Patrolman William R Myers

Monday, 22 August 2022 23:57

Patrolman William R Myers

The Evening Sun Wed Sep 27 1933 72Click above article or HERE to see full size article

Patrolman William R Myers died on 27 Sept 1933 at home a week after leaving his post due to a heart attack. He had complaining for years of the stress put on him by his post near Lexington Market, that stress had him moved from directing pedestrian and vehicular traffic by hand, to working a Semaphore. It can be a tough job, and while he didn't actually die on his post, from his complaints it is obvious his post as one of the original "Beauty Squad" took its toll on him and was documented over the years. Aside from remembering him on this day, take a look at his history and the history of the Beauty Squad and some of the ways they directed traffic over the years before forming the Traffic squad. 

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If you have copies of: your Baltimore Police Department Class Photo, Pictures of our Officers, Vehicles, Equipment, Newspaper Articles relating to our department and or officers, Old Departmental Newsletters, Lookouts, Wanted Posters, and or Brochures. Information on Deceased Officers and anything that may help Preserve the History and Proud Traditions of this agency. Please contact Retired Detective Kenny Driscoll.

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How to Dispose of Old Police Items

Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department. Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll 

Baltimore's Police Lost Control in 90 Minutes

BY SAM FRIZELL

APRIL 28, 2015 11:52 PM EDT

On school days in western Baltimore, local kids gather at a drab shopping center called Mondawmin Mall where bus routes begin and end. On Monday, the hangout became the scene of a riot.

Policing experts who reconstructed the events of the day said that Baltimore police did not send enough officers to the situation at the start, FAILED TO QUICKLY MAKE ARRESTS ONCE TROUBLE BEGAN and did not deploy additional officers quickly enough. Key decisions led the situation to spiral out of control in a short 90 minutes, a lesson other police departments should heed.

Baltimore’s police force was prepared for more unrest related to the death of Freddie Gray, a black man who suffered a spinal injury while in police custody. Messages on social media seemed to be goading students to violence, so police went to the mall in riot gear by around 3 p.m. Still, they went prepared for typical high school rebellion, NOT A FULL-BLOWN RIOT.

“When we deployed our officers yesterday, we were deploying for a high school event,” Baltimore Capt. J. Kowalczyk told reporters.

Baltimore cops are trained to handle violent crowds, former police officials told TIME. Officers are drilled in maneuvers — how to form defensive lines, what formations to stand in, how to divide and conquer a crowd. But while police can practice arrests, subduing suspects and even home assaults, there is no real preparation for an angry mob like facing an actual angry mob. In the 90 minutes that Mondawmin Mall transformed from transit hub to a riot scene, Baltimore police were outnumbered and TOO PASSIVE in pursuing arrests, experts said.

The timeline of Monday’s unrest goes something like this. By 3:30 p.m., the students were throwing bottles and bricks at police officers. They were ordered to disperse, but the violence escalated as officers were injured. By 4:30 rioters were setting fires and making their way downtown. The police were unable to stop them. “I was there. I saw our reaction. I gave directions to advance,” Baltimore’s Police Commissioner Anthony Batts said. “They outnumbered us and outflanked us.”

The officers at Mondawmin Mall were too small a group to properly handle the crowd of that size, experts said. There were enough officers at the mall to hold a line and some property, but NOT enough to penetrate the crowd and make arrests, says Neill Franklin, who oversaw Baltimore police training from 2000 to 2004. “You’ve got to have enough boots on the ground,” said Franklin. “Without that, there’s nothing you can do. You’ll be overwhelmed very quickly.” Also important for policing is a deep familiarity with surrounding streets and alleys. In order to secure an area, Franklin said, “police should know all the access and exit points, where protestors can maneuver themselves to and from.”

Before backup arrived, the police officers stationed on the streets around Mondawmin Mall were unable to arrest stone-throwers quickly enough to snuff out the violence.

For a crucial hour and a half on Monday afternoon, they were pelted with rocks as high school and middle-school students ran through the streets. Outnumbered, the officers were forced to retreat and hold their lines, and the crowd quickly got out of control. “The moment the first bottle or the first rock is thrown first, or the first officer is assaulted, action has to be taken,” said Jon Shane, associate professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. “And it has to be swift, and it has to be firm.” Much of the crowd had already moved downtown by the time enough police had arrived to make arrests.

Overall, the problem seems to be that police were too passive, an ironic situation given that the protests were related to overly aggressive police tactics.

The Baltimore Police Department has in recent years sought to tone down aggression. A comprehensive retraining in the late 2000s connected Baltimore cops with young people in the city, while the top brass has warned officers repeatedly in recent months not to overstep behavioral bounds. “In past years, had there been riots like this there isn’t any question there would have been many hundreds of arrests,” said Adam Walinsky, a onetime advisor to former Attorney General Robert Kennedy who led Baltimore’s program to retrain its city police from 2007 to 2012. But with tight police oversight, Walinsky added, “what are they supposed to do?

It didn’t help that Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake gave mixed signals in the days before the riots. The police were instructed “to do everything they could to make sure the protestors were able to exercise their right to free speech. It’s a very delicate balancing act,” Rawlings-Blake said, adding, “we also gave those who wished to destroy space to do that as well.” She later walked back her comments, and expressed outrage that property was being looted. But much of officers’ restraint can be attributed to the appearance of hesitancy at higher levels, critics say.

Still, the police department’s tepid response to the first hour and a half of violence may have actually saved lives. Years of close training meant that despite all the police injuries, no police fired on the crowd, and no protestors were killed. “What I was impressed with is when they had bricks thrown at them, the police officers held their fire,” said Ret. General Russel L. Honoré, who led operations and brought calm to New Orleans in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. “The police showed extraordinary restraint.”

Compared with the Los Angeles riots of 1992, when 53 people were killed, or the Baltimore riots of 1968 when more than 600 were injured, the unrest has so far been relatively tame. “Police have been really great example of being reserved of not doing some of the things we’ve seen in other cities,” said Franklin. “They are really doing their best not to make things worse by being overly aggressive.

After the showdown at Mondawmin Mall, the west Baltimore kids were joined by adults who burned buildings and looted on their way downtown. By Tuesday morning, 19 police officers had been injured, 15 buildings and 144 cars were set on fire, and more than 200 people had been arrested. For millions at home watching these scenes of looting and night fires on television, the violence looked similar to the riots that unfolded in Ferguson aa year earlier. Unlike Ferguson, though, there were no rubber bullets, assault rifles, or fleets of heavily armored vehicles. In the first hour and a half of the riots, there was just a hapless group of Baltimore police officers, struggling to contain a crowd that was too big, and too unpredictable.

In a larger sense, the decisions made by the Mayor, and city council, the police commissioner and other police leaders, for the streets in Baltimore on that day in 2015 don’t much matter. It’s the long game of improving police community relations that counts. Many have urged the Justice Department to provide more funding for police training and special programs. “This problem didn’t start last night or last week or when Freddie Gray got died,” said Walinsky, the Baltimore police reformer. “Once a riot starts, it’s a little late.

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17 Days

April 18, 2015 – May 3, 2015

12 April 2015, Baltimore Police Department officers arrested Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old resident of Baltimore. Gray's neck and spine were injured while he was in a police vehicle causing him to enter into a coma. On 18 April, there were protests in front of the Western District Police Station. Gray died on the 19th of April. 

Further protests were organized after Gray's death became known publicly, amid the police department's continuing inability to adequately or consistently explain the events following the arrest, and Gray's injuries. More and more pockets of spontaneous protests began. After the funeral service, several of the protests crossed the line of protests, into rioting with the addition of violent and destructive elements. Civil unrest continued with at least twenty police officers injured, and more than 250 arrests, 350 businesses were damaged, 150 vehicle fires, 60 structure fires, 27 drugstores burglarized and looted, thousands of police and the Maryland National Guard troops were deployed, a state of emergency was declared within the limits of Baltimore City. That state of emergency was lifted on May 6. The series of protests took place against a historical backdrop of racial and poverty issues in Baltimore.

On May 1, 2015, Gray's death was ruled by the medical examiner to be a homicide. Six officers were charged with various offenses, including second-degree murder, in connection with Gray's death. Three officers went to trial, evidence was offered, and heard before they were all three subsequently acquitted. In July of 2016, following the three acquittals, Baltimore City State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby realizing she had overcharged with little to no evidence was forced to drop the charges against the remaining three officers. 

 

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POLICE INFORMATION

If you have copies of: your Baltimore Police Department Class Photo, Pictures of our Officers, Vehicles, Equipment, Newspaper Articles relating to our department and or officers, Old Departmental Newsletters, Lookouts, Wanted Posters, and or Brochures. Information on Deceased Officers and anything that may help Preserve the History and Proud Traditions of this agency. Please contact Retired Detective Kenny Driscoll.

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Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department. Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll 

Medal of Tactical De-Escalation

Tuesday, 28 June 2022 04:51

Medal of Tactical De-Escalation

14 Medal of de escalation

Awarded by the police commissioner to sworn members who utilized exceptional tactical skills or verbal approaches and techniques to de-escalate a situation presenting a threat of deadly force or serious bodily harm. Such interventions must be above and beyond the normal course and scope of duty, and must have resulted in either a peaceful outcome, or an outcome where the danger to a person was greatly mitigated in spite of the member being authorized to use a serious or lethal degree of force.

 
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Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department. Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll 

Problem-Solving Ribbon

Tuesday, 28 June 2022 04:45

 

Problem-Solving Ribbon

cr

Awarded to sworn or civilian personnel for a notable achievement resulting in increased community trust and collaboration, improved planning and execution of community policing strategies, substantial savings in operational costs, or an enhanced quality of life for a specific Baltimore community. The act(s) must be representative of performance beyond the expectations of normal work assignments.

 

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POLICE INFORMATION

If you have copies of: your Baltimore Police Department Class Photo, Pictures of our Officers, Vehicles, Equipment, Newspaper Articles relating to our department and or officers, Old Departmental Newsletters, Lookouts, Wanted Posters, and or Brochures. Information on Deceased Officers and anything that may help Preserve the History and Proud Traditions of this agency. Please contact Retired Detective Kenny Driscoll.

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How to Dispose of Old Police Items

Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department. Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll 

Officer Robert Wayne Peregoy

Friday, 21 January 2022 19:59

Officer Robert W. Peregoy

Officer Robert W PeregoyThe Baltimore Sun Wed Dec 16 2009 Click the above article to enlarge

More details

NameDescription
End of Watch 14 December 2009
City, St. SB - I795
Panel Number N/A
Cause of Death           Heart Attack
Weapon N/A
District Worked Western

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How to Dispose of Old Police Items

Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department. Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll 

Retired Officer Calvin McCleese

Tuesday, 28 December 2021 17:52

Retired Officer Calvin McCleese

Retired Officer Calvin McCleese

On 5 March 1989 – Retired Officer Calvin McCleese would die effecting an arrest in his neighborhood - For years the toll bridge at the end of Dundalk Ave in Baltimore County was closed, it sat unused and inoperable. Even longer than that it was under the watchful eye of one of our Department’s finest; Southeast District’s Officer Calvin McCleese lived on the corner of Dundalk Ave and Bullneck Rd. just across the street from the bridge and Watersedge Park, the ladies and gentlemen that collected tolls were safe from anyone trying to bring them harm. Even though its location is in the county, like his family, and his post, Officer McCleese protected his neighborhood. He had two sons Michael, and Jeff that would also grow up to be Police.

Calvin McCleese worked his entire career with the Baltimore Police Department all in the same area since his joining in 1957. He started out in Eastern District's Southeast Substation until 1958/59 when Southeast Station House on Eastern Ave. opened. The kind of police Calvin was; on 22 Jan 1970, while patrolling in Highland town, he grew suspicious of a car parked around the corner from The Chesapeake Federal Savings and Loan. Officer McCleese approached the car just as the car’s tag number was broadcast over his radio in a report about a bank robbery at The Chesapeake S&L. Officer McCleese pulled his handgun and single-handedly captured the two men in the car, one of which was armed with a sawed-off shotgun. But that was 1970, and that was the way Officer McCleese worked.

He retired from the department in 1985 and went on to be the typical retired police… He still looked out for his family and his neighborhood… until this day in 1989 when a vehicle being operated by a drunk driver either not knowing the bridge was closed, or just plain lost control, but it hit the bridge embankments, had an accident and his car burst into flames… Retired Officer McCleese ran to the driver’s aid, after breaking the windows and getting the driver out, the driver woke up. Fearing he would be arrested for DWI, and an out of state warrant he decided he would fight the man that just came to his aid and saved his life. Having just fought his way into a burning car, and getting a man out, then realizing the man was drunk, Officer McCleese wasn’t about to just let him go. So he fought back, subduing the individual until Baltimore County Police would show up on scene, laying on top of him pinning him down when police arrived and took over the arrest. Officer McCleese had had a heart attack which he would succumb to on scene. Officer McCleese had held on for as long as he could. His last action in his life was to first save a life, and then to effect an arrest of a drunk driver and wanted fugitive.

Those that knew him, knew how much he loved being a Baltimore Police Officer, the pride he had in wearing our badge, and while he had already been retired for a few years, he died on this day in 1989 doing what he loved best… serving his community. BTW, one of the ladies P/O McCleese was intent on guarding at that toll booth was his wife, Rebecca McCleese the mother of his two sons.

May he never be forgotten as "His service "Honored" the City of Baltimore and the Police Department" God bless and RIP

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Donations

Donations help with web hosting, stamps and materials and the cost of keeping the website online. Thank you so much for helping BCPH. 

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POLICE INFORMATION

If you have copies of: your Baltimore Police Department Class Photo, Pictures of our Officers, Vehicles, Equipment, Newspaper Articles relating to our department and or officers, Old Departmental Newsletters, Lookouts, Wanted Posters, and or Brochures. Information on Deceased Officers and anything that may help Preserve the History and Proud Traditions of this agency. Please contact Retired Detective Kenny Driscoll.

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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NOTICE

How to Dispose of Old Police Items

Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department. Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll 

Officer Keona Holley

Thursday, 23 December 2021 23:43

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Two suspects charged in shooting of Baltimore police officer

Two suspects in the Thursday shooting of a Baltimore police officer who was sitting in her patrol vehicle are in custody, police said.

The duo — Elliiot Knox and Travon Shaw — was charged with attempted murder in the shooting of Officer Keona Holley, as well as with murder for shooting 27-year-old Justin Johnson nearby, the Baltimore Police Department announced Friday.

The gunmen approached Holley — now in critical but stable condition, according to CNN — from behind around 1:30 a.m. Thursday and opened fire, hitting her multiple times, police said.

She was shot twice in the head, once in the leg and once in the hand, according to documents obtained by the Baltimore Sun.

Both alleged shooters had criminal histories, according to a report.

Officer Keona Holley, who was shot twice in the head, once in the leg and once in the hand, is in critical but stable condition.

Facebook

Shaw, 32, was awaiting trial in Baltimore County for a March 2020 arrest for being a felon in possession of a firearm, The Sun reported, citing courts records. He reportedly had a previous conviction for armed robbery and assault from a 2006 case.

Knox, 31, was convicted of three armed robberies in 2006, when he was 16 and sentenced to 15 years in prison.

Travon Shaw.

Travon Shaw reportedly had a previous conviction for armed robbery and assault from a 2006 case.

Baltimore Police Department via AP

Elliot Knox.

Elliot Knox was convicted of three armed robberies in 2006.

Baltimore Police Department via AP

Investigators found weapons allegedly used in the pair of shootings, the police department said.

“What we now know is that both shootings are related,” Police Commissioner Michael Harrison said during a news conference. “As we now know the perpetrators of Officer Holley’s shooting, they then left that scene, went to Lucia Avenue and then committed that homicide of Justin Johnson.”

“These incidents are tragic reminds of the culture of violence that pervades Baltimore. Life is precious and sacred but unfortunately there are those who have no regard for it,” Harrison said in a statement, blasting the “cowards responsible” for the shooting.

“No family should have to endure this type of heartache over the holidays, so please keep Officer Holley’s family and the entire community in your prayers.”

State Attorney for Baltimore Marilyn Mosby pledged to prosecute the suspects “to the fullest extent of the law.”

“We will have zero tolerance for those who seek to use violence and murder to settle their grievances. And the criminals that do will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law,” she said, according to CNN.”

Keona Holley

The State Attorney for Baltimore pledged to prosecute the suspects in Holley’s shooting “to the fullest extent of the law.”

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As officer Holley continues to fight and fight for her life, we vow to her, her family, her colleagues, this community that we will get justice on her behalf — for every victim that has been affected by these heinous acts of violence, we will get justice on their behalf.”

Holley, 39, was working an overtime shift in the Curtis Bay neighborhood when she was shot, according to the Baltimore Sun.

On Saturday, NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea on Twitter expressed his support for the wounded Baltimore cop.

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23 Dec 2021

 

Updated 6:04 PM, Dec 23, 2021

BALTIMORE — After deteriorating health and a fight for her life, Holley's family as well as medical officials made a difficult decision.

Baltimore Police Commissioner Michael Harrison and the Baltimore Police Department announce that Officer Keona Holley has been removed from life-support.

 

“Our prayers are with Officer Holley’s family and loved ones, co-workers and the entire community. I thank her and the entire BPD community for their commitment, service and sacrifice. We mourn Officer Holley’s death together and we will heal together,” said Commissioner Harrison.

The department is extending the offer of any support and assistance officers who may need it as free and confidential counseling services are available for all BPD employees. The BPD also continues to support Officer Holley’s family.

“I offer my deepest condolences to the family, friends and colleagues of Officer Keona Holley, a devoted public servant who worked selflessly to protect our community,” said Mayor Brandon Scott. “Baltimore will never forget Officer Holley’s sacrifice and commitment to making a difference in her beloved city. I ask that everyone please keep Officer Holley’s family in your prayers as they endure the holiday season without their mother, daughter, sister and loyal friend.”

The Signal 13 foundation is providing assistance to the family in their time of need. Those who wish to provide financial support to Officer Holley’s family, may do so through the Signal 13 website at signal13foundation.org. You can designate your support for Officer Holley’s family, by writing “In support of Officer Holley” in the notes box or in the memo field of a written check.

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Police Commissioner Harrison provides update on Officer Holley’s condition
 
23 December 2021
 
Baltimore, MD (23 December 2021) – It is with heavy hearts that Commissioner Michael Harrison and the Baltimore Police Department announce that Officer Keona Holley has been removed from life-support. Her health has been deteriorating over the last couple of days and her family, in consultation with her doctors, has had to make the most difficult decision. Since Officer Holley’s shooting, Dr. Thomas Scalea and the medical staff at the Shock Trauma Center at the University of Maryland Medical Center have provided her with the best medical care in the world. The Baltimore Police Department thanks them for all of their efforts. However, it was Officer Holley’s valiant fight for her life, which has brought her this far. Her strength, courage and resilience are an inspiration to us all.
 
“Our prayers are with Officer Holley’s family and loved ones, co-workers and the entire community. I thank her and the entire BPD community for their commitment, service and sacrifice. We mourn Officer Holley’s death together and we will heal together,” said Commissioner Harrison.
 
“I offer my deepest condolences to the family, friends and colleagues of Officer Keona Holley, a devoted public servant who worked selflessly to protect our community,” said Mayor Brandon Scott. “Baltimore will never forget Officer Holley’s sacrifice and commitment to making a difference in her beloved city. I ask that everyone please keep Officer Holley’s family in your prayers as they endure the holiday season without their mother, daughter, sister and loyal friend.”
 
Due to the tragic and traumatic events experienced by the BPD community over the last couple weeks, the department is extending the offer of any support and assistance officers may need. Free and confidential counseling services are available for all BPD employees. The BPD also continues to support Officer Holley’s family – as we do for all members of the force.
The Signal 13 foundation is providing assistance to the family in their time of need. Those who wish to provide financial support to Officer Holley’s family, may do so through the Signal 13 website at signal13foundation.org and click on the “Donate” button. Please designate your support for Officer Holley’s family, by writing “In support of Officer Holley” in the notes box or in the memo field of a written check.
The Signal 13 Foundation is a nonprofit 501(c)3 established to support Baltimore Police and their families in times of need. Signal 13 provides financial hardship grants and college scholarships for the children of police personnel. All donations are tax deductible. Any donations received in the name of Officer Keona Holley will be used to support her family.
 
There will, of course, be ways that we can ensure that Officer Holley’s spirit and legacy live on in this Department and this City. Those conversations will be had with her family and colleagues after we get through this somber and difficult period. However, the best way to honor Officer Holley, is to continue her mission of making Baltimore a safer place for everyone.
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Family of fallen Officer Keona Holley has a Christmas Eve message on crime
24 Dec 2021

On this Christmas Eve, the family of Baltimore police Officer Keona Holley is mourning, and they're speaking out.

Although it's the time of year to be with the ones you love, for her family - and the police department - this holiday will be about planning a funeral.

Officer Holley was pulled off life support Thursday, a week after she was ambushed in a shooting in Curtis Bay.

But Holley's sister, Lawanda Sykes, and mother, Karen Eaddy, say on this night before Christmas there's still joy, peace, and a reason to be part of the season.

"I wish everybody a Merry Christmas. I mean, it's still merry to me because I have my grandkids," said Eaddy. "I may not have my child but I have my grandkids. So, I have to lift myself up and lift them up to have Christmas without their mom."

Holley, who joined the Baltimore police force two years ago, was a 39-year-old mother with four children, the youngest a 10-year-son.

Holley's sister says they intend to have a joyful holiday but admits, amid the upbeat spirit, the pain and tears remain.

"The tears, they will never go away; they will always be there. But those tears also hold memories. They hold laughter, they hold joy. They hold her life, her essence, her spirit," said Sykes.

Police say Holley was shot several times while sitting in her police car early that morning December 16 in south Baltimore. She was shot in the head while working an overtime shift.

Holley had been on life support at the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center until Thursday, when her family made the difficult decision to remove her from life support, two days before Christmas.

"That, I don't think we're ready to talk about. Too soon for that," said Sykes.

But Sykes is talking about the seemingly-out-of-control gun violence that's happening across the city, and the violent crime that cost her sister her life. Her plea now: Stop the violence.

"Something has to be done about it. Whether it comes from our politicians or police department, whatever, no matter what. But, the message has to go to the person who's picking up the gun," said Sykes.

Police have arrested and charged two men in the shooting, Elliott Knox and Travon Shaw. They're the same men, police say, who shot and killed Justin Johnson 90 minutes after shooting Holley.

And on this night before Christmas, one sister has a message to her sister's suspected killers.

"Everybody does not have or was given the love that my sister had, and maybe that was missing from them. The only hope that I can find is as that they find forgiveness in God," said Sykes.

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NOTICE

How to Dispose of Old Police Items

Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department. Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll 

Baltimore Police Sword

Wednesday, 06 October 2021 04:23

police sword

The Baltimore Police Sword

Commemorating
The 200th. Anniversary
 
of the  Baltimore City Police Department

These swords were made available in 1984 to members of the department. The sword is 34” in length. Made by the Wilkinson Sword Company in England. The blade is engraved with all the important events of the Baltimore Police Department and that of Baltimore from 1634 thru the end of 1976. The blade also has engraved the 5 badges that the department has used since their beginning.  

The sword pictured here is #58 of only 152 made, it was originally owned by Thomas B. Badlik then apparently sold to Sgt. Thomas Bradley of the Traffic Division, Motorcycle Section who attended his Final Roll Call. After this Bill Hackley obtained it and had it in his personal collection until his passing  

The original price of the sword was $278.00 There were 152 made, the #1 going to Commissioner Bishop Robinson.(Actually the office of the Police Commissioner) #152 went to the Baltimore Police Dept. Museum.  

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The Baltimore Police Sword

   sword
sword3 sword4

sword5 sword6

~Sword of Honor~”  

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British Ceremonial Imports Ltd.  

The Baltimore Police Sword is manufactured from a 10th Century  

Knightly model of which there were a large number of styles befitting his station.  

The 10th Century sword was a straight and not a very long-bladed weapon, with a simple cross-shaped quillon and a relatively short grip terminated by a bell-shaped or round pommel.  

Towards the 13th Century, the blade became longer and the grip larger. While the pommel assumed a great variety of shapes ranging from a simple ball, a Norman-like helmet to a disc, a mushroom-shape, a semi-circle or a crenelated boss. *  

*BOSS - A circular prominence; a knob or projecting ornament.

Swords similar to the Baltimore Police Sword with cross-shaped quillons are found everywhere in the West, used by fighting men from the Northern European countries to the Mediterranean and even as far as North Africa and the Sahara, where the TOVAREGS still nowadays use a similar type.

  

  Wilk Sword 

WILKINSON SWORD

Sole Distributor

Baltimore Police Department 200th Anniversary Commemorative Sword of Honor With our permission, Wilkinson Sword Limited of London, England, U. K. will be honored to manufacture, in a single world-wide limited edition, made available only to members of the Baltimore Police Department, and under no circumstances made available to the general public a limited edition commemorates the history of the Baltimore Police Department. The sword, which is of intrinsic value in terms of sentiment and in line with the tradition of one of the oldest uniform services, is symbolic of authority. It is also symbolic of our tradition. It occupies a significant place in the statue of justice, where the sword is held in one hand and the weighing scales in the other.

The world-renowned sword smiths of Wilkinson Sword Limited of London, England, will hand forge the Baltimore Police Department 200th Anniversary Commemorative Sword of Honor This modern presentation sword will be approximately 30 inches in length.- Its blade will be hardened and tempered. The cross piece, shell guard, and pommel will be heavily plated in 18 ct. gold. The grip will be made of Rosewood and will be hand French polished to a mirror finish. On the sword's blade, the swordsmiths will make historical etchings of the Baltimore Police Department, its artifacts directly relating to the history of same. The limited edition will be individually numbered, commencing with number 001 which will be presented to the Commissioner of Police. To accompany the sword will be a numbered certificate of Authenticity. The names and addresses of each recipient will be entered into the registers of British Ceremonial imports Limited for all time. The Baltimore Police Department 200th. Anniversary Commemorative.  

Sword of Honor will be a legacy of history, which can be passed along to future generations of families, to serve as a reminder of the recipient's participation in the Baltimore Police Department. The recipient will also take pride in owning one of the finest examples of craftsmanship ever created; the artistry-in-steel, a rare and unusual showpiece which can be exhibited and enjoyed.  

The sword will be made available exclusively through a designated official of the Baltimore Police Department, on a first come first served basis. Prompt action in ordering will result in securing the lowest registry number. Anyone interested in purchasing a sword, please contact the Director, Property Division, 396-2575. An example sword made for the Marine Corps by Wilkinson Sword is on display in the Museum.  This information was from the original brochure for the BPD Commemorative Sword furnished by Retired Major Robert DeStefano


- Thanks to Retired Sergeant William Stone, there will be more info on this sword to come - 

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Donations

Donations help with web hosting, stamps and materials and the cost of keeping the website online. Thank you so much for helping BCPH. 

Paypal History Donations

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POLICE INFORMATION

If you have copies of: your Baltimore Police Department Class Photo, Pictures of our Officers, Vehicles, Equipment, Newspaper Articles relating to our department and or officers, Old Departmental Newsletters, Lookouts, Wanted Posters, and or Brochures. Information on Deceased Officers and anything that may help Preserve the History and Proud Traditions of this agency. Please contact Retired Detective Kenny Driscoll.

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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NOTICE

How to Dispose of Old Police Items

Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department. Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll  

 
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