to a debilitating fear of victimization, causes residents to withdraw behind closed doors in order to remain safe. This withdrawal from the community weakens social controls that previously kept criminals in check. Once this process begins, the theory suggests, it tends to start a destructive feedback loop. Neighborhood disorder causes crime, and crime encourages yet more disorder and crime.  

A major aspect of the popularity of Broken Windows is the fact that it creates a theoretical framework for police practice.  Most criminological theories support changes in macro-level social policy rather than police policy within the framework of community policing. Earlier social disorganization theories offered solutions that were highly political, costly to develop and implement, and would take a long time to demonstrate any effectiveness.  These theoretical causes of neighborhood problems and crime are more appropriate to legislatures than they are to police departments. Broken Windows theory is seen by many as a way to institute rapid neighborhood-level change with minimal expense by simply altering the police crime-control strategy. It is far easier and less costly to attack “disorder” than it is to assail such daunting social ills as poverty and deficient education.  

References

Kelling, G. L. & Wilson, J. Q. (1982). Broken Windows:  The police and neighborhood safety.  The Atlantic.

Credit to author Adam J. McKee, Ph.D.

From <https://www.docmckee.com/WP/oer/criminology/criminology-section-6-4/

 

 
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Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll 

Patrolman Edward Myers

Sunday, 15 March 2020 02:43 Written by

Biography of Edward Myers
A Baltimore City Policeman

Edward Myers was born in Baltimore, Maryland at 4:00 AM on 11 October 1812, five months after war was declared against England. Edward was the fourth child and second son of Charles Myers (spelled Meyer) and Mary "Polly" Wagner (spelled Waggoner) of York County, Pennsylvania. Pages from the Myers Family Bible, at one time in the possession of now deceased cousin William Slaughter of Richmond, Virginia, list in the handwriting of Mary “Polly” (Wagner) Myers all of her children with specific dates and times of birth or christening.

What may have happened while Edward Myers was growing up in the Federal Hill and Baltimore Harbor area? On 27 February 1821, General Andrew Jackson arrived in Baltimore from Philadelphia and his approach was announced by discharges of artillery from a detachment of Captain Wilson's Independent Blues, stationed on Federal Hill. Edward Myers likely heard or witnessed the artillery fire as a nine-year-old. From 7 to 11 October 1824, the Revolutionary War hero, French General Lafayette, made a return visit (since 1781) to Baltimore and Edward Myers as a twelve-year-old may have witnessed the extensive celebrations in the city. Four ships fully dressed with flags and streamers sailed into the harbor to greet the General, his son Washington Lafayette, and U.S. Secretary of State, John Quincy Adams. On 13 October 1824, two days after Lafayette's departure, Edward Myers' younger brother, Ferdinand Myers, was born in Baltimore. On 6 April 1826, Edward Myers' younger sister, Julia Myers, was christened by Reverend Daniel Kurtz of Zion German Lutheran Church on Gay Street and Court House Plaza. Ferdinand Myers was christened nearly seven years after his birth on 1 June 1831, also by Reverend Daniel Kurtz. Edward Myers in 1842 lived on South Charles Street, north of Barre Street, according to the Baltimore City Directory.

On 23 May 1846, an enthusiastic crowd assembled in Monument Square of Baltimore City to support the annexation of Texas and the war that followed. Reverdy Johnson, General Sam Houston, and William Yancey, a member of Congress from Alabama, all addressed the Baltimore audience. On 1 June 1846, First Lieutenant John R. Kenly of the Eagle Artillery Company of Baltimore began recruiting a company of volunteers for the Mexican War, after first meeting with President James K. Polk in Washington, D.C., and then with Lieutenant Colonel William H. Watson, the newly appointed commander of the Baltimore and Washington, D.C. Battalion. On 2 June 1846, Kenly opened a rendezvous in the armory of the Eagle Artillery Company, and another at Trades' Union Hall, corner of Baltimore Street and Triplett's Alley. According to Kenly, volunteers came in with extraordinary rapidity. On 4 June 1846, Kenly carried to the city of Washington by railroad two officers and 58 men, the whole having been recruited by Kenly in less than 36 hours. Prior to leaving his rendezvous on Baltimore Street, Kenly was honored and gratified by being presented with a sword and sash by Captain George P. Kane, the commanding officer, on behalf of the Eagle Artillery Company, with which Kenly had been connected as a private and officer for several years. On reaching Washington, Kenly and his new recruits were met by the volunteers from Baltimore who had preceded them. Kenly and his recruits were escorted to the War Department, and from there they marched to the Marine Barracks, where the recruits were assigned quarters. Kenly received his commission as Captain from Thomas G. Pratt, Governor of Maryland, that same day.

Edward Myers enlisted for one year of military service on 4 June 1846 as a Private with Captain John R. Kenly's Company E in the Baltimore and Washington, D.C. Battalion. Edward Myers was described in his enlistment and pension records as being 5 feet 4 inches tall, of light complexion, dark eyes, dark hair, and by occupation a baker. On 5 June 1846, Captain Kenly sent two of his officers, Lieutenants Francis B. Schaeffer and Oden Bowie (later Governor of Maryland and for whom Odenton was named), back to Baltimore to bring more men, who were reportedly anxious to join Kenly's company. On 8 June 1846, Kenly's company, known as "Baltimore's Own," marched back to the War Department, where members of the company were mustered into the service of the United States by Lorenzo Thomas, Major and Assistant Adjutant-General United States Army, for 12 months of service. The company consisted of three officers and 84 non-commissioned officers and privates.

On 10 June 1846, the Baltimore and Washington, D.C. Battalion was ordered by the Secretary of War to leave the Marine Barracks, where it had been quartered, to Fort Washington, on the banks of the Potomac River, seven miles below the town of Alexandria. The cause of the unexpected order was an application from the Mayor of the City of Washington, who had been incensed at the bad behavior of some of the men, and who, as it was alleged, "had entered into a personal quarrel with them, in which it well may be supposed, he was not much the gainer." On 13 June 1846, the Battalion left Fort Washington and embarked on board the steamer Powhatan, and at 8:00 PM arrived alongside the steamer Massachusetts, lying in the river, which had been chartered by the Government to convey the Battalion and a large amount of stores to Point Isabel on the Gulf of Mexico. Kenly indicated in his diary that it had been raining hard all day and suddenly five hundred men were thrown upon a steamer of seven hundred tons' burden, whose hold and deck were covered with forage and other military stores. A scene of indescribable confusion ensued, which the darkness seemed to swell and magnify, and no repose was had on that night of chaos, except that which was obtained through pure exhaustion.

From 20 to 24 September 1846, Edward Myers fought at the Battle of Monterrey in Mexico. From December 1846 until at least April 1847, Edward Myers performed extra duty in Mexico as a baker for his battalion. According to the military service records from the National Archives for Edward Myers, he was billed by the Army $1.22 for a pair of lost Army brogans, 56 cents for a lost white bayonet scabbard belt, and 10 cents for a bayonet scabbard free plate. Edward Myers was discharged on 30 May 1847 in Tampico, Mexico and returned to Baltimore.

On 20 November 1848, Edward Myers was married in Baltimore, Maryland by Reverend Reese to Mary A. Flahart. Four children were born to this marriage: Henrietta, born 21 March 1849, Julia, Alexander, born 6 May 1853, and Edward Myers, all in Baltimore. Mary A. (Flahart) Myers died in the 1850's in Baltimore and Edward Myers was married a second time on 30 April 1866 by Reverend Burnette (also spelled Burnet) of the Baptist Church in Baltimore to Mary Elizabeth Stall, the daughter of the recently deceased Andrew J. Stall (who died 17 September 1862, Battle of Antietam) and Mary Ann Waters Roberts of Baltimore. Three children were born to this couple: Robert Charles Myers, Henry Russell Myers, and Lucy C. Myers. Edward Myers in 1851 was a baker by trade and lived on Parkin Street, south of Lombard Street. He moved to Charles Street between Hamburg and Cross Streets in 1853.

After Edward Myers became a policeman in 1853, assigned to the Southern District in Baltimore, and many of his encounters while on duty with unruly individuals in the city were recorded in history in the form of newspaper articles, as follows:

In a 4 May 1853 Baltimore Sun article: “In early May 1853, about 12:00 on Monday night, whilst Watchman Myers of the Southern District was going his round, he discovered on fire a building in Spring Court, two doors from Charles Street, and succeeded in extinguishing the flames before much damage was sustained.”

In a 25 January 1854 Baltimore Sun article: “Riotous Conduct: Jeremiah Simpson, on the charge of riotous conduct at Camden Station, was arrested by Watchman Edward Myers, and committed to jail by Justice Pennington, in default of security to answer before court.”

In a 16 June 1854 Baltimore Sun article: “Rescued from Drowning: About 1:00 yesterday morning, whilst Watchman Myers was going his round, he heard a man struggling in the water at Light Street Wharf. He hurried to the spot and succeeded in saving the life of the man, who was from the Eastern Shore, and who fell overboard whilst attempting to board a vessel.”

In a 6 July 1854 Baltimore Sun article: “Dreadful Railroad Accident, Awful Loss of Life, 28 Person Killed, 50 or 60 Persons Wounded” - Edward Myers was mentioned three times as Southern District Watchman, Mexican War veteran, or resident of 216 Barre Street. Edward Myers was seriously injured in this Baltimore and Susquehanna Railroad train accident nine miles from Baltimore City. George Butler, his travel companion and also a Mexican War veteran, pulled Edward Myers out of the wreckage and saved his life. The newspaper article stated how surprised authorities were that Edward Myers survived.

In a 27 December 1854 Baltimore Sun article: “George Sahn was arrested by Officer Myers, and was charged with assaulting and beating Catharine Wollen. George Sahn was committed for court by Justice Auld.”

In a 5 April 1855 Baltimore Sun article: “Passing Counterfeit Money: Jacob Wyre was arrested by Watchman Myers upon the charge of passing a five dollar bank bill on the Bank of Commerce, and which proved to be a counterfeit. Justice Lawder committed him to jail in default of security for a further examination.”

In a 15 January 1857 Baltimore Sun article: “Incendiarism: Watchman Myers of the Southern District, whilst going his rounds on Tuesday morning, discovered that the house on the corner of Perry and Hanover Streets had been forced open and then set on fire under the stairway, which Watchman Myers promptly extinguished.”

In an 11 March 1857 Baltimore Sun article: “S. Leonard was arrested by Officers Myers and Poulton upon the charge of assaulting and beating Aquilla Christopher. S. Leonard was held to bail to answer at court by Justice Webb.”

In a 14 April 1857 Baltimore Sun article: “William Bryan and Lawrence Buck were arrested by officers Myers and Poulton on the charge of throwing bricks in the street. Justice Webb fined them each one dollar with costs, and committed them to jail in default of security to keep quiet for six months.”

In a 30 May 1857 Baltimore Sun article: “About 1 o’clock on Friday morning, Officer Myers of the Southern District discovered a man sitting upon the curbstone in Pratt Street. Officer Myers accosted him, and by his incoherent replies, concluded the man was under the influence of liquor, as he appeared very drowsy. With assistance, the man was carried toward the Southern Station but died before his bearers could arrive there. His name is unknown and nothing was found upon his person by which his name or residence could be learned. Coroner Benson was sent for and he held an inquest over the body, and the jury rendered a verdict of death by intoxication.”

In a 14 August 1857 Baltimore Sun article: “Andrew Hackett was arrested by Officer Myers and was charged with exposing his person in the Hanover Market. Justice Webb committed him for court.”

In a 12 December 1857 Baltimore Sun article: “On Thursday night, Officers Myers and Coulton (previously named as Poulton) of the Southern District, arrested Mark Silverstine, a manufacturer of hats, on a charge of setting fire to his store, No. 171 West Pratt Street, an account of the partial burning of which appeared in our last issue. At first, the fire was supposed to have originated from the accident, but something excited suspicion against him and caused his arrest. He was examined before Justice Boyd, who in default of security, committed him to jail to await the reaction of the grand jury.”

 

     In a 6 April 1858 Baltimore Sun article:     

6 April 1858 Baltimore Sun article

     In a 17 July 1858 Baltimore Sun article: 

17 July 1858 Baltimore Sun article  In a 3 November 1858 Baltimore Sun article:    

3 November 1858 Baltimore Sun article

     In a 23 April 1859 Baltimore Sun article:

23 April 1859 Baltimore Sun article

     In a 2 January 1860 Baltimore Sun article:

2 January 1860 Baltimore Sun article

     In a 28 June 1861 Baltimore Sun article:  

28 June 1861 Baltimore Sun article copy 2  In a 3 July 1861 Baltimore Sun article:

3 July 1861 Baltimore Sun article

     In a 23 September 1861 Baltimore Sun article:

23 September 1861 Baltimore Sun article

    In a 24 June 1863 Baltimore Sun article:

24 June 1863 Baltimore Sun article

24 June 1863 Baltimore Sun article 

As was stated earlier, Edward and his family moved in 1854 to 216 Barre Street. His son by his second marriage, Henry Russell Myers, lived at this same address in 1888. By the late 1850s Edward Myers lived at 26 Ross Street, where his mother resided, and until the end of the Civil War was working as a policeman, and at the beginning of the Civil War, for Union Colonel John R. Kenly, his former company commander during the Mexican War. Colonel Kenly was the Provost Marshal of Baltimore at that time. Edward Myers' mother died at the 26 Ross Street address in 1860.

Retired General John R. Kenly kept a diary during the Mexican War and had it published in 1873 by Lippincott of Philadelphia, entitled Memoirs of a Maryland Volunteer, War With Mexico, 1846-1848. In this rare book, which was located at the historic Peabody Library in Baltimore, are incredible details of the entire military campaign in northern Mexico, including every imaginable experience by the soldiers of this company, including one instance when Captain Kenly's company met commanding General Zachary Taylor, later to become President Taylor.

Some years later, Edward Myers worked as a laborer in South Baltimore and his last residence was 673 Hanover Street when he died on 8 September 1884. Edward's son, Robert Charles Myers, lived at the 673 Hanover Street address in 1883. Edward Myers died of pneumonia, which he had for three weeks, according to his death certificate. Edward was buried on 10 September 1884 in Cedar Hill Cemetery, Section A, Lot 73, in northern Anne Arundel County, Maryland. His medical attendant was Dr. J. C. Burch of 151 Hanover Street and the undertaker was William G. Tiellner of 65 South Eutaw Street. On 14 March 1887, attorney Patrick O'Farrell of 110 67th Street N.W. Washington, D.C. prosecuted the pension claim for widowed Mary E. Myers, who lived at the time at 611 Little Paca Street in Baltimore.

On 25 March 1887, Henry Russell Myers and Henrietta Slaughter signed affidavits as witnesses to their acquaintance with and relationship to the deceased Edward Myers. Daughter Henrietta (Myers) Slaughter, the wife of Washington Lafayette Slaughter, stated that she was present at the marriage ceremony in 1866 when her father Edward Myers and Mary Elizabeth Stall were married. By 2 November 1887, widow Mary E. Myers was living at 533 South Paca Street, according to the pension record. John R. Kenly, as a retired Major General in the United States Army in 1887, signed an affidavit and was a witness to Edward Myers' service in Kenly’s company during the Mexican War. Also in 1887, Mary E. Myers claimed that she did not know if her deceased husband Edward Myers received the 160 acres of bounty land to which he was entitled by law. Her attorney noted that there was no record of bounty land being granted.

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Copies of: Your Baltimore Police Department Class Photo, Pictures of our Officers, Vehicles, Equipment, Newspaper Articles relating to our department and or officers, Old Departmental Newsletters, Lookouts, Wanted Posters, and or Brochures. Information on Deceased Officers and anything that may help Preserve the History and Proud Traditions of this agency. Please contact Retired Detective Kenny Driscoll.

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Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department.

Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

 

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll 

Sgt. Lee Rodgers

Saturday, 14 March 2020 12:55 Written by

Sgt. Lee Rodgers

50Photo Courtesy of Mark Rodgers
Sgt Lee Rodgers

36Photo Courtesy of Mark Rodgers

32Photo Courtesy of Mark Rodgers

34Photo Courtesy of Mark Rodgers

33Photo Courtesy of Mark Rodgers

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Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department.

Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll

Lieutenant Detective John E Klein

Sgt Klein

Lieutenant Detective John E. Klein became a member of the Baltimore Police Department in 1899 as a Probationary Patrolman by 1901 he was promoted to Patrolman (Number 10 on a list of near 50 Officers, with a score of 94.5 on his test)

Lieut. John E. Klein, died at age 66, he lived in Arnold, Anne Arundel county, and was by this time retired from  the Baltimore Police Department's Detective bureau, he passed away from an illness he had for only two months. He was the son of John L. Klein, also of this city, and the late Katherine E. Klein. John became a probationary patrolman in 1899. Five years later he was made Sergeant in which capacity he served until he was named to the Detective bureau as a lieutenant in 1921. He continued to work as a plain clothes man up until his retirement in August, 1926. He made his home with his sister, Miss Minnie Klein, in Arnold. Beside his father, he was survived by two sisters Misses Minnie and Lillian Klein, and a brother, Charles F. Klein. Funeral services were held at the chapel, Eutaw Place and Lanvale street, on Saturday at 2 P. M. Interment was in Loudon Park Cemetery, During his career he was involved in capturing the men responsible for the double murder of Vincent Montealto and Jacob Goodle, Jacob was 65 when he was murdered in his bed, by a man with a hatchet. Det. Klein worked with Det William Jenkins and Sgt William Burns to identify a suspect using the newly founded fingerprint labs in Baltimore... they photographed the fingerprints, Things hadn't changed much over the years, for the first police on the scene used the murder weapon to hammer closed a window that used to gain entry into Goodle's room. Witnesses said Goodle had company earlier in the night a L. Brody of 732 S Charles St. He left, but was seen to return around 9:30 PM by Mrs Anders who said shortly after Brody's return, she heard pottering about his room. The suspect was arrested and convicted. In an unrelated Case involving the theft of nearly $1000.00 that was taken during the murder of William B Norris, when he was robbed of his payroll safe deposit box by a gang of bandits in 1922 on August the 22nd, the suspects took the money to a Mrs Hart so she could hid the money for them until things cooled over. This murder took place in Baltimore, but led detectives both North and South of the city, as North as New York, and as far south as Washington Dc. but they got their suspects, when Detectives Cooney, Mintiens and Klein recovered the money in Washington Dc with one suspect and then two more suspect in New York.. In 1921 Det Klein would receive two Awards for his cases, his ability to get confessions, and close cases. In 1922 Lt Det Klein would receive two more awards, and in 1924, he would receive two more awards... There were times when he and his partners would rack up 6 awards or more in a year, they seemed to put down cases, between fingerprint hits and confessions, they knew how to close cases.. never leaving a stone upturned, in cases where it seemed nothing would turn up as for evidence, they would do door to door and talk to everyone until they found a witness that either saw something, or would point them in the right direction. Lieutenant Detective John Klein retired in August of 1926 with more than 11 official commendation. One of his favorite tools as a detective, the Black Jack/Slap Jack, easily slips into the pocket and can be used to bring down a murderer without having to kill him.

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If you come into possession of Police items from an Estate or Death of a Police Officer Family Member and do not know how to properly dispose of these items please contact: Retired Detective Ken Driscoll - Please dispose of POLICE Items: Badges, Guns, Uniforms, Documents, PROPERLY so they won’t be used IMPROPERLY. 

Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department.

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Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll

Sergeant Ed Mattson

Monday, 02 March 2020 00:37 Written by

Sergeant Ed Mattson

Ed Mattson saw Baltimore's 1968 riots in person, and he watched the recent Freddie Gray riots on TV. He's still struggling to understand both.

 

He's canoed the Amazon from Peru to Brazil, wrestled a 20-foot anaconda, sumited mountains, and jumped out of planes. But there's one thing retired Baltimore police sergeant Ed Mattson hasn't done.

"I can never truly say I had a black friend. Even today."

Mattson sits and speaks at the kitchen table of the suburban Baltimore home that he and his wife have filled with 19th century children's books and antique oil paintings. His blazer hangs over a chair, an award on its lapel for his service during Baltimore's 1968 riots. As the Freddie Gray case and its aftermath have captured worldwide attention over the past several weeks, and the U.S. Justice Department has launched an investigation into Mattson's former department—the one that gave him that award and several others—Mattson has had much on his mind.

Recently, while grocery shopping, Mattson overheard a woman discussing the Freddie Gray riots. "She said, 'You know, I was never racist or anti-black, but I am now,'" Mattson says. "And I thought: WowThis."

"I'll be truthful with you," he says, "I know guys that—is racist the right word? Or they just don't understand other people? I think the bulk of [officers] are honest, hardworking men that just go to work and do a job. I'm sure they don't go and say, 'Now today we're gonna go out and beat up a black guy.' I know this doesn't happen."

Thousands of protesters, in Baltimore and beyond, see the situation differently.

"I know guys that—is racist the right word? Or they just don't understand other people?"

Mattson grew up in East Baltimore, born into a family of Italian factory workers. In the late '40s and early '50s, Mattson remembers, "Baltimore was like Mayberry." Everyone he knew lived in row homes, and the community had a small town feel. Policemen would threaten to tell your father on you, and kids intent on mischief would follow the lamplighter on his rounds through the neighborhood, turning off the gaslights he'd lit one by one. Both Mattson's grandfather and great-grandfather had been bootleggers and owned speakeasies during Prohibition. He came of age in an all-white neighborhood, graduated from an all-white high school, and served in a nearly all-white Marine Corps.

"We thought life for everybody was good," Mattson says. "It was America, man. The war's over, prosperity's here! But then came Lyndon Baines Johnson with his Great Society, where he wanted to help the downtrodden. When you're young, you don't see downtrodden." But after his stint in the Marines, Mattson came home to Baltimore, and started working as police officer—a white beat cop in primarily black neighborhoods.

"And I realized there were downtrodden people, there were people who didn't rise up," he says. "And I just used to look at it and say, 'Why is it like that?'"

Walking his beat in the early 1960s, Mattson says he did not perceive racial tension. Mostly, his job meant taking care of "humbles" (minor crimes, like loitering), and caring for people as he found them. He did see more of "the seamier side of life" than he'd noticed in his own neighborhood (more drug use, more public drunkenness), and he wondered why the black middle class seemed so small, compared to the white communities he knew.

"You went out on house calls, and there'd be two or three babies who have no milk," he says. "And you'd take it out of your money, out of your pocket, and buy them milk and bread. All the cops I knew did that."

Baltimore, 1968.
Baltimore, 1968.
Getty Images

But by the late '60s, the country was rapidly changing, and Mattson underwent riot training.

After Martin Luther King Jr. was shot, Baltimore exploded. By the third night of rioting, Mattson says, the police were under attack with everything from bullets to Molotov cocktails. "The firemen would come, and they would shoot at the firemen," he says. "And I thought: I could understand shooting at the police. I could really fathom that. But I couldn't understand [attacking] the firemen or the ambulance service, cause they are there strictly to help.

"It was just constant, it never ended: morning, noon, and night," he says. "All the food stores were burnt out. All the liquor stores were burnt out, the clothing stores. There's whole blocks of it that are gone. It looks like Berlin after we bombed it in World War II."

Of Mattson's nearly two decades on the force, those days meant the most to him.

"I saw incredible acts of heroism by guys I worked with—pulling people out of burning buildings, saving lives," he says. "The Baltimore Police saved Baltimore in 1968, there's no doubt about it. The Guard didn't do very much, State Police didn't. The Army came in; they didn't do it. We did it."

After the riots, Mattson went back to his old beat. But his daily foot patrol led him through a different Baltimore.

"People started hatin' each other," he says. "It was like a cloud hung over the city. It just seemed like the friendliness was gone—the trust—on both sides. I couldn't understand how they could burn our city down. And I guess they couldn't understand how I couldn't understand how they could burn our city down."

Last month's violence hit a much narrower swath of Baltimore, and community organizing within those neighborhoods has drawn broad support. Cleanup efforts have spanned racial and economic divides, and social media has helped to democratize protest and storytelling. Last week, CVS corporate announced plans to rebuild its burnt-out and looted locations.

Police form a line near Baltimore's Mondawmin Mall on April 27, 2015.
Police form a line near Baltimore's Mondawmin Mall on April 27, 2015.
Brendan Smialowski/AFPGetty Images

Mattson says the recent riots are an example of what he thinks has gone wrong with policing since his time on the force. He and his wife watched as Mondawmin Mall was looted on live TV. "There were no police officers there," he says. "I said to my wife, 'Why aren't the cops responding to this?' And then we found out why: Cause they were told to stand down. In our day, that would've never happened."

But some things haven't changed. That video of Gray's arrest, where he's dragged to the wagon? "That's just normal," Mattson says. "Typical arrest. People fight you in battle, or resist you—you gotta strong-arm em." He also recognizes State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby's description of what investigators believe happened to Freddie Gray in the van as "bouncing."

"Should they have seatbelted him in?" Mattson asks. "Probably. Should they have restrained him more? Probably. Should they have took him to the hospital? I'm sure they should have. But it didn't happen, and so you got this.

"And poor Freddie Gray's going to be made a martyr. But Freddie Gray's not exactly a martyr, you know? He's dead, is what he is. And you feel sorry for him. But also, I feel sorry for the other eight guys that got killed [in Baltimore] last week by gunfire, not by police officers."

Mattson spent his career on one side of the system. So he knows that system is flawed.

"Everybody's guilty 'til proven innocent, you know that; it ain't the reverse of that," Mattson says. "I tell my grandsons: 'Do not get involved in the criminal justice system. It's an oxymoron. There's no such thing as 'criminal justice.' Once you get your foot in, your whole body goes in. You're involved forever."

More than half a century after Mattson tried to keep the peace in his smoldering city, he has an idea as to why it burned, both in 1968, and again this spring. It comes down to one thing, really.

"They feel like they're left out of society. You want to make somebody mad? Ignore 'em. And that's what we've done."

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POLICE INFORMATION

Copies of: Your Baltimore Police Department Class Photo, Pictures of our Officers, Vehicles, Equipment, Newspaper Articles relating to our department and or officers, Old Departmental Newsletters, Lookouts, Wanted Posters, and or Brochures. Information on Deceased Officers and anything that may help Preserve the History and Proud Traditions of this agency. Please contact Retired Detective Kenny Driscoll.

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NOTICE

How to Dispose of Old Police Items

If you come into possession of Police items from an Estate or Death of a Police Officer Family Member and do not know how to properly dispose of these items please contact: Retired Detective Ken Driscoll - Please dispose of POLICE Items: Badges, Guns, Uniforms, Documents, PROPERLY so they won’t be used IMPROPERLY.

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Sector Map

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Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department.

Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

 

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll

 

Capt. William J. Forrest

Friday, 21 February 2020 11:35 Written by

Capt. William J. Forrest

Sergeant William J Forrest   Sgt Wm. Forrest 1907 (The Father)

This was brought to me as if it was one person; turns out there are two entrance on duty dates, making this a father, son team.. Still the son, served nearly 50 years... 46 years and 8 months to be exact. To figure out when Inspector Forest began his career we'll work backwards from his "Final Roll Call" The Obituary listed in the Baltimore Sun, Mar of 1967- This may be the longest working police our department has ever had, (or so his nephew says) This could have been true at the time, as he did serve the near 46 years and retire at 70 years of age or greater. But better we have a son following in his dad's footsteps and doing what every father wants, he surpassed his father's great job on the force and went on to become one of the longest working police, making it from Patrol to Inspector, from a time when horses and wagons were used to a time when automobiles were used, and before he left the K9 unit was in affect.

There is an article where he was mentioned in 1897 when he was being considered for promotion to Sergeant, (At the time you had to have either 3 or 5 years in patrol to be considered for Sergeant, if we go with the lessor of the two and say 3 years, 1897 consideration would mean he may have been on since 1894. Bobby Brown looked into it for me and came up with a start date for the father of  1888, and was promoted in 1903 (1-12-1903) .

The father was mentioned in the Sun Paper in 1904, twice, both times he was Sergeant, the first was 30 May 1904 the second was 28 Oct 1904. He can be seen in the 1907 Blue Book "Baltimore Police History", he is pictured and was Sergeant.

In 1911 his son follows in his footsteps,  he was promoted to sergeant on 5-8-1918, and to Lieutenant on 6-1-1922. It is the son that appears in the paper in 1922 (article below) Sometime between the 1918 and 1922 date, Wm. J Forrest Jr was promoted to Round Sergeant. In 1946, the Sun Paper has the son William J Forrest Jr Listed as Captain, and in 1955 he is listed as Inspector. He retired in 1956, and passed away in 1967. During his time on the force Inspector William J Forrest Jr, was commended 4 times in 1922, 7 times in 1923, 4 times in 1924 and 1 time in 1925 for a total of 16 commendation of a 46 years career.

The Father and Son would show up in the news more than what you will find on this page, but these were some of the reports found, or sent to us... We'll try to separate the reports out so we'll know father from son. These articles, from 1922, 1930, 1946, 1955, 1956 and 1967 are all from the son's career. In the 1956 article, 21 Aug 56 to be exact - The report said the City was honoring Inspector Forrest at a luncheon. The Baltimore Sun began its report by first thanking the Inspector Forrest for his nearly 46 years faithful service” which would make the Inspector near 70 years of age at the time of his retirement.

Between Father and Son they saw major changes in law enforcement, a father coming on in 1888 when the Mounted unit was begun, and the Son retiring in 1956 when the K9 unit was founded. One saw the years of wagons and Bobby Caps, the saw motor vehicles, and what would become the best K9 unit in this country, perhaps the world. The things this family saw in law enforcement.

In 1967 The Sun Passed away, born in 1876, made him 91 at the time of his death. Survived by his wife, Nettie Lockwood Forrest; a daughter, Miss Frances Forrest two brothers, Julian I. Forrest who retired as a major in the Police Department, and Carroll Forrest; as well as a sister. Mrs. Helen Meyers, all of Baltimore. I am not sure how long he was on, but will include everything we have found and that was sent to me, so you can take a look for yourself.

The Following are reports of both the Father and the Son...

1967 – 5 Mar, 1967 A requiem high mass for William J. Forrest, a retired Baltimore city police inspector will be offend at 10 A.M; Tuesday at the Immaculate Conception Church, Baltimore and Ware avenues. Towson. Mr. Forrest. who lived at 333 Dixie Drive, Towson, died Friday night at Franklin Square Hospital after a stroke a month earlier. Mr. Forrest retired in 1956 as an inspector after 48 years in the Police Department. As inspector he commanded a number of police operations including be Southwestern, Southern Pres and Northwestern districts and the Pine Street station. Backed Foot Patrolman. A police administration or the old school Mr. Forrest argued that the foot patrolman was the nucleus of the police force. Unlike radio patrols, he said. Foot patrolmen have a personal knowledge or their beats. Inspector Forrest became a foot patrolman in 1911 and was promoted to sergeant, round sergeant, lieutenant and captain before being appointed an inspector in 1946. Formed the Sanitation Squad among his tasks as inspector was the organization of a sanitation squad to inspect rooming houses to see that they met standards of the city housing code. He received 9 commendations for arrests of murderers and burglars over his years with the Baltimore Police Department. His survivors include his wife, the former Nettie Lockwood; a daughter, Miss Frances Forrest two brothers, Julian I. Forrest who retired as a major in the Police Department and Carroll Forrest; and a sister. Mrs. Helen Meyers, all of Baltimore. (The Son)

1956 – The Baltimore Sun Paper wrote an article on the then retiring Inspector William J. Forrest Jr. in the article he is thanked for his nearly 46 years of “faithful” service. News reports from his time as a Police Sergeant, a Round Sergeant a Lieutenant, Captain, and finally Inspector, lets, keep track of those years… and well either have proof of a start date, or enough evidence to conclude his start date.  1st Sun paper’s report on the City’s honoring of Inspector Forrest at a luncheon, where on 21 August 1956 the Baltimore Sun begins its report by first thanking the Inspector Forrest for his nearly 46 years faithful service” they then introduce some of those in attendance, such as Mayor D’Alesandro, they also mention the police commissioner (James Hepbron) as being present, along with many other City and State officials, of varying ranks ranging from Patrolman, to Chief Inspector. The Ballroom of Emerson Hotel shortly past noon, on this day was filled to capacity. Inspector Forrest himself worked his way up through the ranks, and at age 70 (according to the paper) he is survived by no one who has been a Baltimore policeman longer.  Anselm Sodaro, State Attorney acted as Toastmaster at the head table, where the guest of Honor was flanked by his wife, and a daughter, Miss Frances Forrest. There was no "Principal speaker," but many a police official were expected to follow the Mayor in reminding the inspector that this was "his" day. A gift the nature of which was kept secret, was ready for the presentation. It was the result of contributions from every member of the police department. Jerome J. Sebastian. Auxiliary Bishop of Baltimore will offer the prayer. In charge of the arrangements for the luncheon was is Police Inspector by the name of Bernard J. Schmidt. (Side Note: Bernard Schmidt, who went on to become Baltimore’s Police Commissioner from 1961 to 1966... Early in PC Schmidt’s tenure as Police Commissioner he was in an elevator in the old Headquarters building when a young patrolman entered same; after a few floors the PC turns to young officer and asked if he knew who he was? The young man apologized, but said he did not know. PC Schmidt said it is OK, and that he understood. It wasn’t long after that day, in that elevator, that pictures of the Commissioner were hung in roll call rooms of all 9 districts so everyone would know what the PC looked like, a tradition started).  Anyway back to 1956… The luncheon was held and went off without a hitch… except for the line about 46 years’ service... - So let’s begin (The Son)

1955 – In 1955 the Sun Paper made a report on a Use of Force report against 2 Patrolman (9 Aug 1955) Inspector Forrest at the time (Listed as Police Inspector William J Forrest) it was reported that Inspector Forrest was assigned to investigate the charges that the two officers of the Southwestern administered a savage beating to a man they had arrested the Friday before 5 Aug 1955. The suspect was charged with disorderly conduct. The investigation reports made out by the accused patrolmen. Benjamin Leddon and Charles Butka, have not yet been supplied, Inspector Ford said. When all the official reports are in, he said, they will be made available to Inspector Forrest for use in his investigation. The alleged victim of the beating, John Minnick, 27 of the 1000 block of West Lombard Street, was arrested after police were called to break up an incipient fight at a tavern in the 1100 block of West Pratt Street. 1 Unmarked When He Got In Witnesses said the fight never developed, but! Minnick was! Arrested on the street outside. At a hearing in Southwestern Police Court Saturday morning it was stated in testimony that Minnick was unmarked when he got into the police patrol car for the three block ride to the station, but that when he was seen later at the station he was almost unrecognizable. Police said he required hospital treatment the accused patrolmen said they were forced to battle with Minnick because he tried to grab Patrolman Leddon's gun. One of the policemen was injured in the struggle. The court was told Magistrate Howard L. Aaron fined Minnick $25 for disorderly Conduct, suspended the fine and jailed him for 30 days on charges of assaulting the two policemen. This report was made Aug 9, 1955 (The Son)

1946 – In 1946 the paper reports Capt. William J. Forrest has been promoted to Inspector and has two police Lieutenants have been promoted to Captain. (10 Jan 1946) It went on to say, Inspector Forest will be placed in the command of the Southern and Central Districts. Lt Alfred Cormack has been named to succeed Inspector Forrest as captain in the Northwestern District, and Lieut. Thomas S. Dunn, of the Northeastern District, will assume command of the Southwestern District to fill the vacancy created by the recent retirement of Capt. Lawrence King. With filling of the fifth inspector's position, created by the last Legislature, Commissioner Atkinson announced that the city's eight districts will now be divided between four ·or the inspectors. Inspector Joseph H. Itzel will Command the Eastern and Northeastern districts, Inspector John H. Mintiens will head the Northwestern and Northern districts and Inspector John R. Schueler will be placed in charge of the Western and Southwestern districts. M. Joseph Wallace is chief inspector. (The Son)

1930 In Early December 1930 He was listed as a Lieutenant in the arrests of two robbery suspects accused of robbing a luncheon owner of $11 dollars at gun point. It took the good Lieutenant’s men a total of 15 minutes to capture these two desperados. The victim in this case was a, John Furman proprietor who runs a lunch room in the 1100 Block of Haubert Street. The incident took place at around 10 o’clock am when two armed men came in, one pointed a gun at him and demanded his daily take. Furman, handed them all he had approximately $11 dollars (his startup money, as this is a luncheon and the Robbers came in well before lunch time, they only got startup money for the day). The men were captured and arrested by Southern District Patrolmen John Peters and Martin Contey. Once at the Station the men identified themselves as Earnest Frost, 24, and Delmar Bull 22, both were sailors (this was an issue with Baltimore as far back as its founding days as a Port City, whereas criminals would come in on ships, commit crimes then either get back on the boat to leave the city, or a criminal transient simply move about the city without a trace) In this case, the police found $11 on one, and a pistol on the other. – The second incident titled Robbed at Gun Point, tells of Max Feldman, the owner of a Deli in the 4700 Block of Gwynn Oaks Ave, reported to the police that two men robbed him of $20 at gun point the night before. Feildman said one of the men about 25 entered the shop and asked for a sandwich, a second man drew a pistol and told him to get into the rear room. The two then took the $20 from the cash drawer. William T Sherwood night manager of the Guilford garage, Calvert and 34th Street reported that a man tried to steal an automobile from his garage at around 10:30 last night, as Sherwood attempted to stop him, he drew a pistol. Sherwood wisely backed off and let him go (without the automobile) In his same report City Police were on the lookout for three escaped suspects out of the Frederick City Jail, the three had sawed their way out, they said, one of those arrested had a diamond filling in his tooth, that was somehow used to saw through the bars to freedom, (I guess you could say they chewed their way out) And now we hear more about our Famed Lieutenant Williams, as Mr. Friedman saves $300 by picking it from the floor of the Callow Ave Streetcar on which the robbery occurred. One of the thieves had dropped the loot on the floor while taking the entire amount from the grocer’s pocket. The Robbery was accomplished by jostling Mr. Freidman so that he did not feel a hand slip into the inside pocket of his suit coat. So violent was the jostling Mr. Friedman was about to tell the two men, one in front of him the other behind to leave him alone when he noticed the money on the floor of the car. He noticed too that his pocket was empty and his Bank book was gone. The Struggle followed the theft, Me Friedman grabbed for the nearest thief, the second thief joined in the fray and the three men left the streetcar at Liberty and Redwood Streets. They fell to the street and two $50 bills from the $300 Mr. Friedman had salvaged fluttered to the ground. Mr. Freidman stopped to pick up the money and the two thieves ran, one east on Redwood street and the other west on the same thoroughfare. Cased by Patrolman, A cab driver, Anthony Aquilla, 18 was sitting in his parked machine near the car stop when three men left the trolley. He called a patrolman Mr. Friedman and the Patrolman got into a cab and followed the pickpockets east on Redwood, losing him in a crowd at Charles Street. Then Mr. Friedman, who lives at 1233 South Cary Street, went to the Western District where he told his story to Capt. John S Cooney and Lieutenant William J Forrest. So from this we not only get a little history of the times, by we see in in 1930 Inspector Williams was a Lieutenant (The Son)

1922 – Monshine raid made late September 1922 Southern district police, headed by Lieutenant William J. Forrest and Sergeant Clarence C. Kendall, yesterday 20 September 1922 raided 415 South Hanover Street, where they charge, they discovered a 200-gallon still, a 100-horspower boiler, 18 50· gallon fermenters, 500 pounds of rye meal and eight gallons of moonshine liquor. They arrested Albert Leuba and Arthur Chicks, both of 125 West Barre street, who were turned over to Edward J Lindholm, deputy internal revenue collector, who seized the illicit outfit. Leuba and Chicks were arraigned before J Frank Supplee Jr, United States Commissioner, and held for a hearing September 29th  Sumuel .J. Hall and Chester E. Nolas, of Rising Sun Md., were released on bail for court after a hearing before the Commissioner on charges of manufacturing and possessing liquor. The charges developed from the discovery of a 200-gallon still at Rising Sun. Palmer C. Rakes, also arrested. was held on an additional charge of resisting and obstructing an officer. A continuance was ordered in the case against Norman A. Clark, whose address was given as 543 Wayne street, accused of being the principal in distilling operations at Earleigh Heights, Anne Arundel county, where a 1,000 gallon still was found. M Carenda and William Woods are implicated under the warrant of arrest. David King, negro, arrested at the time, turned Government witness. Joseph Feriara. Russell Torres and Herman Constantine, of Baltimore, and Delmar Sutphin and Edward Wilkins, of Hising Sun, charged with manufacturing and possessing liquor, were released on bail for court. (The Son)

1907 History of the Baltimore Police Department 1774-1907 Original book released in 1907, Lists William J Forrest on Page 56 with a photo, as a Sergeant, at the time in order to meet eligibility requirements as a Sergeant, one had to have at least 3 years in Patrol, and while we have him in a 1907 Book which would make him a member since at least 1904, we have other news articles putting him in the news in 1904, also listed as Sergeant, meaning we are looking at 1898/99 – But then, there is a final article in which they were considering him for promotion to the rank of Sergeant and that was 12 May 1897. So assuming it was his first chance for promotion, and he came on 3 years earlier 1894… and he retired in 1956 it would mean he did 62 years on force, now assuming he came on at 21 years of age, he would have been 83 at retirement not 80 as was believed. We already know the newspaper was incorrect as to the 1911 date they gave him as a start date, their own articles show he was on in 1897, 1904, 1907, 1922, 1930, 1946, 1955, and 1956. The main question now is, was the 3 year rule in affect, and is so did he start in 1894 or 95. (The father)

1904 – 28 Oct 1904 (the year of the Great Fire) the Baltimore Sun article Titled “Policemen Transferred” subtitled Sergeant Carberry Sent to Northwestern Distirct’ It began by saying, “The Following changes were made yesterday 27 October 1904, by the Board of Police Commissioners: Sergt. William J. Forrest Northwestern to Central... it names an additional 7 Sergeants or patrolmen that were moved around before continuing… The Changes were made “for the good of the Department” and ere brought about after the hearing of the case of Sergt. Carberry, who was before the board shortly before the changes were made? The three patrolman removed from the Central District were in Sergeant Carberry’s squad and testified against him at a hearing. It was decide at the hearing that there was much feeling among the men and that it would be best to scatter them apart. Patrolmen William L Thomas, who testified against the sergeant, was allowed to remain in his district. Probationary Patrolman George J. Will, of the Western district, was made a regular patrolman and Alexander H. Hobbs was made a probationer and assigned to the Central District by Orders of the board, Detective Todd Hall was given $25 donated by Mr. Allen Mclane in investigating the death of Mayor McLane. For services rendered by the detective in investigating the death of Mayor McLane. Detective Hall reported that the death of the Mayor was accidental. (The father)

1904 – 30 May 1904 Two raids were made In the Northwestern district Yesterday why officers in plain clothes under the direction of Capt. Schultz. Shortly after 1 o'clock in the morning Round Sergeant Thomas Hood, Sergeant William J. Forrest and Patrolmen James E. Abbott and Harry Webster entered the saloon of George L Jeannert, 589 Baker street, and surprised the 19 occupants all colored. All bands were sent to the station in the patrol wagon, it being necessary to make two trips. Justice Goldman committed Jeannert for court on the charge of selling liquor on Sunday. The saloon of Mrs Kate Keaveney, at 540 Dolphin street, was raided about noon by Patrolmen Robert T. Neal, Albert McLane and Peter Coughlin, of the Northern district. When the officers entered the place they found five negroes standing before the bar and there was a rush tor liberty. One dashed through the house and made his escape by leaping over the rear fence. The other four were taken to the station, with several glasses of beer. Mrs. Keaveney was released on bail tor court by Justice Goldman on the charge of selling liquor on Sunday. (The father)

1897 – 12 May 1897 - Patrolman Plum's Promotion. The list or patrolman’s names considered as eligible by Captain Baker and prepared the day previous was produced. It contained the names of Plum, Miller, Forrest, Bishop, and Green. Commissioner Johnson named Plum. (The father)

captain william forrest
Captain William J Forrest Son
later promoted to Inspector

inspector william forrest badge1
Original Inspector badge and case belonging to Inspector William J Forrest

inspector william forrest badge2The original badge issued to Inspector William J Forrest
pistol6

While we can see this isn't the same holster, or for the same make model gun, we can see it is made by the same leather smith, we can see that portion where the two straps come together and look like a seven almost, and that it is unique to both holsters - We can also see from information in the photo that this was custom made for a Smith & Wesson "Baby Russian"  a .38 Cal. Revolver often carried by our Police back in the late 1800's early 1900's - we should also note, that during these time a lot of officers carried their pistols in their pocket, hence the need of a pocket holster. We have had several serious injuries, even some deaths caused by this seriously unsafe method of carrying a weapon.

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The following are Holsters one time owned by Inspector Forrest

The following two Holsters were purchased from a seller of antique firearms, leather and other police related Antiquities. This seller was selling these for Charles "Charlie" Klein, Charlie is 84 years old as of the time of this post (April 2014) he said he got these from his Uncle William Forest, a one time Inspector.   

 57iPocket Holster from the Late 1800's early 1900's
 57iiPocket Holster from the Late 1800's early 1900's
 59Pocket Holster from the Late 1800's early 1900's
 57iuyAudley Saftey Holster Pat. 13 Oct. 1914
 57audyAudley Saftey Holster Pat. 13 Oct. 1914

765Audley Saftey Holster Pat. 13 Oct. 1914
 57 17On the right we see the rear of the Audley Safety Holster Pat. 13 Oct. 1914
 58
On the right we see the rear of the Audley Safety Holster Pat. 13 Oct. 1914

The Audley Safety Holster Company was established in the early 1900s, prior to 1905, by F. H. Audley who had previously been a Saddle, Harness and Boot maker. These were trades he had learned early in life as a young boy and developed over 30 in the Saddlery and Harness business.

Having started his own saddlery business in New York, at 2557 Third Avenue (Near 139th Street), in approximately 1876 and operating until 1885, F. H. Audley closed his business and went into business with Mr. P. H. Comerford remaining in Saddlery, Harness & Boot making. In 1891, Frank H. Audley went back into business himself and although making quality saddlery and boots, he struggled over the next 10 years until the turn of the century.

In the early 1900s, F. H. Audley moved his shop to 8 Centre Market Place, across from Police Headquarters and it was at this time he starting getting a lot of exposure to Police equipment. From this time, F. H. Audley filed many patents for various pieces of Police equipment which he developed and sold to many of the New York City Police Officers that utilized he services from his accessible location.

The most famous of these inventions was the Audley Safety Holster which F. H. Audley applied for patents in 1912 and they were approved October 13, 1914. The holster incorporates a spring loaded steel catch in the body of the holster which securely holds the pistol in place. It can only be released by using the index finger to depress the catch. It is virtually impossible for anyone other than the person wearing the holster to do this. No other retaining strap is required.

They were popular with many officers in WW1 and were also used by many American Police Departments. The Audley Company was taken over by the Folsom Arms Co., which in turn was absorbed by the Cortland Bootjack Co, and eventually became the JayPee holster company. This particular model was probably used by a motor cycle or horse mounted officer of the 1920-30 period.

Francis H. Audley Died in May of 1916 and by chance, I was able to find a copy of the Obituary from the New York Times May 11, 1916

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Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222 - 

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll

Baltimore City Park Police

Saturday, 08 February 2020 04:31 Written by

Baltimore City Park Police
BCPP

Baltimore Park Police Badge
Courtesy Patricia Driscoll

City Police Power to Include Parks

10 March 1961 – page 29

City Police Power to Include Parks

ANNAPOLIS nine marks – the Senate today enacted a Bill extending the authority of Baltimore city police put into the counties said they may police parkland.

Introduced by delicate Marvin Mandel Democrat this Baltimore the measure provides that the authority of the city’s police Commissioner Shelby concurred with local police.

Recently, the city force absorbed the Park police and the bill extends its authority into the parks. Meanwhile, Senate President George W Della Democrat six Baltimore introduced the Bill protecting the pension and promotion rights gained by members of the Park police before the merger.

THE PARK ASSAULT CASE

Reported for the Baltimore Sun

The Sun (1837-1987); May 27, 1887;

pg. 5

THE PARK ASSAULT CASE

confession of the prisoner and establishment of his identity

the color man who had said his name was Thomas Henry, and is accused of a felonious assault on Mrs. Mary J. Ridley, of West Woodbury, and George Hill Park, Tuesday morning, confessed to Marshal Jacob fray yesterday afternoon 26 may 1887 at police headquarters in Baltimore city in the presence of deputy Marshal Lannan Capt. Freeburger and detective Pumphrey that he assaulted the lady claiming however, to attacked her only for money, having seen a person or hand.

Marshall Fray was much interested in the case is eight of his policeman are detailed for duty in the park. After visiting the scene of the assault on Tuesday and conferring with Capt. could sell, he determined to his utmost to get to the bottom of the facts. Accordingly, he sent detective Pumphrey to Towsontown on Wednesday to have a talk with a colored mAn who was held in the jail there, and if possible gain from him any details that might be of use in ferreting out the prisoner’s history and movements. The detective did not have much luck so the Marshal resolved to try his hand. In company with Detective Pumphrey he drove to Towsontown yesterday morning and had a conference with states attorney Burke. The Marshal told Mr. Burke that he was very anxious to learn for himself if the colored man was the assailant of the lady, but felt he was somewhat handicapped by the remote distance between himself and the prisoner. The Marshal thought if he had the man in the city he would be able to learn something important. States attorney Burke said in reply that he was willing the Marshal should take Williams to Baltimore, and accordingly issued orders to that effect to the jail officials. Detective Pumphrey came to the city on the railway cars, while the colored man and the Marshal road together in the Marshal’s carriage. On the way, the Marshal replied his companion with questions, and on York road, beyond Waverley, Williams, feeling himself cornered, said he was sick and would not talk further. The Marshal did not press him. When police headquarters were reached Williams was given a seat in the Marshal’s office, were deputy Marshal Lannan and Capt. Freeburger were also. The Marshal said he had information that Williams was a thief and ordered at once an inspection of the rogue’s gallery, where a photograph of the colored man, numbered 1105, was found. On the back was the Miranda; “George H. Williams, arrested February 20, 1877, by policeman Dietz, central district, for larceny.” On March 2, of the same year, Williams was sent to the penitentiary for four years. He had been there before and was only free a short time after serving a sentence when apprehended by policeman Dietz. The Marshal sold Williams his own photograph, whereupon he again said he was sick. Then the Marshal told him of a statement the police had regarding the assault, to which Williams listened attentively, and on its conclusion said many of the details were incorrect. He eagerly told his side of the story and was taken to a private room, where in the presence of witnesses, he made his statement, admitting the assault for robbery, but claimed no other criminal intent. His statement which was recorded by the Marshal, was subsequently as follows: “my name is George Williams, Esther saw her sitting under a tree. She had the pocketbook in her hand, I passed her and turned, I snatched the pocketbook, and she threw her hands up. I struck her in the face; the pocketbook then fell to the ground. I picked up two silver dollars and one silver quarter. I then left her, and started to go out of the park, and was arrested by police before I left the park.”

By Marshall fray – “did she offer any resistance?” Williams – “no – serve.” Marshall Fray – “how do you account for the bruises on her face?” Answer – “I did not strike her. As I snatched the pocketbook out of her hand she held her hand up and my hand slipped and struck her on the face.” Marshall Fray – “did you not intend to strike or?” Williams – “no Sir” Williams is 29 years old. He is 5 feet 6 ½ inches tall and weighs 160 pounds. His skin is very dark. There is a large scar on his left cheek beside his ear.

Mrs. Mary J. Friendly, of West Woodbury, the victim of the assault, was reported Lee in proving by her physician Dr. Daniel W. Smith. Justice Harry T. The alley had fixed on Monday next for a hearing. On Wednesday night a party of men from Woodbury went to Towsontown with the determination to take the prisoner from jail and swing them up on the nearest tree, but owing to the failure of promised aid from an organize forced to appear from Woodbury to support the party decided to wait until all doubt was removed as to the identification of the prisoner is Miss Ripley’s assailant. The feeling and Woodbury is intense, and the general impression there is that if the prisoner is identified thoroughly at the hearing at justice dailies he will never reach Towsontown. Miss Ridley’s expresses herself positively that the prisoner is the right man.

The presence of men from Woodbury in Towsontown on Wednesday night was probably known to the County authorities they are and was one of the considerations influencing Mr. Burke to give the man up to Marshall Fray so as to have him in the safe hands of the Baltimore police the prisoner was kept in a cell at the central police station last night, and today will be sent to the Baltimore city jail to await the action of the County authorities.

Capt. to sell, detectives Freeburger and Pumphrey and County policeman Chase O’Neill, Chase Bowersox and William Kennedy and some city officers spent a good portion of yesterday afternoon at the place in Druid Hill Park where the assault took place, hunting for Mrs. Wrigley’s pocketbook, which was thrown away by her assailant.

baltparkpolice

c patrolman john harris

Patrolman John Harris

3 July, 1925 - Patrolman JOHN E. HARRIS - him patrolman John E Harris of Druid Hill Park police died yesterday in West Baltimore General Hospital from pneumonia which is said to have been caused by injuries received at last Monday when he was struck by an automobile operated by a student driver he was 73 years old. -At the hour of Mr. Harris’s death William Norris president of the Park board and conference with officers and members of the automobile trade Association refused to resend the boards order by which persons learning to drive automobiles would be prohibited from using roads in the public park the order was issued by Mr. Norris as a result of the accident in which officer Harris was hurt. The conference ended with the Association deciding to abide by the ruling of the board. Student driver held Harry Siegel 2366 McCulloch Street who under the tutelage of alley apple sign 6 North Bond St. was operating the machine which is said to have struck the patrolman, was released in the custody of his attorney at the Northwestern police station pending the action of Dr. J Terrell Hennessey corner Siegel was charged with causing officer Harris’s death. He had been released after the accident in the custody of his attorney. The police said Apple stain also may be arrested, but no immediate action against him has been taken. (*10) 

PATROLMAN, STRUCK BY CAR IN PARK, DIES

The Sun (1837-1987); Jul 4, 1925;

pg. 3

Patrolman struck by a car in park, DIES

student motorist held in death of John E Harris

Ban Will Not Be should be heart upon a guitar player Lifted

North after conference Declares roads will remain closed to learners

Patrolman John E. Harris, of Juneau Park police, died yesterday at the West Baltimore General Hospital from pneumonia, which is said to have been caused by injuries received last Monday when he was struck by an automobile operated by a student driver. He was 73 years old

at the hour of Mr. Harris’s death William L. Norris, president of the park board and conference with officers and members of the automobile trade Association refused to resend the boards order by which persons learning to drive automobiles would be prohibited from using roads in the public parks. The order was issued by Mr. Norris as a result of the accident in which Mr. Harris was hurt. The conference ended with the Association deciding to abide by the ruling of the board.

Student Driver Held

Harry Siegel, 2366 McCulloch Street, who under the tutelage of Eli Apple Stein, 6 North Bond St., was operating the machine which is said to have struck the patrolman, was released in the custody of his attorney at the Northwestern police station pending the action of Dr. J. Tyrell Hensley coroner. Siegel was charged with causing Mr. Harris’s death. He had been released after the accident in the custody of his attorney. The police said Apple stain who may be arrested, but no immediate action against him was contemplated.

Conference Called Helpful

Mr. Nora said his conference with the officers and members of the automobile trade Association had been “very helpful.” He asserted the automobile salesman were of the opinion that the practice of teaching novices how to drive in the parks was dangerous to pedestrians. An officer of the Association and Mr. Nora’s will tout roads adjacent to Baltimore next week in an effort to locate territory available for beginners.

The salesman contended Mr. Nora said, that the roads of Druid Hill Park had been used by student drivers because of their proximity to the automobile trade centers of the city.

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Park Police mountedpark police mounted 1942

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POWER IS GIVEN TO PARK POLICE

The Sun (1837-1987); Aug 1, 1956;

pg. 8

Power is given to Park police McKeldin grants them law enforcement authority

Governor McKeldin has signed special commissions for 21 Baltimore Park police members granting them law – enforcement authority in three areas in Baltimore and Anne Arundel County’s.

The properties involved are Fort Smallwood Park, and Anne Arundel County and Robert E Lee Park at Lake real and grandma Memorial Park both in Baltimore County although Baltimore’s Park police currently have jurisdiction in the sections, their powers of arrest apparently have been of a “quasilegal” nature.

From City Charter

The Park police derived their authority from Baltimore city charter and are under the rule of the Park board.

Yesterday both Charles A book superintendent of the Bureau of Parks and Lieut. Millard F Livingston acting head of the police unit admitted that the authority of the Park police to operate outside Baltimore city has been periodically questioned.

Explaining his request to the governor which resulted in the authorizing commissions. Mr. Hook said “we’re just playing safe.”

Might have been “invalid”

The superintendent also admitted that if a defendant who had been arrested by Park police in one of these areas had challenged the arresting authority of the officers the courts might have ruled the arrest invalid.

The new authority from governor McKeldin appointing the 21 officers as “special policeman for the state of Maryland” in three recreational zones should end any such controversy. Mr. Hook said

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Balti Park police K9
The Park Police

The Sun (1837-1987); May 15, 1956;

pg. 14

The Park Police

when the Baltimore Park police make news as they are currently doing, it comes as a surprise to most people to learn that they are not a branch of the city Police Department, but an autonomous body, owing allegiance to the Park board and the Mayor, and not the police Commissioner. In practice, they work very closely with the regular police, use the police radio service, request help from the police Commissioner for special assignments and divide with the police department with jurisdictions over the islands of park property here and there in the city.

Technically, they control the policing of the stripes of grass in Eutaw place, the railings around the battle monument in the fountains in Mount Vernon Pl. In practice they patrol Mount Vernon Pl. only between midnight and 8 AM the city police on the other hand, do not enter the parks unless they are in hot pursuit or are invited to do so by the Park police on such occasions as a big game at the stadium or when there are very large holiday crowds in the parks.

The city budget allows for 118 officers and men on the park force. Whose Capt., as head of a separate department, is paid a little more and other police captains. The rookie cops are paid less than the regular entrance to the police force: $3500 a year against 4000 for a third-grade city patrolman.

The origins of the force date back to the beginning of this century when the police commissioners declined to police the parks because he said his force was not sufficient, and a city law and powered the Park board to recruit its own law enforcement officers, who also acted as Park caretakers, a role that is now been separated from police duties.

From time to time, it has been suggested that the Park police should be united with the regular police force. An effort in 1949, made on the recommendations of the Mayor’s budget advisory committee, following a survey by the public administrators service, was tabled by the Park board. The survey recommended that a small Park police force merely for the protection of property should be retained, but that other functions of the Park police should be returned to the police department. This might be a useful moment for an Imperial review of the whole system of dual police control of the city, a system which on the face of it seems a little out of date.

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Balti Park police K9


GRAND JURY ACCUSES GAENG AND O'CONNOR IN PROBE OF PARK POLICE

The Sun (1837-1987); May 25, 1956;
pg. 52
GRAND JURY ACCUSES GAENG AND O’CONNOR IN PROBE OF PARK
POLICE

Conspiracy, malfeasance, and obstruction of justice laid to chief and Sgt. Savard also presented

Capt. G. Gordon Gaeng, chief of Baltimore Park police, and Sgt. Kenneth of the O’Connor yesterday were accused by the grand jury of conspiracy, malfeasance, and obstruction of justice.

The accusations against the two officers of the park force resulted from a probe into the matter in which Capt. Gaeng and Sgt. O’Connor investigated a woman’s complaint that she was molested by a park patrolman.

The grand jury also returned an accusing him of assaulting Mrs. Anna Mae Nichols, Negro, mother of two children, last August 29 and Gwen falls Park.

Officials of the park presentment against patrolman George A Savard, accusing him of assaulting Miss Anna Mae Nichols, Negro, mother of two children, last August 29 and Gwen falls Park.

Officials of the city’s Park board announced late yesterday that Lieut. Millard Livingston would be in command of the park police force pending the outcome of criminal charges

Released On Bail

Both Capt. Gaeng and Sgt. O’Connor were released on $1000 bail each late yesterday. The bond was posted by Maurice Berman, professional bondsman, with a Scherr, deputy clerk of the criminal court.

Charles A. Hook, superintendent of Parks announced later that both police officers will be suspended from duty as soon as he is formally notified of the charges.

Soured, already under suspension, is at liberty in $500 bail, posted last week in Northwestern police court after a warrant charging him with assault was obtained by Mrs. Nichols

Anselm Sodaro states attorney, who had assisted the grand jury in the probe along with Jay Robert Brown. Announced that he has ordered a dismissal of the police court charge against soured, in view of the grand jury’s action.

Held a Lineup

Seven weeks after Ms. Nichols lodged her complaint with the Park police last August, Capt. Gaeng conducted a lineup from which the number one suspect was excluded, it was revealed last week. The captain explained his failure to place the suspected policeman in the phony line up by saying that he believed Miss Nichols may have been trying to “finger” one of his men.

Ms. Nichols viewed a second line up in Baltimore police headquarters last week and Savard it was charged a few hours later.

Sgt. O’Connor’s and Savard are said to be related to each other.

The three present mints against of the two police officers contain for specific allegations of failure to perform their duty.

They are:

1 failing and neglecting to promptly charge severed with making an assault upon Ms. Nichols and conduct of police lineup of persons suspected of the assault

2 failing and neglecting to play severed in the line-up although he was the principal suspect at the time.

3 failing and neglecting to report to and appoint the Baltimore city Police Department with the facts that “a crime had been committed” by Savard and

4 failing to properly conduct and complete investigation of the charges against the Savard

Conspiracy Charge

the three resentments accused the captain and Sgt. of conspiracy together preventing charges of assault against Savard by means of the four allocated acts of omission, of attempting to obstruct justice in that manner and a willfully neglecting to perform their duty by the same for means.

Mr. Spadaro said indictments will be prepared promptly, and the cases will be set for arraignment in criminal court.

The pigeonholed complaint of Mrs. Nichols came to light recently when two patrolmen of the park force Baird the inaction of their superiors.

Mr.’s narrow promptly took up the inquiry, question more than 20 witnesses and finally laid the entire matter before the grand jury.

During his probe, the state attorney blocked any attempts by Capt. Gaines to conduct a second line-up of his own Park headquarters of the department

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MAYOR TAKES NO STAND ON POLICE PLAN

The Sun (1837-1987); Aug 15, 1958;

pg. 40

Mayor takes no stand on police plan

Declined to come out for or against city of merger idea

Mayor D’Alesandro refuse yesterday to take an outright stand for or against a merger of the Park police with the Baltimore city Police Department.

The mayor would say only that “the Baltimore city charter vest all power concerning the Park police in the Park board”

during the most recent previous controversy over a possible merger of the two forces the Park Board opposed such a move.

Leon Abramson, president of the city Council, said that at least for the present, he opposed any merger

Stands by report

the “assistant mayor” said he still stood by a 1957 report of the councils the judiciary committee which did not approve a resolution requesting a study of a need for merger.

The latest calls for elimination of the Park police as a separate force followed the murder of a 57-year-old woman whose body was found on the Clifton Park golf course early August 5

governor McKeldin, on returning from abroad earlier this week, said he favored a merger. But that his opinion was not based on the Clifton Park crime.

Matter of jurisdiction

the difference in attitude between the city and state officials underlines the fact that the merger argument is partly a matter of city versus state jurisdiction.

The Baltimore Police Department is under administrative control of the state. It’s Commissioner is appointed by the governor.

But the Park police is not connected with the Police Department, although the two forces cooperate closely. The Park police owes its allegiance to the Park board and the mayor, not to the police Commissioner. Mr. Abramson said a merger “is not as easy as it sounds. It requires action by the legislator as well as charter amendments”

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ENDING OF PARK POLICE SOUGHT
The Sun (1837-1987); Jun 28, 1959;

pg. 40

Ending of Park Police Sought

Rubenstein would merge city departments

City Councilman Leon Rubenstein Democrat fifth district will sponsor a resolution tomorrow urging absorption of the Park police by Baltimore’s regular Police Department.

Although the Council is scheduled to recess for the summer after tomorrow’s meeting Mr. Rubenstein is hoping his measure can be the subject of hearings during the summer months.

Sure of Recommendation

He will ask that it be referred to the parks and recreation committee and that the committee consider the measurement carefully before the Council returns in the fall.

Although Mr. Rubenstein favors ending the separate Park police force, his resolution asked the mayor to appoint a commission to study the practicality of MERGER and Park police into the regular Police Department.

The Council and said he convinced that any independent commission will recommend such a step after studying the situation.

He recommends prompt action, declaring it favorable commission report would then necessitate the legislative action to enlarge the Police Department and also a special referendum in 1960 would be required to amended the city charter.

Transfer in Grade

Mr. Rubenstein would transfer all present Park police to regular force with no loss in grade, rank, seniority and pension rights.

According to Mr. Rubenstein the city’s Park commission was first granted the right to preserve peace in parklands by the city charter of 1862 the purpose of the power was to police of the new Druid Hill Park, which at the time was wholly beyond the city limits and thus beyond the authority of city police he said.

Says Reason is Gone

the city not only absorbed Druid Hill Park but grew to have many other parks – all the while continuing the system of separate Park police force, the councilman said in a prepared statement.

He contends the reason for the separate Park police force no longer exists.

Mr. Rubenstein arguing for an end to the separate Park force, says:

1. A single police system will be more efficient

2. Economies will be possible

3. “Duplicity of command” will be avoided.

4. Better distribution of policing throughout the city will be possible.

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Tawes Approves Merger Of Park Police, City Force
The Sun (1837-1987); Mar 31, 1960;

pg. 36

Tawes Approves Merger Of Park Police, City Force

Governor Tawes has “given his blessing” to the proposed merger of the Park police with the Baltimore police force, city officials said yesterday.

Dr. Frank C Marino, president of the Park board, reports that development after he and other officials conferred with the governor at his Baltimore office.

The governor has agreed to take administrative steps that city legal aids have said are necessary in order to bring about the merger. Dr. Marino said

Hepbron at Meeting

he reported that James M Hepbron, police Commissioner who was also present at the meeting, has agreed to assign one of his inspectors to survey the Park police force and arrange for its integration into the city’s police department.

The inspector will spend part of his time with the Park police to determine which duties each man is best suited for and to discover which members need further training.

Dr. Marino said Governor Tawes is “with us 100%” on the city plan to merge the two police forces by January 1.

Agreement by the governor is necessary for several reasons, according to an opinion by Harrison L. Winter. City solicitor.

Police Strength Up

since the city police, which operates under the jurisdiction of the state government, are very near their us authorized strength, the written consent of both Governor Tawes and Mayor Grady must be obtained to bring the park officers in.

Mr. winter also discovered that the Park police derive their authority in Park property outside the city through special commissions given them by the governor. Similar commissions would have to be given to some city policeman so they could patrol those parks.

City officials will confer shortly with officials of Baltimore and Anne Arundel County’s to obtain their consent to use the city police to patrol city parks in their territories. Dr. Marino added.

He repeated his determination to merge the 126 man Park police force, which has been an arm of the Park board, with the city department by January 1. That date was selected because it is the beginning of the next city fiscal year

in Outlining the administrative steps that he said could accomplish the merger, Mr. Winter recommended that the city seek legislation in the Gen. assembly next year confirming the actions taken.

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31E16 001f

January 1 Is Ruled O.K. As Date Of Police Merger
JAMES S KEAT

The Sun (1837-1987); Mar 3, 1960;
pg. 36

January 1 Is Ruled O.K. As Date Of Police Merger

Merger of Park police into the Baltimore Police Department can be accomplished next January 1, the city solicitor ruled yesterday.

Dispelled widely held assumptions that the merger might take a year or two, the city chief law officers said no state or city legislation must be passed before affecting it.

Harrison L Winter city solicitor, and Morton Al Goldner, assistant, recommended the January 1 date primarily because it is the beginning of the next city fiscal year.

Legislation Do

Several items of legislation, including an amendment to the city charter, are proposed to be made later. But the law officers said the merger could go ahead before passage of the legislation.

Merger of Park police into city force has been talked about for many years. The proposal gathered new force last fall when Mayor Grady and Dr. Frank C Marino president of the Park board, endorsed it.

After reading the decision, Dr. Marino seconded the recommendations.

Park Board Has Voted

“For the best interest of the city and the men of two departments, the quicker it’s done the better.” He said, “I would like to have it all done by the first of the year.”

The Park board has already voted in favor of the merger. James M Hepbron, police Commissioner, said last fall that he favored the move, after seeming reluctant about it when it was previously proposed to several years ago.

A resolution calling for a commission to study legislation necessary for the merger and a proposed charter amendment to accomplish it have been pending in the city Council since last fall.

Mr. Winter and his associates have been studying this since the law relating to the Park police. A force independent of the city department and responsible only to the Park board.

Their recommendations were forwarded yesterday to Dr. Marino.

Several important administrative steps will have to be taken before January 1 to accomplish the merger, Mr. Winter reported.

They include obtaining a written consent of the Mayor and of governor Tawes to the inclusion of Park policeman in the city department pending action by the state legislature increasing the city forces authorized strength.

Since it appears that Park policeman exercise their authority and parks outside the city limits by means of special commissions from the governor, Mr. Winter said, similar authority should be obtained for some city policeman.

He said an amendment to the charter should be submitted immediately to the Council for passage in time for ratification in the general election next November simply as a matter of “good legal housekeeping.”

Suggestion Made

legislation should be prepared for submission to the Gen. assembly next year, confirming the transfer of Park policeman to the city department and granting the police Commissioner concurrent authority over city parks in the counties. Mr. winter said.

“In this connection, it would seem to us to be highly desirable to consult with the legislative representatives of neighboring subdivisions in which Park property is located to reach an agreement” in advance on an acceptable amendment to the state law limiting the city departments authority to Baltimore’s borders, he added.

Taking the legal problems one by one, Mr. winter found that none of the necessarily an obstacle to swift action on the merger.

“Concurrent Jurisdiction”

although the charter “might at first blush same” to give soul policing authority in the parks to the Park board, he said the Police Department is granted “concurrent jurisdiction” over parkland within the city.

He said a court of appeals the ruling in 1902 and administrative practice at least since 1947 “has been for the city police to exercise authority within the parks their respective of a request from your department to do so.”

An amendment to the charter confirming the charge would be “desirable from the standpoint of good legal housekeeping.” Mr. winter said. But is “unnecessary as a condition proceeded to affecting the contemplated merger.”

The authorized strength of the Police Department is fixed by Gen. assembly, Mr. winter continued. But the state law also provides that the police Commissioner can exceed that number with the written approval of the governor and mayor he said.

Since some city parkland, like Fort Smallwood, is located outside its borders, the city police will need authority to take over the duties of Park policeman in those areas.

“The Basic Question”

“The basic question of the authority of Park police to act as conservatories of the peace has never been conclusively resolved, and our and quarries have this closed that Park police act as conservatories of the peace in park areas outside the city by virtue of commissions issued by the governor as special police, rather than by virtue of their being Park police.” Mr. Winter said

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City Stays On Fringe Of Big News In 1960
CHARLES V FLOWERS

The Sun (1837-1987); Jan 1, 1961;
pg. 14 City Stays On Fringe Of Big News In 1960

Though generally on the tinges of big news, except in sports, Baltimore made the national impact in 1960 by beating the biggest bunch of people in Texas.

Preliminarily senses figures showed that Houston Edges Baltimore as the country’s six largest city. Hordes of the uncounted became accounted for later in the year though and Baltimore maintained its position by a margin of 805 people 939,024 people to Houston’s 938,219

Something to ponder Texans being the way they are used it is something to think about for 1970

But back to the fringes; it is a sad obligation to report in 8 years and story that in a surprising to defeat the regal Colts were shoved to the outskirts of the professional football court

Young Orioles provided some consolation, rising Phoenix like from sixth place in the American League in 1959 to 2nd place in 1960 a walloping outfielder could mean the pennant this year baseball buffs believe crime in Baltimore rocketed along about as always – quite a bit of it, but nothing spectacular. The 111 murders surpassed the totals of the previous four years, but police made arrests and all but two of the killings.

A federal grand jury indicted Melvin D. Reese Junior, 31 of Hyattsville a musician in the kidnapping murder of Mrs. Carol the Jackson Junior 27 and her five-year-old daughter Susan and in shallow grave the Jackson’s, of Apple Grove Virginia were found in March 1959 in a shallow grave in the Gambrill section of Anne Arundel County federal agents arrested Reese a West Memphis, arc, in June and brought him here for indictment. Virginia officials also charge Reese with murdering Mr. Jackson 29 and other Jackson daughter Janet 18 months.

In addition Anne Arundel officials charge Reese with the 1957 murder of Mrs. Margaret Harold she was killed in the Gambrill section while parked with a soldier.

Reese had not come to trial because of pretrial motions.

In a not quite murder, it Puerto Rican tavern operator who formerly danced on the block was not quite convicted.

Judge James K Cullen gave Miss Marino raise 30 probation before verdict on charges of attempting to commit murder, conspiring to commit murder and trying to hire an undercover detective to kill a disc jockey who had gone back to his wife.

The purported victim was Ray Davis, of Glen Burnie. But the loser was Mrs. Davis. She was fined $50 may six after finding her husband and threatening him with a pistol. She said he had not been home for days. Fraudulent claims for welfare payment constituted the longer continual court action of the year in Baltimore. More than 250 persons were indicted during the year. Payments on the fraudulent claims amounted to about $200,000.

Most of those convicted were women who maintained they were without support because their husband had deserted them, though it was proved that they were being supported by other men.

One such mother of nine was sentenced to four years imprisonment. Welfare officials noticed a decline in the number of other applicants.

Inmates of Marilyn penal institutions grew reckless in August and about 1600 of them went on strike.

Inside workers complained that they should have the same sentence reduction benefits the prisoners working outside were getting. A new Board of corrections ruled allowing prisoners working outside five days a month to deduct the five days from their sentence on August 8 see Fernando Sievert Atty. Gen. ruled that no prisoners could have the five-day deduction. The inmates dude and rattled their cell bars but ended the strike.

As has been the custom for three years previously, Blue Cross and Blue Shield rates went up in 1960 the Blue Cross increase effective October 1 average 17.9% the Blue Shield rates rose by as much as 33.4%.

Besides reestablishing Baltimore in sixth place among the nation cities, the 1960 census gave Marilyn another state in the house of representatives.

The new congressional district will be the eighth, and its representative will be elected in 1962 politician said last month that the A’s should be carved from the populous fifth, which covers southern Maryland.

All three of Baltimore’s Congressman – all Democrat – one again in the November 8 election.

Baltimore gave Sen. John F. Kennedy and 88,000 majority over vice Pres. Nixon for the presidency and the state also gave a majority to Kennedy.

The state electoral vote to establish an 11th judge municipal court in Baltimore, replacing the police and traffic court system. State voters also expanded the court of appeals by two judges. In the city, judges J Gilbert Pendergrass and Delaney Forster were returned to the supreme bench and judges Harry L Rogers and William T Tippit Junior to people’s court.

School Plans Okayed

Voters also approved a $22 million school construction bond issued to approve merging Park police with city police. They rejected several bond issues including one for $4 million for the expansion of the cramped Walters Art Gallery.

The city jail expanded, new wings costing $3 million were dedicated late in the fall.

Construction began on the $3 million mercy hospital at St. Paul Place and Lexington Street and workers completed the steel frame for the 20 story for under bed structure.

The Civic Center had trouble with its plans, but it also made firm progress. Workers began clearing the 5-acre site last February and finished long before the year ended.

Last spring the architect was asked to revise his design for the $12 million project to include a permanent stage suitable for Opera. He said he would have to eliminate the distinctive pleated roof for economy reasons. But later in the year, the Civic Center commission voted to restore the plates. While keeping the states.

Definite Progress

There was definite progress, also, on the adjoining Charles center, in March the urban renewal and housing commission chose Metropolitan structures Corporation of Chicago to put up the first building.

It will be a 23 story office building designed by Ludwig Miles Vander role, and will be at trolls and Lexington streets on the site of the old O’Neill’s department store. On August 4 the city brought the first property for clearance in the center, at 15 W. Lexington.

After some torturous detouring for most of the year motors finally were able in December to zip across the St. Paul Street bridge at the Pennsylvania Station the old bridge was closed last January, the new bridge costing $1.8 million was built to give greater CLARENCE over the Jones falls Expressway.

Construction on the expressway progress between the Pennsylvania Station area and Coldspring Lane causing the closing of two other bridges. The 29th St. and Cedar Avenue. The Cedar Avenue bridge closed in June and reopened in September: the 29th St. bridge closed in March and will not open until 1962

Resident Annoyed

One annoyed Baltimorean wrote to a newspaper: “with the closing of the Cedar Avenue bridge, Baltimoreans witnessed a second predawn coup which effectively sealed off Hampton and lower North Baltimore from the West approaches.”

Accompanied by a willing and noshing of teeth by nearby residents, contractors filled in Hamden reservoir for an interchange to the expressway.

Arguments continued over the route of the East – West Expressway. Someone it the “Chinese wall” pass near Chase Street others one of the expressways near the inner harbor.

A section of northern Parkway was opened. It runs westward from old Harford road through Mount Pleasant golf course to the Lynn Road. Construction on the Western and it began.

There were many changes during the year and business and financial circles.

Best on steel company announced plans in March to expand its Sparrows Point plant capacity by 10%. Already the world’s largest the plant will have an and get capacity of 9 million tons a year 18 tons a minute after the expansion, which will cost an estimated $179 million.

Last Martin Plane

The Martin company went out of the airplane business after 48 years, the longest continuous history of such manufacturing in the country. On December 20 the company completed its last plane and said it will concentrate on missiles. Electronics, nuclear energy and designs in space vehicles. The company moved to Baltimore from California 1929.

Having slipped behind Philadelphia in the amount of foreign tonnage passing through the port Baltimore regained that the number two position in the United States.

In November the Marilyn port authority said that for the first six months of 1960, Baltimore handled 11,546,000 long tons second only to New York’s 21,000,192 long tons. The authority expected Baltimore’s foreign trade to be about 7.3% higher for the year than in 1959.

Toward the end of the year the thriving Chesapeake and Ohio railway claimed 55% of the stock of the ounce pound Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. The Chelsea, smaller but sounder than the BNO, said it was extending its stock exchange offers to February 2 and expected to pick up 10% more.

Merger Lists

Fidelity – Baltimore national bank and Marilyn trust company merged into the Baltimore national bank. Maryland’s largest and among other mergers the Brunswick Corporation acquired the Ones yacht company.

It will not hurt until this year but last month the city Council imposed several new taxes to meet Baltimore’s $292,301,000 budget the budget is $38,666,000 higher than in 1960 the Council raise the tax on commercial users of gas and electric from 8 to 9% established a 3% residential phone use tax, and imposed a recordation Levy of a dollar 10 for each $500 valuation and an annual fee of $15 for dairy farm supplying the city. The property tax remained at $3.60 for each hundred dollar valuation.

The schools were plagued with one more problem than has been customary in recent years. In October William J Murray third dropped out of the ninth grade at Wilburn Junior high school. He said he was an atheist and objected to having to listen to Bible readings and the Lord’s prayer in opening exercises rulings made the state department of education ruled November 2 that Bible readings is constitutional but pupils who object may be excused. The city school board made a similar ruling in the month. By last month only six pupils had asked to be excused, though Miss Madeleine E Murray, mother of William, filed a suit in Superior Court asking for elimination of segregation opening exercises from public schools.

Jewish leaders asked in December that Hanukkah observances be eliminated from public schools.

Dr. George Beebe brain, who succeeded Dr. John H Fisher as a school superintendent last January, issued no formal orders on the Jewish request but left it up to school principals.

Except the hurricane Donna in September, whether has generally been unspectacular. The hurricane will Ocean City Maryland leaving a number of resort structures roofless. Being only on the fringes this time, was a good thing for Baltimore. Which was flooded in some sections by 5 inches of rain.

On December 11 and December 12 a total of 14.1 inches of snow fell to set a record for a 24 hour. Messy and stubborn remnants of the snowfall linger yet

For persons who are meant much to the city died during the year.

Robert R O’Connor 63 died March 4 he had been state's attorney for Baltimore for three terms, Atty. Gen., governor for two terms and United States Sen. for six years.

On August 31 Howard Jackson died. He had been mayor for four terms, longer than anyone else he was 83 years old.

Philip B Perlman 70 died July 31 he was a former solicitor Gen. of the United States. He had helped write the Democratic platform at the Los Angeles convention shortly before his death.

The most Rev. Jerome D Sebastian, auxiliary Bishop of Baltimore, died October 11 he was 64 years old. For years he had also been perished priest of St. Elizabeth church in East Baltimore

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MAYOR TAKES NO STAND ON POLICE PLAN

The Sun (1837-1987); Aug 15, 1958;

pg. 40

Mayor takes no stand on police plan

Declined to come out for or against city of merger idea

Mayor D’Alesandro refuse yesterday to take an outright stand for or against a merger of the Park police with the Baltimore city Police Department.

The mayor would say only that “the Baltimore city charter vest all power concerning the Park police in the Park board”

during the most recent previous controversy over a possible merger of the two forces the Park Board opposed such a move.

Leon Abramson, president of the city Council, said that at least for the present, he opposed any merger

Stands by report

the “assistant mayor” said he still stood by a 1957 report of the councils the judiciary committee which did not approve a resolution requesting a study of a need for merger.

The latest calls for elimination of the Park police as a separate force followed the murder of a 57-year-old woman whose body was found on the Clifton Park golf course early August 5

governor McKeldin, on returning from abroad earlier this week, said he favored a merger. But that his opinion was not based on the Clifton Park crime.

Matter of jurisdiction

the difference in attitude between the city and state officials underlines the fact that the merger argument is partly a matter of city versus state jurisdiction.

The Baltimore Police Department is under administrative control of the state. It’s Commissioner is appointed by the governor.

But the Park police is not connected with the Police Department, although the two forces cooperate closely. The Park police owes its allegiance to the Park board and the mayor, not to the police Commissioner. Mr. Abramson said a merger “is not as easy as it sounds. It requires action by the legislator as well as charter amendments”

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ENDING OF PARK POLICE SOUGHT
The Sun (1837-1987); Jun 28, 1959;

pg. 40

Ending of Park Police Sought

Rubenstein would merge city departments

City Councilman Leon Rubenstein Democrat fifth district will sponsor a resolution tomorrow urging absorption of the Park police by Baltimore’s regular Police Department.

Although the Council is scheduled to recess for the summer after tomorrow’s meeting Mr. Rubenstein is hoping his measure can be the subject of hearings during the summer months.

Sure of Recommendation

He will ask that it be referred to the parks and recreation committee and that the committee consider the measurement carefully before the Council returns in the fall.

Although Mr. Rubenstein favors ending the separate Park police force, his resolution asked the mayor to appoint a commission to study the practicality of MERGER and Park police into the regular Police Department.

The Council and said he convinced that any independent commission will recommend such a step after studying the situation.

He recommends prompt action, declaring it favorable commission report would then necessitate the legislative action to enlarge the Police Department and also a special referendum in 1960 would be required to amended the city charter.

Transfer in Grade

Mr. Rubenstein would transfer all present Park police to regular force with no loss in grade, rank, seniority and pension rights.

According to Mr. Rubenstein the city’s Park commission was first granted the right to preserve peace in parklands by the city charter of 1862 the purpose of the power was to police of the new Druid Hill Park, which at the time was wholly beyond the city limits and thus beyond the authority of city police he said.

Says Reason is Gone

the city not only absorbed Druid Hill Park but grew to have many other parks – all the while continuing the system of separate Park police force, the councilman said in a prepared statement.

He contends the reason for the separate Park police force no longer exists.

Mr. Rubenstein arguing for an end to the separate Park force, says:

1. A single police system will be more efficient

2. Economies will be possible

3. “Duplicity of command” will be avoided.

4. Better distribution of policing throughout the city will be possible.

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Tawes Approves Merger Of Park Police, City Force
The Sun (1837-1987); Mar 31, 1960;

pg. 36

Tawes Approves Merger Of Park Police, City Force

Governor Tawes has “given his blessing” to the proposed merger of the Park police with the Baltimore police force, city officials said yesterday.

Dr. Frank C Marino, president of the Park board, reports that development after he and other officials conferred with the governor at his Baltimore office.

The governor has agreed to take administrative steps that city legal aids have said are necessary in order to bring about the merger. Dr. Marino said

Hepbron at Meeting

he reported that James M Hepbron, police Commissioner who was also present at the meeting, has agreed to assign one of his inspectors to survey the Park police force and arrange for its integration into the city’s police department.

The inspector will spend part of his time with the Park police to determine which duties each man is best suited for and to discover which members need further training.

Dr. Marino said Governor Tawes is “with us 100%” on the city plan to merge the two police forces by January 1.

Agreement by the governor is necessary for several reasons, according to an opinion by Harrison L. Winter. City solicitor.

Police Strength Up

since the city police, which operates under the jurisdiction of the state government, are very near their us authorized strength, the written consent of both Governor Tawes and Mayor Grady must be obtained to bring the park officers in.

Mr. winter also discovered that the Park police derive their authority in Park property outside the city through special commissions given them by the governor. Similar commissions would have to be given to some city policeman so they could patrol those parks.

City officials will confer shortly with officials of Baltimore and Anne Arundel County’s to obtain their consent to use the city police to patrol city parks in their territories. Dr. Marino added.

He repeated his determination to merge the 126 man Park police force, which has been an arm of the Park board, with the city department by January 1. That date was selected because it is the beginning of the next city fiscal year

in Outlining the administrative steps that he said could accomplish the merger, Mr. Winter recommended that the city seek legislation in the Gen. assembly next year confirming the actions taken.

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NOTICE

How to Dispose of Old Police Items

If you come into possession of Police items from an Estate or Death of a Police Officer Family Member and do not know how to properly dispose of these items please contact: Retired Detective Ken Driscoll - Please dispose of POLICE Items: Badges, Guns, Uniforms, Documents, PROPERLY so they won’t be used IMPROPERLY. 

Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department.

Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

Copyright © 2012 Baltimore City Police History

Baltimore Has a Roistering Past

Once Known as the Wickedest City in the Country
16 September 1928
2 o’clock and all's well – all's well and Cornwallis is taken!

Old Middle District

Long ago with a narrow dirt streets of Baltimore Town the night watch, calling the hours, notified the sleeping populates that the 13 colonies had it last achieved in the freedom for which they had struggled so long.

With the birth of the new nation was born the Baltimore Police Department and organizations which had changed with the times, but which has survived in the growing pains of the early 19th century, the era when Baltimore was known as the wickedest city in the country, the Civil War riots and the railroad strikes, until the present day witnessed a police force of 16,000 men under Commissioner Gaither.

In 1775, when open hostility against the motherland was coming to a head a volunteer organization to guard the city from male factors which established, on which every adult male inhibited capable of performing the duties of watchmen was required to serve a specific time

Shortly after Cornwallis surrendered came the first paid night watchman, as Street lamps, an in event innovation in Baltimore town, were introduced in the community. The new illumination greatly reduce the crime and the thriving town and made the task of the Constable much easier. Anything favorable must’ve been appreciated, two, four in those days a watchmen was paid 3 pounds a month, unless $15

The familiar cries of 10 o’clock and all was well, - 5 o’clock and a rainy morning, continued without variation through the days and nights when the town was growing into a city, through the years of struggle and Barbary pirates, English men of war and French privateers, until 1843, when the monotonous calls were stilled forever. In that year the custom of calling the hours was abolished when taxpayers convinced city authorities that the loud cries sole value was to thieves, burgers and rogues, who were thereby notified of the whereabouts of the Constable and so enabled to commit their crimes elsewhere with impunity.

10 years later came the first large reorganization of the department. The pay of the marshal of the police was established at $1500 a year, a Capt. receives $13 a week and a patrolman $10 a week. In those days patrol wagons were undreamed of luxuries, and the police were forced to walk their prisoners to the station houses. In many cases officers had to carry drunken or injured persons on their shoulders or requisition passing vehicles.

On one occasion a patrolman in the Southwest district with an unconscious DRUNK on his hands hailed the driver of a passing hearse and deposited his charge in the vehicle of death. Mounting the box beside the driver the patrolman started the hearse on its way to the station house. The old narrative goes on, “All went well until the drunk, awakened by the jolting, set up opened his eyes, saw what kind of equipage he was riding in, and with a yell of terror plunged through the glass sides to the street, and sobered by his unusual experience, started to run!

In 1857 Baltimore, flooded like other cities with the “Know Nothing” ideas, became known as Mob Town. In this year almost 9000 arrests were made by the small police force of that day. Fights and riots were well of common occurrence and a fire was chiefly an excuse for starting a battle. Volunteer Fire Companies answered the alarm, instead of uniting with their efforts to check the blaze, would resent rival efforts and serious fights became the companies often resulted. In place of establishing fire lines, holding back the crowds and regulating traffic at the scene of the fire as the police do today, the patrolman of the 1850s were called upon to pacify the bickering fireman or to club them into insensibility and fight the fire themselves.

Corruption and graft were right, gangs ran unchecked, and the police were handicapped in their efforts by indulging and tainted magistrates, the release prisoners on “Straw Bail” almost as fast as they were locked up. One man was arrested 147 times by a Capt. Daniel Western district and was invariably released when he came up for hearing.

With the approach of the Civil War, days the populace became more and more unruly, gangs of youths below military age abounded in East Baltimore, police of that day were hats with large plumes, dark blue single breasted coats was standing collars, and dark blue trousers.

The youth of that day took exception to this uniform, the first ever warn by Baltimore police, they greeted the officers with the following doggerel:

We like Turkeys
We like Geese
But we don’t like
The New Police

With Lincoln’s election came the secession of the South Carolina, the formation of the Confederate states of America and a practical dismemberment of the Union. Buchanan compromised and pleaded, but took no decisive steps to avert the threat of chaos. Maryland like other border States knew not where to turn. Although her sympathies were largely Southern and or tendencies were toward secession, especially after Virginia left the Union, there were enough Unionist in the state to sway public opinion like a bubble wafted a fickle breeze.

In Baltimore minor clashes between northern and southern sympathizers were frequent, but as affairs came to a crisis the city leaned more and more toward the south. On April 19, 1861, when human passions had been supremely stirred by the events of the past few months and the city was seething and rest list, about 2000 troops from Massachusetts and Pennsylvania and route the Washington DC attempted to march through the streets of town getting from one railroad to another

The Baltimore Police Department have been formed of the troop’s movement and the force, under Marshal Kane, had made special preparations to avert riots. The troops were did disembark from their 35 cars at the Old Pres. Street station and were to be transported to Camden Station by force cars. The first nine carloads made the trip through the narrow, mob crowded, cobblestone streets and arrived safely at their destination, with a re-embarked for Washington under the watchful eyes of the police.

The crowd however gained courage with numbers and at last a few leading spirits inflamed the mob to action. The horse cars were one from the sales and demolished the crowd, working furiously with crowbars and sledgehammers, pride up the rails and destroyed the tracks. The small police force was powerless to stop the riders, but when it was decided to march the remainder of the troops through the city, a police guard under Marshal Kane, and Mayor Brown and the police Commissioner was formed to protect the van’s flank and rear. 

Leading Pres. Street station the March through the shouting, hooting, milling mobs to Camden Station was begun. Almost at once the crowd began to demonstrate, pressing against the police guard and hurling stones and bricks at the soldiers. Several policemen were struck by flying missiles. Although they were not seriously injured. At President and Fawn streets, two soldiers were knocked down by stones and so severely hurt that they died afterward, and several citizens were shot. The Massachusetts troops retaliated by firing into the crowd. The troops, escorted by the police, finally reached Camden station these tumultuous days continued throughout the Civil War.

Just after the city had run the gauntlet of war, it was visited in 1868 by a devastating flood which inundated all of the lower section of the town and turn streets in the rivers houses were flooded to their second-story windows and the swift rushing water threatened destruction to many blocks of dwellings. Policemen were turned overnight in the sailors an entire force, under the direction of Commissioner James E Carr, devoted itself to rescue and relief work. Both were secured and many persons were rescued from death in the swirling currents.

Commissioner car himself narrowly escaped drowning when he fell overboard from a small boat while attempting to rescue a Negro in the second floor of a house was swept from the site of his companions by the time and was reported drowned. His death was actually published in several Baltimore papers, but almost an hour after his fall into the waters, the Commissioner, still afloat, was cited by a group of men on the corner of Fayette and Harrison streets. He was almost exhausted, but was still struggling with the waves.

One of the men says an old account recognizing the Commissioner made him the odd Fellows sign of distress and China rope around his wrists swam out into the stream while the other end of the line was held by friends the Commissioner was ill for some weeks.

In the early 1870s Negro militia companies were founded companies which had no official status, but which nevertheless paraded, uniformed and armed. Through the streets the town some of the marchers became so arrogant at this order resulting in several persons being shot and killed. The police, after troublous times, finally managed to put an end to these organizations, but no sooner were they out of the way than the unhappy officers of the law were greeted with gang wars. The Game Cocks at Thames and Bond streets, the Double Pumps at bond and Lancaster, the Canton Rackers, the Found Knockers, the Skinners, the Stay-lates, and the Fountain Rackers, all caused trouble. The martial spirit of Civil War days pervaded the city, and these gangs bought up a large quantity of drums and arranged nightly parades.

Battles quickly followed with stones and clubs at first the only weapons, as in the old days, but finally the Skinners arm themselves with the old powder pistols of the day, making of the 70s a turbulent Period. 

In 1877 came the great Baltimore and Ohio Railroad strike which lasted almost a month and door in which scores were killed and hundreds wounded.

The strike started and Cumberland Maryland and when the old six Regiment, Maryland National Guard, was order to embark for Cumberland, a crowd of strike sympathizers gathered about the armory of the Regiment at Fayette and front streets. Officers of the Regiment ask for police protection, but the mob was so great, that the few policeman available at such short notice were unable to disperse the crowd. When the troops marched from the armory, the yelling thousands pressed upon the soldiers, greeting them with taunts and curses. One away could not be cleared for the March to Camden Station and order was given to fire in the air. 

This had no effect upon the mob, which was now ready for violence, and the men were ordered to fire into the crowd. The firing was general all along the way to Camden Station, the 12 men were killed and scores wounded. The fifth Regiment reached the station without firing a shot, but one barking the crowd set fire to the station and when the firemen arrived to quench the blaze they were set upon by the rioters and would have been driven off that the police had not opportunely rescued them. While the soldiers were waiting to embark, the police frequently charged to the mob, using their Espantoons, to drive back that hooting thousands.

The situation became worse and worse, and finally a detachment of men under the command of Deputy Marshal Jacob Fray, who was guarding the station, were forced to draw their revolvers and fired into the crowd. Some eight men were killed and a large number wounded, and about 50 arrest were made.

The situation finally passed beyond police control, although several hundred special officers were sworn in, including such well-known then as C Morton Stewart, Alexander M Green, William M Pegram, and E Wyatt Blanchard. All the local militia were called out, but was unable to cope with the moms. United States regulars from New York and other points were sent to the city and to war vessels with decks cleared and ready for action anchored at the Patapsco. Patrolling the narrow cobblestone gas lit streets was no easy task in those days. Many vicious characters roam the streets and some showed little respect or fear for the law or its representatives.

One night as Sgt., while patrolling a narrow, backstreet, that a gigantic deaf and dumb Negro, who was who was wanted for an assault.

The Sgt. placed the Negro under arrest and attempted to take him to the station house, but the giant black man held both the Sergeant’s arms and pick the policeman up, threw him over his shoulder like a sack of meal, and carried him up three flights of stairs in a house in the neighborhood. They are, in the attic, the Sgt. recognized three other Negroes of desperate character, and he realized that his life was in great danger.

He told the three Negroes that if they did not help him to arrest the deaf and dumb giant he would hound them forever, if he got away alive. The three scoundrels were frightened and taking sides with the Sergeant, the four men attempted to overpower the giant. Struggling, fighting, clawing with the giant Negro uttering the weirdest cries of the Dom, the five men stumbled, fell and rolled down the steps of the house to the sidewalk, where the policeman beat his ass band tune on to the pavement for help. Eight policemen were required before the Negro finally was subdued.

In 1883 the days of walking prisoners to police stations came to an end with the first police patrol came into being. It was patterned after the wagons used in Chicago and was described as a model of convenience. According to the old account of its advantages, it can binds lightness with strength, is conspicuous by its blackbody and bright red running gear and is tastefully marked and numbered. The first police patrol was a thing of never ceasing joy to the urchins of the city, and crowds would stare after it as it rattled down the rough streets. 

To be Baltimore patrolman in the 1880s and 1890s one needed not only brains and brawn. And inmate ability to grow braggadocio mustachios or long flowing beard was almost a necessity. Policemen with faces hidden behind a mass of whiskers were the rule, not the exception. A patrolman of those days, now a Lieut. in the Northwestern district said that when he joined the force the Commissioner ask him why he didn’t grow a beard. I told him I couldn’t, said the lieutenant laughing as a fitting accompaniment to things gone and forgotten, horses, as well as whiskers, were an important part of police equipment. The one worse patrol wagon was in use first, but sometimes later it gave way to its more glorious descendent, the two wars patrol. These old wagons used to gallop at full speed over the rough cobblestone streets, the bearded character excitingly climbing his gone to warn careless pedestrians. Small boy used to gape and wonder, then as now, and follow curiously the progress of a prisoner to the station house.

For a long time said a Sgt. at the Western they would let us have tops to cover the wagons, said the tops would hide the view with the people on the streets and they were afraid the police would be the prisoner. So we as to ride around in the rain and snow until finally in 1896 I believe it was they gave us tops.

The days of the 1890s were long before that of the municipal ambulance system, consequently when injuries occurred the strong police patrol used to be pressed into service as an ambulance. A canvas like contraption suspended by springs to spare the patient the jolts caused by the rough streets was rigged between the seats in each wagon fortunately automobile accidents never occurred in those times and traffic mishaps were few and far between. Different to where the uniforms and equipment of the old-time police. Long coats that reach halfway to the knee were in style, with a three button jumper underneath. Sometimes a vest was born, but more generally under the open code only the jumper showed. The star shaped badges the old helmet which used to keep your ears warm were featured of the equipment of the day.

For a while when Col. Swan was Commissioner we were cork helmets in the summer when one the veteran. Hatched just like the white wings you know. The Commissioner had been down in Panama and he thought the helmet would be comfortable for us in the hot weather. So they were warned to but the first rain they used to melt up and change shape and droop so we got rid of them. Shortly after the installation of the old horse-drawn patrol wagon there came the installation of the box signal and call system and the patrolling of Baltimore streets and the maintenance of peace and order took another upward bound

Athletes, too, began to be recognized, and police gymnasiums were established in the various district station houses. Pictures of old-time athletes depicted brawny men with chest expanding and biceps pushed out, posing proudly, their faces obscured by the luxuriant whiskers of the day.

Active in the athletic work of those days was Capt. Charles H Claiborne, of the southern district, and besides the promoting of athletes he succeeded in the clearing out many of the crooks and gamblers and reading his section of the city of their presence. Capt. Claiborne had served as a first lieutenant in the South Carolina infantry during the Civil War, and during the bombardment of Fort Sumter by federal gunboats in 1862 he had climbed to the top of the parapet and under murderous enemy fire had nailed back to the broken staff the Confederate colors which had been torn down by a chance cannonball. 

With the beginning of the 20th century, although the police force and its methods had advanced with the times, Baltimore was still experiencing acute growing pains, and perhaps the after effects of the Spanish-American war had given a new stimulus to the gang battle prevalent all over the city, especially in the eastern section.

Gang battles were fought in back of Patterson Park and the clay hills and gullies which ran southeastward to Highland town became a veritable no man’s land. In fact the highest Clay Hill was called Bunker Hill. The Bluebirds the Canton Rackers and other gangs actually fought in some semblance of military order, and firearms were used at times by those young ruffians, although the slingshot was the most use weapon.

Some of these young gangsters later became full-fledged criminals, says an old account. One of the most dangerous bands of safe blowers that ever operated in this country made their headquarters in the 700 block of S. Caroline St. Thanks post offices and stores throughout rural Marilyn and many such places in this state and other states were burglarized by this notorious band. They recruited during young boys and train them to be finders were in the vocabulary gay. Their duties were to scout around the town or village in which the bank to be looted was located. Because of their youth they arose little if any suspicion, and then to if picked up by the police they had no criminal record. The police of Baltimore in 1904 exterminated the last of these yeggmen men having fixed headquarters here. The youngest member of that gang was only 17 years old. He died at the Carolina Street headquarters of pneumonia resulting from exposure. 

Strange and different were the scenes of those days

Patrolman taking prisoners to the station houses in their topless horse-drawn patrol would frequently have trouble with the captive and it used to be a common sight to see a prisoner vault the rail of the patrol wagon and jump into the street. The policeman would leap after him and exciting chase would begin.

Flickering gas lights lit the police stations, and silk had it, speeded and came carrying reporters lowered the languidly before the desks. One of fire alarm was sounded in the ancient apparatus started pumping down the streets, the young gentleman of the press would call a horse-drawn hack and be driven by some old Negro cavity to the scene of the conflagration.

It was not thought an incongruous spectacle is a silk had it reporter, carrying a cane, mounted the box beside the driver of the patrol wagon and accompanied the police on some of their ventures into the notorious locus point, Kaufman’s court, and Sandy bottom sections of Baltimore the Northwestern section of the city was then known as the silk stocking or fashionable district, and what is now Roland Park and Guilford was then open country. The southern and eastern parts of the city were rendezvous of the criminal, and many were the adventurous which present-day captains, and spectators and lieutenants, had while patrolling their beats in peach alley and other dangerous criminal localities 

Election days were signals for general gang fights and disorder, and wholesale arrests were made by the Police Department. Station houses were crowded overflowing by the prisoners were kept under lock and key until the polls closed, when they were set free.

Go to roamed at large over the city streets, and Baltimore, in places, resemble the goat festive islands of Malta. An ordinance passed long ago, providing that a goat roaming at large in public property, finally put an end to the animals. In 1904 came the great conflagration, a blaze was destroyed not only property but took a long with it the dreams, customs and habits of the past amid which Baltimore had lived, and created from the ashes of the dreamy city, a new town, body ideas and habits far into the old.

With the dawn of the new inventions and with the growing bustle of the 20th century commercial city the police force changed also. Soon the old uniforms, the ancient horse drone patrols and the old weapons disappeared, and there came to replace them with a high powered automobile today, the automatic pistol, teargas and all the modern inventions of a change in age. Even now the change is incomplete, and slowly fading into the past are the familiar blue coats with high standing collars which button tightly around the neck. To replace them, came they naughtier, double-breasted, rolled collar and brass buttoned blouse adopted some years ago by the Army and Navy. 

Changed to are the Department’s and the new districts. Baltimore once a town with a few volunteer night watchman, is now guarded by a paid police force of more than 1600 men and the city is divided into seven districts and bracing great areas of land.

The traffic department came into being when an air of modern transportation arrived, and even the harbor has its own police. Riot and machine guns are part of the equipment, and in this age of aviation it may not be long before Baltimore has aerial police division to direct traffic of the skies, tagging planes for various violations and maintaining the peace and order of the heavens with the same patients which marks the efforts of the watchmen and constables of the Baltimore town long ago

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POLICE INFORMATION

Copies of: Your Baltimore Police Department Class Photo, Pictures of our Officers, Vehicles, Equipment, Newspaper Articles relating to our department and or officers, Old Departmental Newsletters, Lookouts, Wanted Posters, and or Brochures. Information on Deceased Officers and anything that may help Preserve the History and Proud Traditions of this agency. Please contact Retired Detective Kenny Driscoll. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

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NOTICE

How to Dispose of Old Police Items


If you come into possession of Police items from an Estate or Death of a Police Officer Family Member and do not know how to properly dispose of these items please contact: Retired Detective Ken Driscoll - Please dispose of POLICE Items: Badges, Guns, Uniforms, Documents, PROPERLY so they won’t be used IMPROPERLY.

 
Devider color with motto

Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department. Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222 - Rolland Fullen

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll

Pawnshop Unit

Tuesday, 14 January 2020 05:31 Written by
Pawnshop History BPD

21 July 1909

To Keep Tabs on Pawnshops
Col. Swann Once Law Regarding Daily Reports of Deals

To help the police keep tabs on secondhand dealers and pawnbrokers who by stolen goods, Col. Sherlock Swann, President of the Board of Police Commissioners, will have introduced into the next Legislature a bill compelling Three-Ball Experts to make daily reports to the police Headquarters their purchases of valuables. Laws like this are in existence in nearly every other city.

“It is very important,” said Col. Swann yesterday, “that we have such a law in Baltimore. I do not say this simply because other cities have it, but only because it is necessary to keep tabs on stolen articles.

"I hope that when the bill is introduced at the coming Legislature it will pass, for it will be of great help to our department. Such a law affords the police the opportunity to recover the stolen property if the thieves are not caught. “Marshall Farnan warmly approved of the idea. "It's a necessity," said the Marshal. "To do good work we have to be able to date, and we should, by all means, have a system of knowing what jewelry is bought by secondhand dealers and pawnbrokers."

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Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the Historic and Heroic... the men and women of the Baltimore Police Department who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department.

Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll

1968 Riot Ribbon

Wednesday, 11 September 2013 03:17 Written by

Only sworn member of the department on duty in the City of Baltimore during the period of civil unrest, 5 April through 14 April 1968, were eligible for this award.