Line of Duty and On Duty Deaths

Officers that have died in the line of duty or while working as well as officers that have died as a result of line of duty injuries, or line of duty illness. Not every fallen officer will, or should receive the Medal of Honor, not all will be considered a hero, but anyone that dies as a result of a line of duty injury, or illness did make the ultimate sacrifice and does deserve to be remembered for that sacrifice to the communities they served. The following is a list of 205 sworn Baltimore Police Officers that gave their lives for the job. Added to the list bringing it up to 206 is one honorary police officer, he was a tailor that risked his life to save the life of a police officer under attack, for his efforts he was shot and paralyzed, after several years he died as a result of complications brought on from the bullet left in him. This list also contains officers that were infected with viruses, sufferer heart attacks, and suffered other illness brought on by the job as well as other injuries that took them from us way too soon. May they all be remembered for their sacrifices, as they continue to Rest In Peace. 

1808 - 15 March 1808 - We lost our Brother Night Watchman George Workner.

1844 - 19 June 1844 - We lost our Brother Night Watchman Alexander McIntosh 

1856 - 13 November, 1856 - We lost our Brother Night Watchman John O'Mayer

1857 - 14 October 1857 - We lost our Brother Sergeant William Jourdan   

1858 - 27 Jun 1858 - We lost our Brother Patrolman Henry Wilcox 

1858 - 22 September, 1858 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Benjamin Benton

1858 - 5 November, 1858 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Robert M. Rigdon

1863 - 18 Feb 1863 - We lost our Brother Sergeant William Wright 

1870 - 5 July, 1870 - We lost our Brother Police Officer James Murphy  

1870 - 17 Aug 1870 - We lost our Brother Lieutenant Richard Chanowith

1871 - 12 January, 1871 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Charles J Walsh *

1871 - 22 May, 1871 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Joseph Clark

1871 - 14 September, 1871 - We lost our Brother Detective John H. Richards

1872 - 18 August 1872 - We lost our Brother Police Officer John Christopher  

1872 - 22 Nov 1872 - We lost our Brother Patrolman Franklin Fullum *

1873 - 12 January 1873 - We lost our Brother Patrolman John H. Dames * 

1873 - 12 January 1873 - We lost our Brother Patrolman James T. Harvey * 

1873 -  6 October 1873 - We lost our Brother Patrolman Thomas Baldwin *

1873 - 11 November 1873 - We lost our Brother Patrolman William H Healy * 

1875 - 27 Nov 1875 - We lost our Brother Patrolman Robert Wright  

1877 - 4 Aug 1877 - We lost our Brother Patrolman Henry Schaper   

1883 - 27 September 1883 - We lost our Brother Captain Benjamin Franklin Kenney

1884 - 6 January, 1884 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Charles W. Fisher   

1884 - 12 Jan 1884 - We lost our Brother Patrolman George Pumphrey  

1885 - 20 March, 1885 - We lost our Brother Police Officer August Harting

1889 -4 July, 1889 - We lost our Brother Police Officer John T. Lloyd

1891 - 15 July, 1891 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Jacob Zapp

1894 - 20 June, 1894 - We lost our Brother Police Officer James T. Dunn 

1894 - 20 June, 1894 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Michael Neary

1895 - 16 June, 1895 - We lost our Brother Sergeant Benjamin Graham

1895 - 17 October, 1895 - We lost our Brother Police Officer John J. Dailey

1898 - 11 February 1898 - We lost our Brother Police Lieutenant Michael F Black

1899 -  3 July 1899 - We lost our Brother Police Detective John S. Pontier  

1899 - 29 August, 1899 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Alonzo B. Bishop

1900 11 June 1900 - We lost our Brother Patrolman Michael W. Ryan  

1902 - 20 May 1902 - We lost our Brother Police Officer John a McIntyre *

1902 - 30 July 1902 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Charles J. Donohue 

1905 - 26 January 1905 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Mathew Boone * (1) 

1905 - 25 December 1905 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Charles Spitznagle * 

1909 - 4 March 1909 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Thomas H. Worthington * (2) 

1910 - 16 Sept1910 - We lost our Brother Police Officer John T. Tuohy

1911 - 16 September 1911 - We lost our Brother Sergeant Joseph Smyth 

1912 - 25 November 1912 - We lost our Brother Officer John McGrain * 

1915 - 18 April 1915 - We lost our Brother Police Officer George C. Sauer  

1915 - 8 July 1915 We lost our Brother Police Sergeant William F. Higgins  

1915 - 21 September 1915 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Herbert Bitzel  * (3)

1915 - 25 December 1915 - We lost our Brother Sergeant Paul Meeks

1917 - 22 January 1917 - We lost our Brother Patrolman Michael Burns * (4) 

1918 - 13 February 1918 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Joseph Daniel Benedict

1918 - 19 March 1918 - We lost our Sister Police Matron Teresa Foll *  

1918 -   6 July 1918 - We lost our Brother Patrolman George Kessler 

1918 -   8 July 1918 - We lost our Brother Lieutenant Charles H McClean

1919 - 16 Feb 1919 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Albert L. Borrell  

1919 -   3 July 1919 - We lost our Brother Police Officer John J. Lanahan 

1920 - 2 October 1920 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Michael J Egan * (5) 

1921 - 1 May 1921 - We lost our Brother Patrolman Edgar Shellito *

1923 - We lost our Brother Police Officer John Edward Swift *

1924 - 2 March 1924 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Frank L. Latham 

1924 - 20 June 1924 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Charles S. Frank *

1925 - 2 January 1925 - We lost our Brother Police Officer George D. Hart * (6)

1925 - 18 May 1925 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Patrick J Coniffee * (7)

1925 -1 November 1925 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Leroy L. Mitchell  

1925 - 3 July 1925 - We lost our Brother Patrolman John E. Harris * (8) 

1926 - 9 February 1926 We lost our Brother Police Officer Milton Heckwolf

1926 - 29 June 1926 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Webster E. Schumann

1926 - 12 July 1926 - We lost our Brother Police Clerk Thomas J. Dillon 

1926 - 31 Oct 1926 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Charles W. Robb

1927 - 7 Dec 1927 - We lost our Brother Patrolman Harry Sullivan

1927 - 5 August 1927 - We lost our Brother Police Officer William F. Doehler

1928 - 12 February 1928 - We lost our Brother Sergeant George M. J. May  

1928 - 19 November 1928 - We lost our Brother Sergeant Joseph F. Carroll 

1929 - 26 July 1929 - We lost our Brother Patrolman James M. Moore   

1930 - 7 May 1930 - We lost our Brother Patrolman Robert L. Osborne 

1931 - 7 January 1931 - We lost our Brother Police Officer John P. Burns   

1931 - 10 Nov, 1931 - We lost our Brother Captain Edward J Carey 

1931 - 6 Dec, 1931 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Howard Pitts

1932 - 2 January 1932 - We lost our Brother Police Officer William A. Bell 

1932 - 5 March 1932 - We lost our Brother Patrolman Charles R. Bozman 

1932 - 4 October 1932 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Thomas F. Steinacker 

1933 - 21 April 1933 - We lost our Brother Police Officer John R. J. Block  

1933 - 7 March 1933 - We lost our Brother Police Lt. Cornelius J. Roche  

1933 -  9 March 1933 - We lost our Brother Police Capt. Charles H. Burns

1934 - 12 February 1934 - We lost our Brother Police Officer John Blank  

1934 -   5 September 1934 - We lost our Brother Serge Michael McSweeny

1934 -  2 November 1934 - We lost our Brother Police Officer John A. Stapf

1934 - 20 December 1934 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Henry W. Sudmeier

1935 - 14 February 1935 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Max Hirsh

1935 - 31 Oct 1935 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Arthur H. Malinofski

1935 - 22 Nov 1935 - We lost our Brother Patrolman James P. Lennon

1936 - 16 February 1936 - We lost our Brother Patrolman Arthur R. Cornthwaite  

1936 - 9 October 1936 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Leo Bacon

1936 - 29 October 1936 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Carroll Hanley

1936 - 28 December 1936 -  We lost our Brother Police Officer John T. King, Jr.

1937 - 31 December 1937 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Thomas J. Barlow

1937 - 17 November 1937 - We lost our Brother Capt. Charles A. Kahler *

1938 - 25 Mar 1938 - We lost our Brother Patrolman Henry E. Auld 

1938 -  1 Nov 1938 -  We lost our Brother Chief Engineer Joseph Edward Keene 

1939 - 5 May 1939 - We lost our Brother Patrolman Charles W. Frizzell 

1940 - 13 June 1940 - We lost our Brother Police Officer William L. Ryan 

1941 - 11 January 1941 - We lost our Brother Capt. Havey Von Harten 

1943 - 13 June 1943 - We lost our Brother Police Officer William J. Woodcock 

1943 - 7 November 1943 - We lost our Brother Police Officer William S. Knight 

1943 - 16 November 1943 - We lost our Brother Detective Patrolman Charles H. Reid 

1944 - 29 January 1944 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Joseph Waldsachs * (9) 

1945 - 17 August 1945 - We lost our Brother Police Officer John J. Burns  

1945 - 10 September 1945 - We lost our Brother Police Officer John B. Bealefeld  

1946 - 1 March 1946, We lost our Brother Patrolman George H. Weichert *  

1946 - 27 June 1946 - We lost our Brother Patrolman James M Shamer *  

1946 - 20 November 1946 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Elmer A. Noon  

1947 - 13 January 1947 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Fred R. Unger 

1947 - 13 October 1947 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Charles Hart * 

1948 - 13 February 1948 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Joseph Daniel Benedict 

1948 - 1 October 1948 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Thomas J. Burns 

1948 - 30 December 1948 - We lost our Brother Police Officer John W. Arnold

1949 - 4 April 1949 - We lost our Brother Police Officer James L. Joyce

1949 - 16 October 1949 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Thomas J. O'Neill

1950 - 4 August 1950 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Charles M. Hilbert 

1951 - 6 January 1951 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Roland W. Morgan

1951 - 23 June 1951 - We lost our Brother Patrolman Arthur Weiss

1953 - 1 August 1953 - We lost our Brother Police Officer James L. Scholl 

1954 - 14 February 1954 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Alfred P. Bobelis 

1954 - 19 April 1954 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Aubrey L. Lowman 

1954 - 1 July 1954 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Walter D. Davis  

1955 - 24 October 1955 - We lost our Brother Sergeant James J. Purcell

1956 - 6 Feb 1956 - - We lost our Brother Patrolman John Neill

1956 - 27 May 1956 - We lost our Brother Police Lieutenant William P. Thompson  

1956 - 29 September 1956 - We lost our Brother Police Officer John R. Phelan 

1957 - 9 October 1957 - We lost our Brother Police Officer John F. Andrews 

1958 - 19 September 1958 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Robert K. Nelson

1959 - 11 January 1959 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Richard H. Duvall, Jr.

1960 - 16 November 1960 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Warren V. Eckert 

1961 - 8 Oct 1961 - We lost our Brother Patrolman John R Falconer 

1962 - 7 April, 1962 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Henry Smith, Jr. 

1962 - 26 May 1962 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Richard D. Seebo 

1962 - 2 July 1962 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Edward J. Kowalewski 

1964 - 10 January 1964 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Francis R. Stransky 

1964 - 6 February 1964 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Claude J. Profili  

1964 - 11 September 1964 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Walter Patrick Matthys  

1964 - 15 October 1964 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Teddy L. Bafford 

1964 - 25 December 1964 - We lost our Brother Sergeant Jack Lee Cooper 

1965 - 20 January 1965 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Charles R. Ernest 

1965 - 22 July 1965 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Robert Henry Kuhn

1966 - 24 August 1946 - We lost our Brother Honorary Police Officer Simon Fried * 1*

1967 - 25 January 1967 - We lost our Brother Police Officer William J. Baumer 

1967 - 10 February 1967 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Frederick K. Kontner

1967 - 21 August 1967 - We lost our Brother Police Officer John C. Williams

1968 - 18 April 1968 - We lost our Brother Detective Richard F. Bosak

1968 - 12 November 1968 We lost our Brother Sergeant Frant Ankrom *

1969 - 20 June 1969 - We lost our Brother William Wilder

1970 - 16 January 1970 - We lost our Brother Police Officer George F. Heim

1970 - 24 March 1970 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Henry M. Mickey

1970 - 24 April 1970 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Donald W. Sager

1971 - 12 June 1971 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Carl Peterson, Jr. 

1971 - 1 August 1971 - We lost our Brother Lieutenant Martin Webb

1972 - 26 July 1972 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Lorenzo Arnest Gray 

1973 - 1 December 1973 - We lost our Brother Detective Wiley M. Owens  

1973 - 29 March 1973 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Robert M. Hurley  

1973 - 6 April 1973 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Norman Frederick Buchman  

1973 - 22 September 1973 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Calvin M. Rodwell  

1974 - 5 May 1974 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Frank Warren Whitby, Jr. 

1974 - 1 August 1974 - We lost our Brother Det Sgt Frank William Grunder, Jr. 

1974 - 15 August 1974 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Milton I. Spell  

1974 - 10 December 1974 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Martin Joseph Greiner  

1975 - 13 September 1975 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Edward S. Sherman 

1975 - 27 October 1975 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Timothy B. Ridenour 

1976 - 16 April 1976 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Jimmy Dale Halcomb 

1978 - 15 February 1978 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Edgar J. Rumpf 

1978 - 23 April 1978 - We lost our Brother Sergeant Robert John Barlow 

1978 - 27 October 1978 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Nelson F. Bell, Jr.

1979 - 2 March 1979 - We lost our Brother Police Officer John H. Spencer 

1979 - 19 August 1979 - We lost our Brother Police Officer William D. Albers 

1981 - 20 July 1981 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Ronald L. Tracey 

1984 - 28 June 1984 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Johnny LaGrone 

1984 - 3 December 1984 - We lost our Brother Detective Marcellus Ward 

1985 - 8 October 1985 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Richard J. Lear 

1985 - 18 November 1985 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Vincent J. Adolfo 

1986 - 21 July 1986 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Richard Thomas Miller 

1986 - 20 September 1986 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Robert Alexander 

1989 - 10 October 1989 - We lost our Brother Police Officer William J. Martin 

1992 - 21 September 1992 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Ira Neil Weiner

1993 - 26 May 1993 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Herman A. Jones, Sr. 

1994 - 24 June 1994 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Gerald M. Arminger 

1994 - 14 October 1994 - We lost our Brother Sergeant Richard Harris  

1997 - 7 May 1997 - We lost our Brother Lieutenant Owen Eugene Sweeney, Jr. 

1998 - 30 October 1998 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Harold Jerome Carey 

1998 - 4 November 1998 - We lost our Brother Flight Officer Barry Winston Wood 

2000 - 8 March, 2000 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Jamie Allen Roussey 

2000 - 21 April, 2000 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Kevon Malik Gavin 

2000 - 14 October, 2000 - We lost our Brother Sergeant John  David Platt 

2000 - 14 October, 2000 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Kevin Joseph McCarthy 

2001 - March 13, 2001 - We lost our Brother Agent Michael Joseph Cowdery, Jr.

2002 - 22 August, 2002 - We lost our Sister Police Officer Crystal Deneen Sheffield

2002 - 23 November, 2002 - We lost our Brother Detective Thomas G. Newman

2003 - 17 April 2003 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Walter A Taylor Jr 

2004 - 3 July 2004 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Brian Donte Winder  

2006 - 19 May, 2006 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Anthony A. Byrd

2007 - 9 January 2007 - We lost our Brother Detective Troy Lamont Chesley, Sr.

2009 - 19 Nov 2009 - We lost our Brother Special Agent Samuel Hicks  

2010 - 27 September 2010 - We lost our Brother Police Officer James Earl Fowler, III  

2010 - 16 October 2010 - We lost our Brother Detective Brian Stevenson  

2010 - 20 October 2010 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Thomas Russell Portz, Jr. 

2011 - 9 January 2011 - We lost our Brother Police Officer William Henry Torbit, Jr. 

2012 - 29 August 2012 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Forrest "Dino" Taylor 

2013 - 10 July 2013 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Shane Volk

2015 - 9 January, 2015 - We lost our Brother Police Officer Craig Chandler  

2017 - 16 November 2017 - We lost our Brother Police Detective Sean M. Suiter 

 

  

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POLICE INFORMATION

Copies of: Your Baltimore Police Department Class Photo, Pictures of our Officers, Vehicles, Equipment, Newspaper Articles relating to our department and or officers, Old Departmental Newsletters, Lookouts, Wanted Posters, and or Brochures. Information on Deceased Officers and anything that may help Preserve the History and Proud Traditions of this agency. Please contact Retired Detective Kenny Driscoll.

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Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department.

Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

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Short Numbers / Sequence Numbers

2323   58-1 Ellis S Baldwin 

82464 63-3  Ray Wheatley 

A334 Whitford Tress

A511 Edward Mattson

A795 64-2 John Schaefer  

A854 Robert Becker 

A894 Ed Bossle 06262

A942 1967 Greg Lysakoski

A995 Sonny Lawson

B046 Marvin Froneberger

B101 68-6 Bob Wilson

B183 69-11 Robert H Cooper

B210 68-11 Howard Stansbury

B229 Robert Shafer

B255 70-1 Shannon Lewis  

B270 70-1 Wayne Garrity  

B341 69-9 Jay Baker 

B343 69-9 Buford Viars  

B352 69-10 Wilbur Bartels

B366 69-11 Tom Douglas

B439 70-2 Earle Eagan 

B483 Mike Eilerman

B576 71-3 Tim Markland Sr.

B634 Michael Hires, 25 - 8-30-71

B639 Andrew Giordano

B646 71-8 Gary Starkey

B656 71-9 George Fugate 

B??? 75-1 Michael J. Mulligan 

B731 75-5 Jim Shelley

B760 72-7 Bernie Lowry  

B762 72-7 Thomas J. Niemiera

B774 72-8 David Eastman

B776 72-8 Richard James

B815 73-1 Robert Oros

B836 73-3 John Cree

B849 73-3 Charles Block

B878 76-1 Kim Koerber

B885 73-6 Tom Bailey

B887 73-6 Gene O'Sullivan

B917 73-9 Gary Budny

B926 75-9 Pete Baker

B941 Robert Stanton

B955 74-1 Gabe Bittner

B997 74-5 Matthew Bauler

C049 74-8 Dennis Boyer

C058 74-9 Edwin Schillo

C087 74-10 Melvin Pumphrey

C126 78-2 Lou Compton

C140 75-3 Sam Taylor

C149 Joseph Hands

C157 Paul Scardina

C206 75-5 Tom Cutler 15185 

C228 75-7 Lee Lilly

C232 75-7 Max Pagelsen

C257 75-7 Deb Fox  

C266 75-7 Martin Seltzer 

C285 76-1 Bob Frisch

C294 79-1 Sam Suter

C298 Joe Kleinota   

C368 Charles Klein long number 41305

C345 77-3 Mark Keller  

C346 77-3 Sgt Charles Megibow  CD

C363 77-3 Kevin Barnard

C404 78-1 Rick Rutledge

C419 79-1 Paul Sheppard

C420 80-11 Mark Lucas Tomlin

C422 81-2 Chuck McQuay

C432 80-3 Gary Cichowicz Sr.

C443 79-1 John Gerard Groncki

C547 79-7 John Boyd 

C573 Joseph Wyatt  

C581 Michael Morreale 

C599 Patricia Cochrane  EOD 9/17/79   

C602 79-9 Richard Youngbar

C603 79-10 Larry Gardner

C688 80-3 Neil Huber

C716 80-4 Charles Butch Stahm

C718 80-7 Jack Patterson

C725 80-5 Donna Watson

C739 80-5 Carol Opher

C771 80-7 James Ryan

C775 80-8 Michael P. Tomczak

C783 80-8 Darryl Moore

C799 80-9 Jay Wiley 

C807 80-9 Steve McMahon 

C810 80-10 Bobbie Magness

C844 80-11 Steve Martin

C848 81-1 Russ Pomrenke

C858 81-1 Jon Pease

C912 81-3 John Emminizer

C956 81-5 Richard Smith

C977 82-4 Michael Vaughn Sr 

C991 Lt. Vernell Shaheed 

C995 83-3 Charles Holthaus

D018 83-1 James Kirkpatrick   

D089 81-6 George Jones

D090 81-6 Terry Hendrickson  

D103 Donna Stauffer EOD 8/31/1981

D164 81-8 Patrick Conley

D184 81-9 David Jones

D202 81-9 John Hall

D233 81-10 Michael Hessler

D256 82-1 Harold “Frosty” Wertz

D275 82-2 Joe Dugan

D300 82-2 Arthur Nixon 

D340 Nancy Buyers

D365 John Dodson

D372 81-10 Mary Phelan Eilerman

D383 82-5 Victor Gearhart   

D428 82-6A Michael Fisher 

D439 82-6-B Darryl Osborne    

D446 Detective Brenda May EOD 11/5/82 

D448 Denise C. Dietz-McElroy . EOD 15 Sept 1982

D484 83-1 Ron Pettie

D485 83-1 Larry Sanders

D588 85-2 Charles Koonce Jr

D603 83-4 JoAnn Oliphant Voelker

D616 80-2 Richard Phillips

D635 84-1 Bruce Neill  

D648 David Garrett P/O ND  

D658 85-3 Kim R. Brown 

D679 84-2 Medrick Norrington

D681 84-2 Bernie Clasing  

D690 85-3 Jeffrey A. McCleese

D705 85-2 Clifton Macer

D744 85-3 Ronald Fleming Sr

D755 85-3 Howard Smith

D761 87-1 Kathy Irwin Conrad

D770 85-3 Rob Furlong  

D777 Bryan Bosley

D796 85-4 Lonnie Luedtke

D831 87-4 John Peranio

D840 86-2 Craig Hartman

D844 86-1 Steve Sturm

D856 86-1 Cynthia McCrea

D891 Eddie Mack  

D915 86-3 Sonny Dickson

D949 86-3 Barbara Halpern Schlereth 

D953 86-3 Russell Gayle Sgt 

D961 86-4 Denise Lazzara Thompson

D969 86-4 Barbara Sloan

D974 86-4 Donald Kincaid

D986 87-2 Georgiann Sault 

E006 87-5 Tammy Hensley 

E055 89-1 Maxx Anderson

E057 87-4 Mike DeBord

E086 87-3 Kenny Patty Driscoll

E115 87-4 Edward Scott

E116 87-4 Mack Smith

E137 87-4 Mike Regan

E152 87-5 Jeffrey Redd

E154 87-5 Warren Smith 

E167 87-5 Michael Broll

E180 87-5 William Hotz, Jr

E189 90-1 Donna L. White

E230 88-5 Chuck Connolly

E288 89-1 Lavon'De Alston

E298 89-2 Shonda Gooch-Williams 

E299 89-2 Ricky Mayfield  

E300 88-3 Bryan Donahue 

E308 88-2 Chet Norton

E313 88-2 Lewis Ely

E339 88-3 Michael Johnson

E397 88-5 Ginny Amos

E414 89-1 Bertram Brown

E428 89-1 Gary Yamin

E435 89-1 Jackie Folio  

E455 89-2 Robert Downs

E460 89-2 Cara Williams  .

E483 90-3 Duane Dixon  

E518 Det. Cindy Root Weinstein Osborne Sobotka 1/1990 

E529 90-1 Anthony Jobst

E546 Teresa Adams Sgt 5/14/90

E560 90-2 Thomas W. Schaeffer

E561 90-2 Jon Walter

E569 Terry Graham 

E572 90-2 Joseph Mueller

E586 90-3 Michael Mcgilicutty

E587 90-3 Kathleen Ryan Clasing

E602 90-3 Kevin Ruth

E606 90-3 Jake Guy Bell

E610 90-3 LaMonte Brown 

E658 90-4 Kevin Archer 

E666 93-4 Adam Christopher  

E689 91-1 Dianna Ckyyou 

E756 Joseph Pietro Comma Jr.

E775 91-3 Roosevelt Hammett Jr. 

E800 92-1 Kevin Forrester   

E821 92-1 Robert Gordon

E835 92-2 Dave Raugh 

E911 Jim Rhoden - Major

E913 92-4 Kevin Carvell

E914 92-4 Tommy Linton

E934 92-5 Wayne Early

E941 92-5 Lee Esworthy

E945 92-5 Tracy Geho

E962 92-5 Tony Schadt  

E964 Melissa Brown-Edick 10-06-1992 

E983 92-6 James McCartin Jr. 

F055 93-4 Garrett Keene

F099 David Blumberg

F109 93-3 R.D. Everett

F120 Tyrone "Troy" Tillery

F130 93-3 Frank Jarrell

F143 93-4 David Yost

F147 93-4 John M Washkevich

F164 93-4 William Washington

F180 93-5 Rocco O'jalei

F189 93-5 Larry Fasano

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The Secret History of City Slave Trade

The secret history of city slave trade; Blacks and whites alike of modern-day Baltimore have ignored the story of the jails that played a key role in the U.S. slave trade of the 1800s.

SCOTT SHANETHE BALTIMORE SUN

ON JULY 24, 1863, three weeks after the Battle of Gettysburg, Union officers freed the inmates of a slave trader's jail on Pratt Street near the Baltimore harbor. They found a grisly scene.

"In this place I found 26 men, 1 boy, 29 women and 3 infants," Col. William Birney of the U.S. Colored Troops wrote to his commanding officer. "Sixteen of the men were shackled and one had his legs chained together by ingeniously contrived locks connected by chains suspended to his waist."

The slaves were confined in sweltering cells or in the bricked-in yard of "Camliu's slave-pen," where "no tree or shrub grows" and "the mid-day sun pours down its scorching rays," Birney wrote. Among those imprisoned was a 4-month-old born in the jail and a 24-month-old who had spent all but the first month of his life behind bars.

The liberation of the slave jails marked the end of a brutal Baltimore institution whose story remains unknown except to a handful of local historians.

For a half-century before the Civil War, more than a dozen slave traders operated from harborside storefronts along Pratt and adjacent streets. Some advertised regularly in The Sun and other papers, declaring "5,000 Negroes Wanted" or "Negroes! Negroes! Negroes!" In an 1845 city directory, "Slave Dealers" are listed between "Silversmiths" and "Soap."

Out-of-town dealers would routinely stop for a week at Barnum's or another downtown hotel and place newspaper advertisements declaring their desire to buy slaves.

A routine spectacle was the dreary procession of black men, women and children in chains along Pratt Street to Fells Point, where ships waited to carry them south to New Orleans for auction. Weeping family members would follow their loved ones along the route; they knew their parting might be forever, as there would be no way to know where slaves shipped south would end up.

The grim drama in Baltimore was part of a major industry. Though the United States banned the import of slaves in 1808, the domestic slave trade thrived, as the need for labor shrank in the Chesapeake area and boomed in the Deep South, where the cotton gin had revolutionized agriculture. Between 1790 and 1859, according to one scholar's estimate, more than 1 million slaves were "sold south," most of them from Virginia and Maryland.

The broken families and severed relationships resulting from this commerce were a human catastrophe that can be compared in scale, if not in violence or death toll, to the original tragedy of the Middle Passage. Scholars estimate that perhaps 11 million captured Africans survived the journey to the Americas, but most went to Brazil and the Caribbean; only about 650,000 came to the colonies that would become the United States.

Yet the story of the domestic slave trade has been swallowed in America's long amnesia about slavery in general.

"A dream of mine would be to have a little Baltimore tour -- not showing where Frederick Douglass worked in Fells Point or where Thurgood Marshall lived, but where the slave traders were, where the slaves were whipped," says Ralph Clayton, a librarian at the central Pratt library and a historian who has authored most of the few works on the city's slave trade. "But I've run into many people of both races who say, 'Why are you digging this up? Leave it alone.'"

'Slave Pen'

Agnes Kane Callum, dean of Maryland's African-American genealogists, remembers seeing a still-standing slave jail as a girl in the 1930s. Her father would take the family on Sunday drives and point out a hulking brick building with barred windows at Pratt and Howard streets.

"He called it a slave pen," recalls Callum, 74, a North Baltimore grandmother who has researched slavery for 30 years. "He'd say, 'That was where my grandmother was held.'" The slave dealer sold Callum's great-grandmother, who had been snatched as a girl from a beach in the Cape Verde Islands off West Africa, to a plantation in St. Mary's County.

Camliu's and all the other physical evidence of Baltimore's once-thriving slave trade has been erased by demolition and redevelopment. But its history can be pieced together from surviving documents.

The slave jails served several purposes. Slave owners leaving for a trip could check their slaves into a jail to ensure they would not flee. Travelers stopping in Baltimore could lock up their slaves overnight while they slept at a nearby inn. Unwanted slaves or those considered unreliable because of runaway attempts could be sold and housed at the jail until a ship was ready to take them south, usually to New Orleans.

The slave ships anchored off Fells Point, which the traders' generally preferred because of fear of interference from the large number of free blacks working at the Inner Harbor, says Clayton. He has researched the story of an Amistad-style rebellion by slaves on one ship, the Decatur, southbound from Baltimore. The Sun carried ads for the ships' regular runs from Baltimore to New Orleans.

By the Civil War, while slaves outnumbered free blacks in Maryland, in Baltimore there were 10 free people of color for every slave. Yet the slave trade posed a constant threat to free African-Americans, who were in danger of being kidnapped and sold into slavery.

In fact, the warden of the Baltimore County jail ran regular newspaper notices listing black men and women he had arrested on suspicion of being runaways but who claimed to be free. Each notice would include a detailed description and the admonition, "The owner of the above described negro man is requested to come forward, prove property, pay charges and take him away, otherwise he will be discharged according to law."

The great abolitionist Frederick Douglass recalled witnessing the traffic in slaves as a boy in the 1820s: "I lived on Philpot Street, Fells Point, and have watched from the wharves, the slave ships in the basin ... with their cargoes of human flesh, waiting for favorable winds to waft them down the Chesapeake. In the deep still darkness of midnight, I have often been aroused by the dead heavy footsteps, and the piteous cries of the chained gangs that passed our doors."

At that time, the city's leading slave trader was Austin Woolfolk. Woolfolk won notoriety for beating up Benjamin Lundy, a Baltimore abolitionist, who had referred to him in his journal, Genius of Universal Emancipation, as a "monster in human shape." Lundy took Woolfolk to court, but the judge -- pro-slavery in his sympathies, like most white Baltimoreans -- took note of the provoking nature of the name-calling and fined the slave trader only $1.

In The Sun in 1838, Hope H. Slatter, a Georgia-born trader who succeeded Woolfolk as Baltimore's leading trafficker in human beings, announced under the heading "Cash for Negroes" the opening of a private jail at Pratt and Howard, "not surpassed by any establishment of the kind in the United States." Slatter offered to house and feed slaves there for 25 cents a day, declaring: "I hold myself bound to make good all jail breaking or escapes from my establishment."

To keep the supply flowing, Slatter added: "Cash and the highest prices will at all times be given for likely slaves of both sexes. ... Persons having such property to dispose of, would do well to see me before they sell, as I am always purchasing for the New Orleans market."

Facing complaints about the grim procession of chained human beings along Pratt Street, Slatter found a solution of sorts: He hired newfangled, horse-drawn "omnibuses" to move the slaves to the Fells Point docks. He would follow on horseback.

"The trader's heart was callous to the wailings of the anguished mother for her child. He heeded not the sobs of the young wife for her husband," wrote one abolitionist eyewitness whose account was discovered by Clayton.

"I saw a mother whose very frame was convulsed with anguish for her first born, a girl of 18, who had been sold to this dealer and was among the number then shipped. I saw a young man who kept pace with the carriages, that he might catch one more glimpse of a dear friend, before she was torn forever from his sight. As she saw him, she burst into a flood of tears, sorrowing most of all that they should see each other's faces no more," the abolitionist wrote.

Families Broken Up

Though Slatter assured customers and critics -- among them the abolitionist poet John Greenleaf Whittier -- that he never broke up families, Clayton found records suggesting that the claim was marketing fraud, designed to salve the consciences of owners unloading their slaves for cash. He found a manifest listing two girls ages 6 and 4 among the slaves Slatter was shipping south on one ship; their last names were different from one another and from those of all the adults on board.

"In states like Maryland," Charles MacKay, a visitor from Scotland, wrote just before the Civil War, "slavery exists in its most repulsive form; for the owner, having no use for superabundant Negroes, seems to acknowledge no duties or responsibilities toward them, but breeds them as he would cattle, that he may sell them in the best market. ... The owners have little compunction in selling the wife without the husband, or both without the children, according to the caprice or wants of the purchaser."

The agonizing consequences of the trade is captured in an 1854 flier preserved in the archives of the Maryland Historical Society.

The flier, circulated by a white Baltimore preacher, sought donations to buy the freedom of 18-year-old Eliza Rogers. Rogers had been hired out by her owner to work as a servant in another family, a common practice in the city. But when the owner decided to sell Rogers, he merely notified a slave trader, who took the young woman from her employer's house and prepared to sell her south.

Rogers' mother was particularly distraught, the flier said, because she had lost another daughter in the same manner four years earlier, "of whom she has never since heard." Rogers' stepfather, a free man, had offered to bind himself to service to work off the $850 necessary to buy her freedom. But the slave trader was unwilling to wait, so the preacher, identified as S. Guiteau, was trying to raise the necessary sum.

"Let mothers and daughters imagine the case their own," Guiteau wrote, "and they cannot but act with promptness."

Reopening Old Wounds

Why have such spellbinding stories so rarely been told? Callum, the Baltimore genealogist, attributes it to the reluctance of both races to reopen the wound left by slavery.

"White people naturally don't want anyone to know their ancestors owned slaves," Callum says. But black people, too, have kept silent, she says. Callum's maternal grandfather was born into slavery, but when the subject arose, the old man would declare, "No man owned me!"

"His voice was so full of emotion, a hush would fall over the room," Callum recalls, sitting in her North Baltimore rowhouse surrounded by the tools of the genealogical trade.

"Some black people still feel that way today, six generations later," she says. "But we cannot let people forget our holocaust, the black holocaust of slavery."

Scott Shane is a reporter for The Sun.

Pub Date: 06/20/99

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Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll 


New Department March 1862

There are many things in history that no one today can change, but that have over the years seen changes and many improvements for the better. It is true that at one time Baltimore police officers, or Patrolman to be more precise were given orders to chase and arrest slaves, this was long before today’s Baltimore Police Department, and in fact today’s Baltimore Police Department is not the same Baltimore Police Department in more ways than the obvious. If we were to shut down todays department and start a new department tomorrow in this city for obvious reasons it would be called Baltimore City Police Department.  Truth of the matter is, todays Baltimore City Police Department has never made an arrest for slaves, the Baltimore Police Department that made slave arrests ended on 27 June, 1861 when new police commissioners were appointed by the U.S. Military authorities under direction of then president Abraham Lincoln as the former BOC (Board Of Commissioners) was replaced with Columbus O'Donnell,  Archibald Sterling Jr.,  Thomas Kelso,  John R Kelso,  John W Randolph,  Peter Sauerwein,  John B Seidenstricker,  Joseph Roberts, and Michael Warner. All police prior to 27 June 1861 were dismissed from the police force and had to reapply with only the best of the former police being rehired and many left for good. One might also be interested in knowing at the time Baltimore was not as big as it is today, and the city had less than 300 police officers closer to 220 maybe 250. During the next year between June of 1861 and March 1862, the streets were protected by military police. On 3 April 1862 our newly sworn police officers stepped in, wearing a new uniform, a new badge with a new police authority, new rules, under new laws, and new leadership, While Slavery in this country was not abolished until 1864, slave arrest in Baltimore were no longer being made by our police officers. The time between 27 June 1861 and 3 April 1862 the replacement temporary fill in law enforcement wore plain clothes, and were only recognized by a simple, "Pink Ribbon" worn on their left lapel, along with an, "Espantoon" carried for the safety of the public and, the officer's protection. Other than those two identifiers, a uniform for the newly built Baltimore Police Department had not yet been selected, and so until it was, they dressed in civilian attire.

Note: Many of these provost officers were hired on fulltime as the new Baltimore Police, to take the place of the abolished officers. 

The reason for the change was largely due to not just Marshal Kane, and the BOC at the time, but also because of Mayor Brown and City Hall. Many believe after the 18 April 1861 riots on Howard Street where Baltimore civilians attacked U.S. Military on its way to Washington DC in preparation of the war between the states, Mayor Brown and Marshal Kane may have hatched a plan for a second attack to take place a day later, on 19 April 1861 at Pratt and President Streets. There are said to have been telegraphs sent from Kane to his confederate army allies telling them where and when to begin their attack on the 6th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, a volunteer militia, who passed from the President Street Station a little over 1 mile west, at Camden Station (now Camden Yards). The 6th Massachusetts Infantry were in route to Washington D.C. as were the troops just one day earlier when attacked on Howard Street. It is awfully odd that a day after that Howard Street attacks, Marshal Kane would have some of his men across town, and others stationed at the end of the soldiers’ route and not at the beginning where they knew the soldiers would be departing the trains coming in from the north before transferring to another set of trains to take them into Washington DC.  But the fact is, Marshal George Proctor Kane was arrested, he was found to have been funneling police ammo, weapons, and equipment to the Confederate Army. Kane was first taken to Fort McHenry, but at the request of the fort’s commander, Kane was moved to Ft Warren, Massachusetts. His position as Marshal of Police, and his southern sympathies were well known, and a large part as to why the department with several likeminded officers was disbanded during that June of 1861 and rebuilt into a new department, that started having meeting and firming in March of the following year but didn’t actually hit the streets until the 3rd of April 1862. There we have it, it was officially on that 3rd day of April 1862 when Baltimore City’s new Police Department with its new uniforms, new men, under new leadership hit the streets, and as that new agency it has never made slavery arrests. Note: until 1864 there were still Slave agents working in a private sector for slave owners, they would seeks warrants, and collect bounties for so called runaway slaves, when arrested by those bounty hunters they would bring them local jails, one such incident occurred on 31 May, 1862, when Isaac Brown, was picked up by bounty hunters and charged with being a runaway slave charges fled with the courts by Hamilton Stump who lived at the corner of Paca & Lombard Street. Mr. Brown was held in one of our lockups pending a hearing. It should also be known that in the nearly 160 years since that 27th day of June 1861, other than those picked up by bounty hunters on warrants in which case our turnkeys would have been ordered by the courts by court documents, to take them in. From what we can find in documents, and newspaper reports the new Baltimore Police Department's themselves didn't actively seek, or search for, and arrest slaves. Just as with any family, there have been changes, many changes, many times over until it is nowhere near the agency it was even 20 years ago, much less the agency it was more than 150 years ago since it was newly formed in 1862 or nearly 300 years ago in 1729 when the city first began it's quest for the preservation of the peace, protection of property and to arrest offenders became a goal of Baltimore residents on 8 August, 1729 when the Legislature created Baltimore Town. This town went through some ugly times trying to form a better police force as is also evident of this article - 172 Years of Policing in Baltimore HERE and Baltimore's Roistering Past HERE unlike today where have between 2500 and 3000 police in Baltimore, in 1862 we had a much smaller city and just 232 police for the entire city. Like today the larger part of the majority of our police are activist for the victims of crime, but at the same time we have compassion for the criminals we are forced to arrest by their own actions.

We hope this page helps our visitors to learn more about our police past and present, if you have questions, or further information feel free to send to us via the following email address: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

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On 13 May, 1861, the Union army entered Baltimore, occupied the city, and declared martial law. Mayor Brown was arrested on 12 September, 1861 at his home. He was imprisoned at Fort McHenry for one night. He was transported to Fort Monroe in Hampton Roads, Virginia, and held for two weeks. Next, he was moved to Fort Warren in Boston Harbor and held for fourteen months. He was released on 27 November, 1862. He returned to Baltimore and resumed his law practice. Francis Key Howard, the grandson of Francis Scott Key was also made a prisoner.

History tells of Mayor George William Brown playing an important role in controlling the Pratt Street Riot, where on 19 April, 1861 the first loss of life through bloodshed of the Civil War occurred. During the riot, Brown was said to have accompanied a column of the 6th Massachusetts regiment through the streets. When the column he was leading was assailed by the mob, "the mayor's patience was soon exhausted, and he seized a musket from the hands of one of the men and killed a man therewith." Immediately following the Riot, Baltimore saw much lawlessness, as citizens destroyed the offices of pro-Union German newspapers and looted shops in search of guns and other weapons. Mayor Brown and Maryland businessmen were said to have visited the White House to urge President Abraham Lincoln to reroute Union troops around Baltimore city to Annapolis to avoid further confrontations that they felt would result from additional troops passing through the city.

Others believe, and history would suggest, Brown wasn't trying to bring aid to Massachusetts' 6th regiment, moreover that he and Marshal Kane hatched the plan that helped lead to the deaths of four of those soldiers and serious injuries to 35 more, as well as the costing the lives of eleven Baltimore citizens during riots that could have, and should have been prevented. If we would consider the events that took place just one day earlier on Howard Street as the 48th Pennsylvania Infantry, and Washington Artillery militia companies of US Artillery, and militia arrived from Harrisburg to Baltimore's Bolton Station. A large crowd assembled at the station, subjecting the militia to verbal abuse and threats. According to the mayor at the time, “An attack would certainly have been made but for the vigilance and determination of Baltimore's police, under the command of Marshal Kane.” However, records show it was a little more than peaceful protests, with some harsh name calling as several members of those troops received serous injuries, from the rocks, bottles and bricks that were hurled into the troops as they marched down Howard Street. There were injuries, however there was no life loss on that day. In John David Hoptak's book, Dear Ma - Curtis Clay Pollock wrote home in letters to his mother of the events of 18 April 1861 - On 17 April of that fateful year, just five days after the war's opening at Ft Sumter and in response to President Abraham Lincoln’s call to arms, an 18-year-old boy by the name of Curtis Pollock marched off to war. He was made a Private in the Washington Artillery, a militia company recruited from the young volunteer’s hometown of Pottsville, Pennsylvania. Curtis Clay Pollock was one of among the more than two million soldiers who donned a Union blue and fought in defense of the United States during the American Civil War.  And, by war’s end, he would be counted among the many hundreds of thousands of those soldiers who died to help ensure that this nation might live. He was among the very first to respond to his countries call, volunteering his service immediately upon the outbreak of hostilities in the spring of 1861. The very next evening, the Washington Artillery, along with four other companies of Pennsylvania volunteers, arrived in the distressed Nation’s Capital.  As it turned out, these men, Pollock included, would be the very first Northern Volunteers to arrive in Washington following the commencement of the war and would go down in history as part of the famed "First Defenders." As earlier that same day (18 April 1861) as the volunteer soldiers of these companies they made their way through the streets of Baltimore on their journey south to Washington, they were assaulted by a vehement mob of Pro-Confederate sympathizers who hurled not only insults, but also bricks, bottles, and stones. Pollock wrote home to his mother. Pollock escaped injury, but some of the Pennsylvanians were not so lucky as they had become part of the troops that were struck down and seriously injured during the melee, thereby shedding some of the very first blood in what would prove to be America’s bloodiest war. This book serves as more written documentation of the first day of fighting in Baltimore's two days of rioting in our streets. The first day, 18 April 1861 led to the first bloodshed of the civil war, the next day on the 19th the country would have it's first deaths of the War Between the States.


The following are articles written in 1862 referencing those early changes as they occurred.

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2 April 1862 The Baltimore Sun Wed Apr 2 1862 72

Sun Paper Article 2 April 1862
Click HERE for full article

3 april 1862 The Baltimore Sun Thu Apr 3 1862 new police force with officers72

Sun Paper Article 3 April 1862
Click HERE for full article

4 April 62 The Baltimore Sun Fri Apr 4 1862 72

Sun Paper Article 4 April 1862
Click HERE for full article

4 april 1862 The Baltimore Sun Fri Apr 4 1862 new1 72

Sun Paper Article 4 April 1862
Click HERE for full article

22 mar 1862 The Baltimore Sun Sat Mar 22 1862 new police72

Sun Paper Article 22 March 1862
Click HERE for full article

24 mar 1862 The Baltimore Sun Mon Mar 24 1862 new police 72

Sun Paper Article 24 March 1862
Click HERE for full article

26 mar 1862 The Baltimore Sun Wed Mar 26 1862 72

Sun Paper Article 26 March 1862
Click HERE for full article

28 mar 1862 The Baltimore Sun Fri Mar 28 1862new police 72

Sun Paper Article 28 March 1862
Click HERE for full article

29 mar 1862 The Baltimore Sun Sat Mar 29 1862 new police 72

Sun Paper Article 29 March 1862
Click HERE for full article

31 Mar 1862 The Baltimore Sun Mon Mar 31 1862 72

Sun Paper Article 31 March 1862
Click HERE for full article

31 mar 1862 The Baltimore Sun Mon Mar 31 1862 new police262 72

Sun Paper Article 31 March 1862
Click HERE for full article

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POLICE INFORMATION

Copies of: Your Baltimore Police Department Class Photo, Pictures of our Officers, Vehicles, Equipment, Newspaper Articles relating to our department and or officers, Old Departmental Newsletters, Lookouts, Wanted Posters, and or Brochures. Information on Deceased Officers and anything that may help Preserve the History and Proud Traditions of this agency. Please contact Retired Detective Kenny Driscoll.

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Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department.

Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll 


 Good Cop Police / Bad Cop

Good  Cop  Police / Bad Cop

Baltimore City Police Insight 
Good Cop Bad Cop

The Baltimore Police Department has experienced some negative publicity in recent years due to several high profile, corruption, and brutality allegations, including the 2005 arrest of Officers William A. King and Antonio L. Murray by the FBI on federal drug conspiracy charges. But there are some things that should be mentioned about The Baltimore Police; the department has more than 3300 members, it is full of guys and gals that risk their lives every day to make sure those they swore to protect, are protected. All it takes is a single phone call to 911, or even 311 and they will do everything in their power to get to that call... more importantly, to get to you. If when they get there, you are being held at gunpoint, they will risk their own lives to get you out of that situation alive, and uninjured. If your home is on fire, and the Fire Department is in route, the police will often enter your home (risking their lives) to help get you, and your family out. So while there has been negative publicity, the number of officers involved in those types of incidents are small in number when compared to the number of police that leave their homes every day, ready to lay down their lives to protect yours.

Take a look at the number of “bad cops” on this page, and the number of “good police” on this page, then take a look at the number of “injured, and or the fallen” police, and ask yourself, would a bad cop, become crippled to help you, would a bad cop give his life to help you, the answer is, "Of course not!" So yes, there were a few bad cops, and due to recent news it seems there are a lot of bad cops, but compared to the number of police in the department (3300), the percentage of those that are bad, is far less than 1%. There are bad people everywhere, Teachers, Postal Workers, Politicians, even in the Clergy. But to think all Teachers, all Postal Workers, all Politicians, all Clergy, or all Police are bad, that is just a wrong way of thinking, a prejudice way of thinking, and I think the pages on this site will go a long way to show our police are not bad, and that our police are basically good hard working police that want to help our citizens. In small agencies were corruption is often found, it happens because other police in those agencies allow it, in Baltimore Police however they do not allow that kind of behavior, we are a big department, but still small enough to see what's going on, and here police still, “police each other”. But what about the “Thin Blue Line” that everyone hears so much of… Well first let’s talk about what a, "Thin Blue Line" really is, and then we’ll explain why in Baltimore, police will be quick to report other officers doing wrong. First, the Thin Blue Line, the Thin Blue Line, is a line of Police that stand between the, "innocent minded", to protect them from the, "criminal minded".

From Wikipedia

 The Thin Blue Line is a symbol used by law enforcement, it originated in the United Kingdom but is now more prevalent in theThin Blue Line

United States, and Canada to commemorate fallen officers, and to symbolize the relationship of the police and the community as the protectors of the citizenry from the criminal element. It is an analogy to the term Thin Red Line. Each stripe on the emblem represents certain respective figures: the blue center line represents law enforcement, the top black stripe represents the public whilst the bottom represents the criminals. The idea behind the graphic is that law enforcement (the blue line) is all stands between the violence and victimization by criminals of the would-be victims of crime.

Now the reasons police in Baltimore are quick to report a dirty cop, first, it comes down to safety; who would want a dirty cop as a “back-up”, how much can anyone rely on, or trust a dirty cop… and when your life is on the line, on a dangerous call, a dirty cop would be the last person you would want backing you up. Like anyone when it comes police we want an honest officer as our partner, a partner we can be proud to serve alongside, a partner that while we are risking our lives to protect yours, we know is risking their lives to protect ours. Ask anyone that has ever been in battle, when bullets are coming your way, or the fight is on, you are too busy protecting your partner to be scared, and you assume, your partner is doing the same for you. If your partner is unreliable for any reason, you don't feel safe. This is why good police, hate bad cops, more than the public hates bad cops, and as such we are quick to turn them. Also, if we were to work with a dirty cop, people will think we were dirty, and no good police want to be associated with a bad cop. So taking down a dirty cop is the best case an officer can make, it protects us from a criminal within our group; from someone that may have infiltrated our family.

On this page, we will try to show both sides of a story, and we’re always ready to hear your thoughts. But as police, we work with evidence, not a rumor, or speculation. We go by truth, and not animosity toward police, or any other group. There have been cases we’ve worked where information from the street, pointed to one person, but the evidence doesn’t follow the rumor, so as much as we may have liked the suspect for the crime, the second they are cleared by the evidence, they are cleared by us; the public has to do the same with some of these police cases. to quote Johnny Cochran, "If the evidence doesn't fit, you must acquit" and that is how good police work, it is how you should work, once the evidence doesn't match up with the information coming in from the street, we have considered it impossible, and if it is impossible, then the person has to be cleared. The thing with police other than possibly interviewing, we don't arrest until we have a case, so often we don't treat anyone like a criminal, or even confront them until we have information, and can charge them, and then we arrest them on a warrant. Good police doing the job right deserve the same treatment, don't treat them as criminals/bad cops, until you know for sure they are dirty, then take your information to the department's Internal Investigations (there is little they like more than arresting bad cops).

In the old days they called it profiling, to find a car with tinted windows, fancy rims, that looked like cars often driven by drug traffickers, and to stop them based on appearance alone, it is lazy police work, and to say an officer is dirty simply because he or she is wearing a badge, no better than the lazy, dirty cops we all despise. It is lazy and non-productive… to be productive, we need to let an officer do his job, don’t bait him or her by giving them a hard time. If these were drug stings or a vice cases; it would be entrapment, what we need to do is cooperate with the officer, and see where they take it. Let them cross the line first, even then, stay calm don’t give them an excuse, to turn "nothing", into something it was not. With this method of full cooperation, we will see who the good police are, and who the bad police are. But this is something that needs cooperation between good police, and good citizens. To go up to anyone, even the best person on earth in an aggressive manner, they will be put on the defensive.

This page will try to post the stories as they come up, both good and bad. If you have a story feel free to send it to us. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Some information on this page is of Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - some of this information was updated by us because we feel the only way to share the history of this department is to give the good and the bad. 

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BALTIMORE (WBFF) - In a scathing review of his time at the Baltimore City Police Department, former commissioner Anthony Batts listed a litany of problems he says he found at the department while he was leading it. The comments came during his testimony before a state commission on police reform

shamefull

"I think it was a culture of people trying to be badasses instead of a police department focusing on community policing," said Batts. "I saw that use of force was, what I thought, was too high for an organization of that size. I saw that officer-involved shootings, I believe, the level was too high. The policies were outdated."

Batts became commissioner in July 2012. He was fired in July of 2015 after the death of Freddie Gray and the riots that followed.

Response 1 - If he really thought that while he was commissioner, and this isn't just a half assed, after thought, then why didn't he address it [Between 2012 and 2015] while he was in charge. Why was it never put into writing, discussed with E&T [Education and Training]. If it was truly an issue then shame on him for not addressing it.
If I was asked what I saw as a member of the Baltimore police, I would have to say, Real police working together on a common cause to be advocates of the victims of Baltimore crime. Helping those that were forced to live in high crime areas giving them someone that they could come to when they were being victimized by high crime in a culture of not snitching on those that were bullying their hard working neighbors into looking the other way while crime was being committed all around them. Our police often worked with used or ineffective equipment, but still risked everything to make sure those that called for their help received that help.
So depending on his definition of badass, perhaps they didn't just look badass but may have been badass. After all it is hard not to look badass when you are coming to the rescue of anyone in need of your help, and you run through whatever obstacles are in the way to answer their calls. Under that definition, it is better to look like a badass, then it is to talk like a dumbass.

Response 2 - It's the mental illness of those individuals who think, thought that way in the Dept. We lived, thought, responded, handled, mourned, gave promise to those, gave condolences to those, gave support to those, locked up those and brought to justice those that chose to injure those under our charge that we swore to protect and serve. I feel no shame in that endeavor. 

Batts Statement made in 2015 is a little different than his bad ass statement of 2020 -  The full statement is below:

"There has been reporting recently on statements that have been made by Police Commissioner Anthony Batts regarding forced separations from this agency. When the Police Commissioner arrived in Baltimore in September of 2012 he was asked by the Mayor to assist in reforming the organization. The Baltimore Police Department was in need of change, the primary focus of change was to rebuild trust, trust in the community and to also build a stronger and better police department internally.
"The Police Commissioner has said he will back his officers who do a good job, officers who make mistakes but their hearts are in the right places. The Commissioner has further stated that he has no tolerance for officers who have malice in their hearts and wish to harm the community. In law enforcement in particular it is necessary to recognize those individuals, to take the opportunity to train and mentor them or as circumstances necessitate to terminate.

"Under the Police Commissioner's tenure there have been a total of 72 forced separations from the agency. Twenty-six of those separations are terminations. The remaining forty-six are individuals who resigned or retired in lieu of termination. These are individuals who have been internally charged with misconduct, false statements, criminal activities, neglecting their duty and other offenses. Had these individuals remained on the department and had not retired or resigned they would have been terminated. These numbers do not include the hundreds of officers who have nobly served their department, this profession and this community who resigned or retired in good standing.

"The forced separations assist in building trust both in the community and within the department. The community is able to tangibly see that their concerns and complaints have been heard and those individuals who have caused harm have been identified and are no longer law enforcement officers. The Baltimore Police Department will not tolerate misconduct and will not tolerate individuals who tarnish the relationship that thousands of dedicated officers have risked their lives to build. The Baltimore Police Department takes pride in its officers who should hold their heads high with the respect each and every one of them deserves. Police Commissioner Batts applauds those courageous and hardworking officers."

Commissioner Anthony Batts
Wednesday, June 3rd 2015

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Baltimore police officer suspended with pay after viral video shows him punching, tackling the man

A Baltimore police officer was suspended with pay by the department Saturday after a viral video emerged showing him repeatedly punching a man in the face before taking him to the ground.

UPDATE: Baltimore officer from viral beating video resigns, police confirm »

Interim Police Commissioner Gary Tuggle said he was “deeply disturbed” by the video, and that the incident is under investigation.

“The officer involved has been suspended while we investigate the totality of this incident,” Tuggle said. “Part of our investigation will be reviewing body worn camera footage.”

Police said a second officer on the scene at the time of the incident was placed on administrative duties pending the outcome of the investigation.

Attorney Warren Brown, who is representing the man who was punched, identified his client as Dashawn McGrier, 26. Brown said McGrier was not being charged with a crime, but was taken to a hospital and was having X-rays taken of his jaw, nose, and ribs late Saturday for suspected fractures from the altercation.

Brown said McGrier had a previous run-in with the same police officer — whom he identified as Officer Arthur Williams — in June that resulted in McGrier being charged with assaulting the officer, disorderly conduct, obstructing and hindering, and resisting arrest. Brown said that in that incident and in the one Saturday, McGrier was targeted without justification by the officer.

“It seems like this officer had just decided that Dashawn was going to be his punching bag,” Brown said. “And this was a brutal attack that was degrading and demeaning to my client, to that community, and to the police department.”

Williams could not be reached for comment.

Tuggle did not identify the officer or the man who was punched, but the department said the officer has been on the force for just over a year.

At Williams’ graduation from the police academy last year, he received awards for top performance, including for high marks in "defense tactics, physical training, and emergency vehicle operations,” for his "academic achievement, professional attitude, appearance, ability to supervise,” and for his "tireless and unwavering dedication" and "outstanding leadership ability,” according to a video of the graduation ceremony.

The police department said the incident Saturday began after two officers stopped McGrier, let him go, then approached him again to give him a citizen contact sheet.

“When he was asked for his identification, the situation escalated when he refused,” the department said. “The police officer then struck the man several times.”

Brown said McGrier was sitting on steps when Williams passed by in his vehicle, then moments later was walking down the street when the officer, now on foot, told him to stop without giving him a reason.

“My client was saying, ‘What is this all about? You don’t even have probable cause,’ ” Brown said. That’s when Williams began shoving McGrier, Brown said.

Police and communities gather for National Night Out events across Baltimore region

Tuggle asked anyone who witnessed the incident to contact the Office of Professional Responsibility at 410-396-2300.

“While I have an expectation that officers are out of their cars, on foot, and engaging citizens, I expect that it will be done professionally and constitutionally,” he said. “I have zero tolerance for behavior like I witnessed on the video today. Officers have a responsibility and duty to control their emotions in the most stressful of situations.”

The incident occurred Saturday outside Q’s Bar and Liquors in the 2600 block of E. Monument St. in East Baltimore.

The video shows the officer pushing McGrier against a wall, with his hand on McGrier’s chest, and then McGrier pushing the officer’s hand off his chest. It is then that the officer starts swinging.

The officer throws repeated punches, shoves McGrier onto rowhouse steps and continues beating him until McGrier lands on the pavement. McGrier appears to be bleeding when he gets to the ground.

McGrier appears to try to deflect some of the officer’s punches but does not punch back.

A second officer, who the department did not identify, briefly places his hand on McGrier’s arm as McGrier tries to avoid the blows but does not appear to try to stop the first officer from throwing punches.

Police pleaded with the man to drop the knife before shooting at the behavioral health clinic, body camera footage shows Shantel Allen, 28, who said she grew up with McGrier and considers him like a brother, called the escalation of the encounter by Williams shocking.

“I was speechless. I was enraged. I was hurt. I was shocked more than anything. That is really something you don’t expect,” she said. “I truly feel as though this officer needs to be dealt with in a very serious manner, so none of his fellow officers or anyone else in the criminal justice system feels like they can use this kind of force.

“This is a crime. You can’t just go around putting your hands on people,” she said.

Brown said Internal Affairs officers were at the hospital to speak with McGrier. Brown said he also had spoken with the office of Baltimore State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby. Mosby’s office did not respond to a request for comment.

The police department said Mosby’s office “provided information related to this case,” but did not explain what that meant.

Several men on Monument Street at the time — who asked not to be named, for fear of reprisal from the police for discussing the matter — said the officer who threw the punches knew McGrier from prior interactions, and that they believed he was targeting him.

They said the officer is young and had previously worked foot patrol along the corridor, but recently began working out of a car.

The men said the officer stopped McGrier on Saturday without good reason, which is why McGrier was talking back to the officer before the officer started throwing punches.

“He knows his rights, and he felt as though his rights were being violated, and he took offense to that,” one man said.

That the officer responded physically was completely out of line, and must result in serious consequences, the men said.

'I'm about to send this kid to the ... hospital': Baltimore police reviewing the interaction between the cop “We want justice. We don’t want things like that to happen. We want him to be held accountable, and not no paid suspension,” one man said.

Mayor Catherine Pugh echoed Tuggle in a statement late Saturday, in which she also called the encounter between the officer and McGrier “disturbing.” She said she was in touch with Tuggle and had “demanded answers and accountability.”

“We are working day and night to bring about a new era of community-based, Constitutional policing and will not be deterred by this or any other instance that threatens our efforts to re-establish the trust of all citizens in the Baltimore Police Department,” the mayor said.

City Councilman Brandon Scott said the department did the right thing by suspending the officer. Scott said he spoke with Tuggle after seeing the video, and the commissioner assured him it would be handled appropriately. He said the officer should be fired.

“You see that video and you see what we are trying to prevent in the police department,” said Scott, who is chair of the council's public safety committee. “It goes against the consent decree and the work we’re trying to do to rebuild trust between the community and the police department.”

The city entered into a federal consent decree in 2017 after the U.S. Justice Department found officers routinely violated people’s constitutional rights.

The justice department’s investigation began soon after the death of 25-year-old Freddie Gray following injuries he suffered in police custody. The 2015 incident became a flashpoint in the national conversation about police brutality.

A look at recent Baltimore Police scandals, from De Sousa's resignation to Gun Trace Task Force

Despite increased oversight, the city’s police department has had numerous scandals in recent months, including allegations of police misconduct.

Police said late last month that they were reviewing a different piece of viral civilian footage depicting a tense interaction with officers. The video shows a young boy being forcefully brought to the ground and handcuffed by an officer.

Seven Baltimore police officers were arrested Wednesday on racketeering charges, accused of stealing from hapless victims who often committed no crimes and of filing bloated overtime claims that almost doubled their salaries.

The indictment comes less than a month after the Justice Department reached a sweeping reform agreement with the embattled police department. U.S. Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein said Wednesday's charges involved "abuse of power" by six detectives and a sergeant on the city's Gun Trace Task Force team.

"What is particularly significant about the allegations in this indictment is that these officers were involved in stopping people who had not committed crimes," Rosenstein said. "Not only seizing their money but pocketing it."

Rosenstein said the amount of money the officers would seize, without any charges being filed, ranged from hundreds of dollars to $200,000. Some of the alleged overtime abuses included one officer who claimed overtime for a day of gambling at a casino. Another officer was paid while vacationing in Myrtle Beach, S.C., for a week.

The indicted officers include Det. Momodu Bondeva Kenton "GMoney" Gondo, 34, who also was charged in a drug-dealing conspiracy; Det. Evodio Calles Hendrix, 32; Det. Daniel Thomas Hersl, 47; Sgt. Wayne Earl Jenkins, 36; Det. Jemell Lamar Rayam, 36; Det. Marcus Roosevelt Taylor, 30; and Det. Maurice Kilpatrick Ward, 36.

Jenkins was the worst overtime offender in fiscal 2016, according to the indictment. His salary was $85,406, but he received more than $83,000 in additional overtime pay. Five of the officers claimed more than $50,000 in overtime that year.

"This kind of conduct by police officers tarnishes the reputation of all police officers," Rosenstein said.

Rosenstein said the investigation stemmed from a drug probe conducted by the Drug Enforcement Administration. Information was passed on to the FBI. Local police also aided the effort.

Baltimore Police Commissioner Kevin Davis said it was a difficult day for the city and a "punch in the gut" for his police force. But he said such crackdowns are part of the change and would be applauded by his officers.

"These seven police officers acted disgracefully," Davis said. "They betrayed the trust we have — and are trying to build upon — at a very sensitive time in our city’s history."

Last month the Justice Department and police department agreed on a series of changes that are awaiting a judge's approval. The overhaul stems from a scathing federal report on police operations issued after the widely publicized death of Freddie Gray in April 2015 while in police custody. Gray's death sparked days of sometimes-violent protests across the city.

The report claimed officers routinely conducted unlawful stops and used excessive force often targeting black residents in low-income, African-American neighborhoods. Vanita Gupta, head of the Justice Department's Civil Rights Division, said the department's "zero tolerance" strategy had little impact on crime solving while severely damaging community relations.

Six officers were charged in connection with Gray's death. Three were acquitted and charges against the others were then dropped.

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 Seven Baltimore Cops Indicted on Federal Racketeering Charges

Seven Baltimore police officers were indicted Wednesday for federal racketeering crimes ranging from filing false overtime claims while actually at a casino to robbing a driver during a traffic stop.

One of the cops is facing a separate charge for drug distribution.

Investigators said the crimes — some of them committed by some members of the elite Gun Trace Task Force — took place last year as the Department of Justice investigated the Baltimore Police Department for use of excessive force, among other violations. The racketeering investigation was conducted in secret over the past year as part of what officials described as a sweeping reform effort across the department.

Those indicted include Det. Momodu Bondeva Kenton "GMoney" Gondo, 34; Det. Evodio Calles Hendrix, 32; Det. Daniel Thomas Hersl, 47; Sgt. Wayne Earl Jenkins, 36; Det. Jemell Lamar Rayam, 36; Det. Marcus Roosevelt Taylor, 30; and Det. Maurice Kilpatrick Ward, 36.



Maryland U.S. Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein said the crimes were an abuse of power.

"They were involved in stopping people who had not committed crimes and not only seizing their money but pocketing it," he said. "These are really simply robberies by people who are wearing police uniforms."

Baltimore City Police Commissioner Kevin Davis said the indictments were "a punch in the gut" for the Baltimore Police Department. "These officers are 1930s-style gangsters as far as I'm concerned," he said.

Davis said that this investigation is part of a larger effort to reform the police department.

"Reform isn't always pretty. It's messy sometimes," Davis said.

Last August, in the wake of the tumult following Freddie Gray's death, the Justice Department issued a report that said the Baltimore police department often used excessive force and conducted unlawful traffic stops in some of the city's poorest and predominantly black communities. As part of an agreement with the DOJ, the Baltimore police department agreed to a consent decree to install sweeping reforms.

"We wouldn't be under a consent decree if we didn't' have issues. We have issues," Davis said.

Posters detailing specific allegations from 2016 sat on either side of the podium during the press conference.

In one case, four of the officers are alleged to have stolen $200,000 from a safe and bags and a watch valued at $4,000. In July 2016, three officers conspired to impersonate a federal officer in order to steal $20,000 in cash.

Prosecutors said one officer helped a friend being tracked as part of a drug conspiracy remove a GPS tracking device placed by the Drug Enforcement Agency on the person's car.

In another case, the officers watched a drug home for a full day and then stole $3,000 from people who later emerged from the home.

In yet another instance, an officer charged overtime while at a casino when the sergeant in charge was on vacation, the Maryland U.S. attorney's office said. Another officer claimed overtime while vacationing in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.

Sometimes, the officers turned off their body cameras to avoid recording what they were up to, according to the indictment.

As first reported by the Baltimore Sun, several of the officers were also highly praised in the October 2016 Baltimore Police newsletter in an article written by Lt. Chris O'Ree, a member of the ATF taskforce.

"I am extremely proud to showcase the work of Sergeant Wayne Jenkins and the Gun Trace Task Force," O'Ree wrote. "Sergeant Jenkins and his team have 110 arrests for handgun violations and seized 132 illegal handguns." He added, "I couldn't be more proud of the strong work of this team."

Rosenstein said that the investigation involved electronic surveillance and the installation of a recording device in the cars of one of the officers. He said that the recordings demonstrate "a lack of respect for the system, particularly in discussions about overtime."

One of the accused officers reportedly said that working for the police department is "easy money."

"I can assure you that for the officers that are doing their legitimate jobs, this is not easy money by any means," Rosenstein said.

The president of the Baltimore City Fraternal Order of Police, Gene Ryan, said he was "disturbed" by the charges.

"We are very disturbed over the charges filed against our members by the U.S. Attorney today," Ryan said in a statement. "These officers are entitled to due process and a fair trial in accordance with the Constitution and the laws of our state."  Shame on them all, these seven officers have tarnished the badges of their brothers and sisters, but at the same time, I hope it shows the amount of temptation the rest of us ignore, because in life there is only one and one wrong when it comes to honor, and these seven have no honor, no respect. They will end up where they belong, and federal prison is no joke. That said, God bless the rest of our Officers who through no fault of their own have been called names, ducked bricks, spit, and many other injustices because they decided they would take an oath to protect a community and as such, they will continue to fight through the injustices of prejudices thrown their way. But their pride, their integrity, and their promise to protect those that sometimes don't want protection, but crime states show protection is needed. As good police, we want nothing more than to see bad cops arrested, and good police maintain a well-deserved reward of honor. 

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Officer Santos
(Good Police) While one of our units was on an investigation, Officer Santos of the Great SW came to back up his brother and sister officers. While there he saw 3 pit bulls that were roaming the streets. One was obviously used for over breeding, as the neighborhood children ran in fear. Officer Santos was able to corral them into his patrol car and take them to a local BARCS.

God willing they will find a happy home and live out their days in comfort.

Devider Bail set at $1M for Officer Charged with Attempted Murder

 and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Contact ReportersThe Baltimore Sun
Mosby, police commissioner announce criminal charges against the city officer in the shooting.

A Baltimore police officer has been charged with attempted murder in the shooting of an unarmed burglary suspect last December, State's Attorney Marilyn J. Mosby and interim Police Commissioner Kevin Davis announced Wednesday.

The officer, 13-year veteran Wesley Cagle, is accused of shooting Michael Johansen, 46, in the 3000 block of E. Monument St. after he had been shot by two other officers. Cagle was charged with attempted first-degree murder, attempted second-degree murder, first-degree assault, and second-degree assault.

District Court Judge Halee F. Weinstein on Thursday cited the "heinous and callous nature" of the allegations in setting Cagle's bail at $1 million. Cagle's defense attorney Chaz Ball argued that Cagle is not a threat to the community or a risk to not appear in court, and instead asked for bail to be set at $150,000.

Mosby said the first two officers were justified in shooting Johansen because he refused to heed commands and made a move toward his waistband.

But Cagle "on his own initiative" came out of an alley, Mosby said, stood over Johansen, called him a "piece of [expletivehttp://www.trbimg.com/img-5798ff53/turbine/bs-md-ci-officer-charged-shooting-20150819-001" data-c-nd="473x596" />

Both Cagle and Johansen are white.

The charges come months after Mosby filed charges against six officers in the arrest and transport of Freddie Gray, the 25-year-old Baltimore man who died in April after suffering a severe spinal cord injury in a police van.

The officer who drove the van was charged with second-degree murder; others were charged with manslaughter or lesser charges.

Cagle, 45, is the first Baltimore police officer criminally charged in an on-duty shooting since Officer Tommy Sanders, who was charged with manslaughter in the 2008 shooting of an unarmed man who ran to evade arrest. A jury acquitted Sanders of all charges in 2010.

bs md gray police rare charges 20150516

Davis, the interim commissioner, called the charges a "punch in the gut" but said that when officers learn more about the case, they will "realize that this Police Department and state's attorney's office did the right thing."

"It doesn't make me feel very good at all," Davis said. "But what's really important here is that the integrity of our profession, the integrity of our agency, wins out."

Cagle was taken into custody Wednesday, police said.

Gene Ryan, president of the city's Fraternal Order of Police lodge, said that he "did not have all of the facts surrounding this investigation" but that "this officer will have his day in court, and I have faith that the judicial system will properly determine guilt or innocence."

Ryan said it was his responsibility as union president "to represent and support each and every one of our members until such time as the evidence suggests otherwise."

"As I have stated numerous times in the past, no one is above the law, but all citizens of our nation are entitled to due process."

The shooting occurred about 4:30 a.m. Dec. 28. Officers were called to the 3000 block of E. Monument St. in the Madison Eastend neighborhood for a report of a burglary at a corner grocery store.

Cagle and Officers Keven Leary and Isiah Smith took up positions on the side and rear of Patel's Corner 3 while Officer Dancy Debrosse went to the front, Mosby said. Leary and Smith then went to the side door while Cagle went to the alley.

Debrosse looked through the front door of the store, saw a masked man near the cash register and watched him head toward a side door, Mosby said. Leary and Smith confronted him, she said and told him to show his hands. When he didn't comply and instead reached toward his waist, she said, they fired at him.

He fell to the floor, his body partially inside of the store and his feet on the steps outside.

While Leary and Smith were covering him with their guns drawn, Mosby said, Cagle walked in and stood over him with his gun drawn. The man said to Cagle, "What did you shoot me with, a beanbag?"

According to Mosby, Cagle replied: "No, a .40-caliber, you piece of [expletivehttp://www.baltimoresun.com/bal-alison-knezevich-20141007-staff.html#nt=byline" class="trb_ar_by_nm_au_a" style="color: rgb(54, 54, 54); text-decoration: none; transition: color 0.2s ease-out 0s;" itemprop="author">Alison KnezevichThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.The Baltimore Sun

Officer Wesley Cagle found guilty of assault, not guilty of attempted murder in shooting of unarmed man.

A Baltimore police officer faces at least five years in prison after a jury convicted him Thursday of two charges in the shooting of an unarmed burglary suspect.

In a rare conviction in a use-of-force case against a police officer, jurors found Wesley Cagle, 46, guilty of first-degree assault and a handgun charge. Prosecutors said Cagle shot Michael Johansen in the groin as he lay in the doorway of an East Baltimore corner store after two other officers had shot the man.

"There was no need for him to take that final shot," said jury foreman Jerome Harper, 64, after he and other jurors left the courthouse.

Cagle was acquitted of the more serious charges of attempted first- and second-degree murder in the shooting.

Cagle, a 15-year veteran of the Police Department, stood silently at the defense table with his attorneys as the decision was announced. Behind him, members of his family wept as they heard the verdict.   

bs md ci cagle verdict 20160803

Cagle trial: Jury returns not-guilty verdict on one charge  but told to resume deliberations Baltimore Police Commissioner Kevin Davis and State's Attorney Marilyn J. Mosby said the case demonstrates their willingness to hold police officers accountable.  "Today's serious criminal charges against a Baltimore police officer happened because our internal investigations worked," Davis said in a statement. Police officials said Davis would take "immediate action" to terminate Cagle's employment. He has been suspended without pay. He earned $76,021.76 in 2015 on a base salary of $69,296. The two other officers who shot Johansen — Isiah Smith and Keven Leary — were cleared in the shooting and testified for the prosecution.

bal photos trial of officer wesley cagle 20160728

"I commend the witnesses who willingly testified against Mr. Cagle's reckless behavior as well as my prosecutors who presented such a strong case," Mosby said. "I'm glad to know that the jury looked at the facts and evidence presented in this case and ensured that justice was served."

Cagle's attorneys, Chaz Ball and Joe Murtha, left the courthouse without commenting.

Both Cagle and Johansen are white.

Johansen, who testified last week about getting shot, did not attend the court proceedings Thursday. On the stand, he described how he has long been addicted to heroin and went to the store the morning of Dec. 28, 2014, to "get some money."

In an interview Thursday, his attorney, Jerome Bivens, praised Mosby's office and the police officers who testified.

"We need more police officers to stand up," Bivens said. "We need more good cops to stand up against the bad cops. If we get that more often, our country will be in much better shape than it is now. This case is a conviction because the police policed themselves."

Cagle testified that he shot at Johansen because he saw a shiny object that could have been a weapon, but Harper said jurors did not believe him.

"That was thrown out," the jury foreman said. "We didn't believe that."

At a time when the public often sees video footage of police encounters, it could become harder for officers to defend their actions by saying they thought someone was armed, said A. Dwight Pettit, a Baltimore attorney who has represented clients in numerous lawsuits against police.

"With all the things the public is seeing, that defense is running kind of thin, especially when there's no evidence to corroborate," Pettit said. "I think juries are going to want more than just, 'I thought I saw him reaching [for a weaponhttp://schema.org/Organization" itemprop="publisher">The Baltimore Sun contact the reporter

Baltimore Officer Michael McSpadden will not face charges for incident caught on tape.

A longtime Baltimore police officer will not face criminal charges for hitting a handcuffed suspect in a downtown parking garage during a 2012 arrest — an incident partially caught on video by a security camera.

Prosecutors determined that the statute of limitations had expired for the most serious offenses, and they could not prove other potential charges against Officer Michael McSpadden, according to a statement released Tuesday. The officer, who has been suspended since October, earns about $69,000 a year.

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Police Seeking two Men in Retired Officer's Killing
Victim was Among 3 people Fatally Shot in City Friday
November 29, 1998 By Dan Thanh Dang

Baltimore police were searching yesterday for two unknown men in the fatal shooting of a retired city officer, who was killed in an apparent robbery outside his longtime West Baltimore home

The victim, Oliver T. Murdock, 73, was pronounced dead just before midnight Friday at Maryland Shock Trauma Center, about two hours after he was shot in the 2500 block of Riggs Ave., city homicide detectives said. Apparently unrelated shootings in the city earlier Friday left two men dead and one wounded, police said. Murdock was returning home with his wife, Katherine, 73, about 9: 50 p.m. when they were confronted by two men demanding money. In a brief scuffle, one of the robbers shot Murdock, who managed to fire one round from the .38-caliber handgun he carried, police said. Katherine Murdock was not injured, and the assailants fled in a dark-colored pickup truck, police said.

The gunfire shattered the quiet of the holiday weekend and left neighbors mourning

"I was watching 'A Miracle on 34th Street' on TV and they had just decided Kriss Kringle was real when I heard the shot," said Erika McAfee, 16, a close friend and neighbor of the Murdocks. "I ran outside and he was lying there on the ground. He was still talking so I thought he was going to be OK. "He was very well-loved and will be missed," McAfee said. Murdock was born and raised in Baltimore. He moved to Riggs Avenue 46 years ago and quickly made a name for himself. He was described by longtime friends and family as a gregarious and helpful man who volunteered in the community and played the role of grandfather for many neighborhood children. Assigned to the Southern District, Murdock retired after nearly three decades in the Police Department, then worked as a security officer for the National Security Agency for more than 18 years and, later, as a master plumber. He helped neighbors with plumbing problems, drove senior citizens on daily errands, and also had volunteered at the Central Rosemont Recreation Center to create the "Sugar and Spice Beauty Pageant" for local children in recent years. "They weren't just your neighbors," said McAfee's mother, Vada McAfee, 42. "They became our family members. Pop was always helping people. It's really, really just a great loss."

Murdock's death left many concerned for their safety in the normally quiet neighborhood, which has many elderly residents.

"This entire block is mostly people who moved here when my father did," said Dorolie Murdock Sewell, 52, the retired officer's daughter. "They're left unprotected. My father would be very worried about that. He tried to look after everybody." The Fraternal Order of Police and Metro Crime Stoppers offered a combined $4,000 reward for anyone with information leading to the arrest and conviction of the assailants. "This is a man who put in 27 years in the Police Department and survived the streets," said homicide Detective Homer Pennington, who is leading the investigation. "And then he becomes a victim of a robbery. It's a shame."

In two other shootings Friday

Two men were wounded, one fatally, in the 100 block of N. Poppleton St. about 5: 30 p.m. by a man who walked up to them and opened fire. One victim, Franswan Opi, 27, was released after hospital treatment. Police said they did not know the name of the other man, who was pronounced dead at Shock Trauma. Police found Curtis Lamont Haynes, 38, of the 4200 block of Massachusetts Ave. lying wounded about 10: 15 p.m. in the 200 block of McCurley St. in Southwest Baltimore. He had been shot several times and was pronounced dead at Shock Trauma.

Pub Date: 11/29/98

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Now In know we are all innocent until proven guilty, but when the paper says the following, is there much doubt?

Feds say sting operation catches Baltimore police officer stealing

A Baltimore police officer is accused of stealing $3,000 after investigators set up a sting in a hotel room, federal prosecutors said in a complaint that was unsealed Thursday. Officer Maurice Lamar Jeffers of Savage, a 12-year veteran who was assigned to a fugitive task force, was charged with theft of government property and "converting property of another," prosecutors said. A Baltimore police internal affairs detective who is part of an FBI corruption task force began investigating Jeffers in October after a woman said $2,200 had gone missing when members of the fugitive task force searched her boyfriend's home. Police said no cash was submitted as evidence after that search. The complaint against Jeffers includes a list of previous allegations from his internal affairs file — records that state law ordinarily allows police to shield from the public. They show Jeffers had been accused of theft three previous times. The first allegation came in 2005, the records show. The outcome of that case is listed as "unknown." In 2006 and 2011, Jeffers was accused of theft while making an arrest. Both cases are listed as "administratively closed."The most recent allegation, made by the woman in October, is listed as pending. Investigators say Jeffers was also accused in April 2010 of soliciting a prostitute while off-duty. "Although the BPD was notified, the incident was not investigated," according to the court document. "BPD records reported the incident as 'administrative tracking only.'" Attempts to reach Jeffers for comment were unsuccessful. Additionally, the state court records database shows that Jeffers was criminally charged twice. In 2006 he was charged in Prince George's County with theft, but found not guilty. And in 1998, before he was a police officer, he was charged in Baltimore with first-degree assault and a handgun violation. Those charges were dropped by prosecutors. In February, an internal affairs investigator approached a member of the task force about Jeffers. The member had not seen Jeffers commit any crimes, prosecutors said, but described his conduct as "suspicious." The member said Jeffers always bought things using cash, and cashed paychecks rather than deposit them into a bank account. Police officers and FBI agents staged a sting operation at the Executive Inn on Pulaski Highway on March 10, prosecutors said. Jeffers and members of his task force were told that a fictitious Prince George's County drug target was staying at the hotel, and they were told to secure the room so Prince George's County police could execute a search warrant. Agents equipped the hotel room with audio and video surveillance, and placed $3,500 in cash around the room. Jeffers told his partner that day to inform their sergeant that no one was in the room, prosecutors said. While the partner was away, prosecutors said, Jeffers was filmed placing money into his pockets. David Lutz, a spokesman for the U.S. Marshals Service, said the Police Department selected Jeffers for the fugitive task force and continued to supervise him. "The task force wasn't aware of any allegations about him until approached by his Baltimore City supervision," Lutz said. "We participated fully in the investigation." Jeffers faces a maximum of 10 years in prison for each of the two theft counts, prosecutors said. He made an initial appearance in U.S. District Court last week and was released pending trial

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Man Gets Life term in Killing of Retired Officer

Accomplice who Testified against Williams gets Sentence of 20 years

March 18, 2000|By Tim Craig | Tim Craig,SUN STAFF

A man convicted of killing a retired Baltimore police officer in November 1998 during what police described as a robbery spree to get money to buy baby diapers was sentenced yesterday to life in prison without parole. Christopher M. Williams, 28, was sentenced in the slaying of Oliver T. Murdock, 73, who was gunned down outside his West Baltimore home. Williams also received a 20-year sentence on a handgun conviction.

FOR THE RECORD - An article in Saturday's editions gave an incorrect first name for the widow of Oliver T. Murdock, a former Baltimore police officer who was killed in November 1998. Her name is Katie Murdock. The Sun regrets the errors. Kevin Blackman, 22, who admitted to being part of the robbery attempt and testified against Williams, received a 20-year sentence on a second-degree murder conviction. Murdock, of the 2500 block of Riggs Ave., was a police officer in the Southern District for nearly 30 years, then was a security officer for the National Security Agency for more than 18 years. Circuit Judge William D. Quarles handed down the sentences after Murdock's wife and children made an emotional plea to sentence Williams to life without parole, instead of life with parole, which his lawyer had argued for. "We lost much more than our husband and father," said Murdock's widow, Tamez Murdock. "We lost the nucleus from which our family pivoted." But the Murdocks asked the court to be lenient with Blackman, who has apologized to them for his role. Blackman's mother and former teacher also testified before sentencing, describing him as a devoted father, student and artist. They asked Quarles to reduce Blackman's plea-bargained sentence from 20 years to 10 years, but the judge refused. "It should not be the exception that a high school student passes his courses," Quarles said while handing down the sentence. "To his mother, it is not exceptional he took care of his child that he had out of wedlock." Michael Carroll, 44, the driver during the robbery spree, will be sentenced April 14.

Pub Date: 3/18/00

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I want to start this off by saying, what one officer does in one case, is not representative of what all officers do. Just as we wouldn't reward all officers for the heroic actions of a single solitary officer we should not punish, or judge all police for the wrong, or alleged wrong doings of a solitary officer. Truth be told, police officers love K9's we rely on them to help solve crime, find guns, lost people, drugs, explosives etc. Not only working dogs, but many officers have dogs as part of their families. I myself have a 17 Month old King Shepard that stands more than 30" from floor to shoulder. We all know how quickly a dog becomes part of a family, and like any family member we wouldn't want anyone bringing harm to them. So to assume all police are guilty over the alleged actions of one officer is not only wrong, but it is dangerous. We as a society need to be careful who we bring into our groups, and stop following trends to buy into whatever damaging crap is being sold through social media. Using common sense to learn facts. Recently one of the protest organizers from Ferguson took a "Shoot, Don't Shoot" course, and realized how fast these things happen, how quickly things can go wrong, and that police are the ones with their hands tied, the ones with all the rules. We need to learn the truth, and not rely on rumor... and the untrained to tell us the trained should react to those that resist. Ask yourself, about the credibility of the source before you take up a protest that in the end will have you being the one lead like sheep into slaughter.

Now in this case - Maryland's top medical examiner is prepared to testify on behalf of a Baltimore police officer facing criminal charges for slitting a dog's throat, after reviewing evidence and determining the dog was already dead when the cutting occurred. In this case, most of us do not have any of the "Facts" yes,  "Facts" of the case, we have the story, a basic account of the events that took place, but do we have "Facts" and I would say, "No!", I should also say, aside from our K9 unit, a group of police that obviously love their K9 family; many officers have dogs as their family pets. Parts of their families that they have come to love, and care for. I turn 50 last April, and until June of 2014 I had not had a pet dog, in June my wife and I rescued an 11 month German Shepard, that we later learned was a King Shepard. His name is, "Turk" named after the first K9 dog in Baltimore. And our Dog is part of our family, we all love him, and he appears to care for us too. And if you go to Baltimore Police Twitter account you'll see many officers enjoying their dogs, with their family. So let's not think for a second this is something normal for police. Now let’s also not fall into the trap of judging without facts... this is why we have courts, to preset all facts, not rumor or hearsay. Let's take a look at it this way, assuming the second officer thought the dog was in pain, he working off information from the first officer, may have felt he was doing good by putting the officer out of misery. There were rumors the dog had bitten several people, coupled with more info that the dog was either ill or injured.

Officer Jeffrey Bolger's case is scheduled for trial Thursday after he pleaded not guilty to two counts of animal mutilation, one of animal cruelty and one of misconduct in office. He is accused of killing the dog, a Shar-Pei named Nala, in June even though the animal had been brought under control with a dog pole.

Lawyers for officer accused of killing dog ask Bernstein to reconsider case 

Attorneys for Bolger have filed a motion to dismiss the case, citing the determination from David R. Fowler, Maryland's chief medical examiner. The attorneys also contend that evidence has been lost and that prosecutors did not follow procedure when filing the charges. Bolger's attorneys argued in September that officers on the scene did not have proper equipment to sedate the dogor place it into an animal carrier, and are authorized to euthanize a dog. 

"He used his knife in a fashion intended to cause the dog the least amount of pain and place the public in the least amount of danger," they said. But in their latest motion, the lawyers say they have two non-police witnesses who say the dog was "lifeless for approximately five minutes while on the dog pole" and that two police witnesses will testify that the dog "appeared to have strangulated itself prior to the dog pole being removed."

This is Sarah Gossard,
owner of 7-year-old Shar-Pei Nala.
(Baltimore Sun)

"Agent Bolger could not be certain whether the dog had died or was dying and unconscious after it was removed from the dog pole," attorneys Steven H. Levin and Charles N. Curlett Jr. wrote. "Consequently, in the event that it was still alive, Agent Bolger wanted to end its suffering." The attorneys say Fowler will testify for the defense that the lack of blood where the cutting occurred shows that the dog's heart had already stopped beating.

"In other words, Agent Bolger did not kill the stray dog," the attorneys wrote.

Fowler's conclusion contrasts with the findings of a necropsy performed by a doctor working for the city's animal control. She determined that a cut to an artery caused the dog's death. Bolger's attorneys say her conclusion is "impossible to draw" because the dog's head was removed before the evaluation. Fowler confirmed that he had consulted with the defense. The medical examiner's office performs autopsies and other forensic investigations, and Fowler said it has occasionally done work involving animals. Bolger's attorneys also say the dog pole used in the case was not preserved by police, and the dog's collar and tag are missing. Nala got loose from her home in Canton after slipping through a gate her owner, Sarah Gossard, did not realize had been left open. The dog wandered into Brewers Hill, where police said a woman tried to stop the dog and find its home. Police say the dog bit the woman, though she described it as a minor "nip." A witness reported hearing Bolger say, "I'm going to [expletivehttps://mail.google.com/mail/?view=cm&fs=1&tf=1&to=lbroadwater%40baltsun.com" target="_blank" rel="noopener" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); text-decoration: none; transition: color 0.2s ease-out 0s;">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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Mistrial declared as Shanahan jury splits
Mar 22, 1984
Karen E Warmkessel
The Sun (1837-1989); Mar 22, 1984; pg. A1
Mistrial declared as jury splits
A mistrial was declared yesterday in the case of a 29-year-old city police
Officer charged with the death of a motorcyclist last summer, after the
Jury announced it could not reach a unanimous verdict.
The Baltimore Circuit Court jury was split 8 to 4 in favor of acquitting
Officer Shanahan of the manslaughter charge was split 6-6 on whether he was. guilty of using a handgun in a crime of violence, the jury forewoman said last night. "I felt there was more that a reasonable doubt. The State did not prove [its case) beyond a reasonable .doubt," said Ray Grollman, the forewoman, who voted for acquittal "We tried." She said the jurors were "hung up from the beginning. A few jurors felt that be was guilty from the beginning.

They did not waver [forhttp://twitter.com/iduncan" target="_blank" rel="noopener" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); text-decoration: none; transition: color 0.2s ease-out 0s;">twitter.com/iduncan

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This is another case of showing how the system works... who do you think turned him in, investigated and arrested him, other police. This is not the norm for police. Police pride themselves on doing a job and doing it well, we work to protect each other and to protect the public, and when we see something like this we are as sickened as the public. A brother officer will quickly turn in a fellow officer if they suspect him or her as being dishonest. Think of it this way, the public replies on police to be honest, other police rely on each other for our safety. So when an Officer suspects another officer of dishonesty, or other violations, they turn them in, it could mean the difference of going home alive, or being killed to have a crook as a side partner, if I am relying on someone to back me up and they are not there, I could be killed, so if I suspect a side partner of criminal activity, or dishonesty, I turn them in, in a heartbeat, as would any good police.

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Police were ordered off pursuit before fatal crash, union says! Lawyer for officers says they obeyed orders

By Justin George and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun

9:05 PM EDT, September 27, 2013

Baltimore police are conducting a criminal investigation into  whether officers followed orders to end their pursuit of a sedan before  it was involved in a fatal crash this week, a police union attorney said Friday. Michael Davey, the lawyer representing the officers who  were in a unmarked car that was attempting to stop the sedan, said they  acted appropriately and obeyed orders as soon as they received them.  Three people died in the fiery accident early Tuesday at Northern  Parkway and York Road, and another was critically injured. "When  they were notified to break it off, they did," he said. "We've also  heard information coming from the department that the officers were told to break it off. We're sure that will be investigated, and ... we  believe the officers were acting within policy, based on the information they had in hand." Police confirmed that a criminal investigation into the conduct of two officers is underway. Lt. Eric Kowalczyk, a  police spokesman, declined to discuss whether any orders were given to  the officers. He said police do not want to "taint" the inquiry, in  which city prosecutors are also involved. The Baltimore Police  Department's policy prohibits officers from chasing suspects in vehicles except under "exigent circumstances," such as when officers believe  that failing to pursue could lead to injury or death. Before police can  engage in a high-speed pursuit, agency policy says, officials must  consider whether the hazards to pedestrians and other drivers are  outweighed by the importance of catching the suspect. Officers are supposed to communicate with supervisors before they begin a pursuit,  remain in contact and use their lights and siren. Police are looking  into whether the officers followed those protocols, Davey said. Angel Chiwengo, 46 of Resisterstown was one of three people killed in the  crash when the sedan slammed into a Jeep she was riding in. Relatives  say she was on her way to see her pregnant daughter, who gave birth  later that day. Her brother-in-law, Nathan Franklin, declined to comment on the new details, saying he would reserve opinions until he had more  information. City Councilman Brandon Scott, who represents the  Northeastern police district where officers first encountered the  vehicle, said police must "make sure that everybody is following their  orders." "Just the fact that we had people die in this incident,  for me, makes it a high priority," Scott said. "Every rock needs to be  turned over to make sure that every process was followed to ensure the  safety of not just the victims who unfortunately passed away, but of  everyone else on the road that night." Just past midnight on  Tuesday, plainclothes officers from the Northeastern District were in a  rental car when they observed what police described as "suspicious  activity that was criminal in nature" near Harford Road and East 25th  Street. Police said they tried to stop a Honda carrying two men.  The car fled, and the officers "followed," police said. The agency has  declined to say whether the officers were in what police would describe  as either a pursuit or chase. The Honda collided with the white  Jeep about four miles north, at York Road and Northern Parkway. The  crash also killed both passengers in the Honda: Devell Johns, 26, and  Terrell Young, 28. The Jeep's driver, 54-year-old Andrew Baker Jr., was  critically injured. The fiery crash closed the busy intersection  for 10 hours while police launched an intensive probe that included  repeated landings by a police helicopter carrying crash investigators. Police say the officers involved were Adam Storie, a two-year veteran, and Warren Banks II, a five-year veteran. Christopher Henard, a three-year veteran, was also involved, but Kowalczyk said "he is not part of the review that we asked the state's attorney to  conduct." Kowalczyk did not return an email asking what role Henard  played in the pursuit or why prosecutors weren't asked to criminally  investigate him. Davey said supervisors did ask the officers to halt their pursuit — and that the officers complied. "That is what we've been told," he said, "and that is what our officers did." Davey said he is aware police are investigating the crash to see whether  officers committed any crimes, whether they should face administrative  sanctions and whether the department or officers could face any  lawsuits. He has advised his clients not to speak to investigators until he knows more about the police probe. He said one of the officers has been asked to speak to internal investigators but declined, and the two others have not been asked. Davey called all three good officers and said the Fraternal Order of Police stood firmly behind them. "It's a horrendous incident," Davey said. "None of them ever wanted to be in a position like this. Whether it's them or some other police officer,  they have to make decisions in a split second that other citizens don't  have to make." Kowalczyk said tapes of radio chatter prior to the  crash, which are usually public record and could shed light on what took place before the crash, are being withheld pending the investigation  based on a request from the Baltimore City state's attorney's office. "We're going to be as careful and as meticulous and as diligent in this  investigation as we have to be to make sure we protect the integrity of  it," he said. The early-morning crash brought a huge response to  the scene. Among others, Maryland State Police confirmed that Baltimore  police requested about 2:45 a.m. that the state police's crash team  respond to the accident. Two state police crash team members arrived at  the scene about 4 a.m. "When they arrived, they were told by BPD  their assistance was not needed, so they left," said Greg Shipley, a  state police spokesman, in an email. "MSP was given no information about the incident." Davey said a prosecutor from the state's attorney's office was also at the crash site as part of the investigation. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

While we have a pursuit policy - let's face it, police have to follow/chase to a degree, or what kind of city will we live in, I mean it is bad enough as it is, but if police can't follow on foot, or in a car. All criminals will ever have to do is, refuse to stop, and then what? The good people in society lose. This isn't a police officer’s fault, this is and always will be the criminals fault, and if we blame the police for what the criminals are doing... while excusing the criminals because of a rough childhood. We might as well give up... Let the criminals do what they want. We won't try to have our kids grow up to be law abiding, just let them do what they want to fend for themselves... of course that sounds ridiculous. So instead let's start pointing fingers where they need. Let's direct people back to the root of the crime, and let's let our police do their job, and capture criminals... From the start of time in Baltimore, the goal of its police department has been to reduce crime by, 1) Prevention, 2) Detection and 3) Apprehension. What we really need now are citizens to start putting the blame where it belongs... On the criminals... or to come up with a better plan. Is the public not upset with high crime rates, to want to let their police do their job, follow the rules and do their jobs? Would the average citizen go after any of these criminals on their own… We need public support, or crime will only get worse – These types of accidents are in no way, shape, or form, the fault of the police, and to take the crime off the backs of the criminal and toss it onto the backs of our police is risky, it is a slippery slope that will have more and more of the faults of criminals placed on others.

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Sanity Rules in Case of Cop who Married Gang Leader
Court of Special Appeals upholds Baltimore Officer's dismissal
Of the many words from the Maryland Court of Special Appeals in the matter of Meredith Cross v. Baltimore City Police Department, I like these best: "Costs to be paid by appellant." That's double-good news for city taxpayers: We're on the hook for neither the back salary of a police officer who married a convicted murderer nor for the costs of bringing an audacious appeal of her firing to court. What we have here is formal affirmation that a woman has a right to marry anyone she wishes, including a gangster, but not a right to be a Baltimore City Cop (if she choices to marry a gang member/leader). That was pretty much the court's conclusion Tuesday in the Cross case, echoing Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. from late-19th-century Massachusetts. In 1892, a New Bedford cop who had been canned for political activity sued the city for reinstatement, arguing that his rights of free expression had been infringed. But the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts, of which Holmes was a member, found that the cop had violated an explicit prohibition against officers soliciting political donations. In the majority opinion, Holmes wrote that "there is nothing in the constitution to prevent the city from attaching obedience to this rule as a condition to the office of policeman," and famously: "The petitioner may have a constitutional right to talk politics, but he has no constitutional right to be a policeman." The cop lost the case; he did not return to his beat. (Maybe he went into whale blubber rendering, I dunno.) Holmes went on to the U.S. Supreme Court, and the rest is legal history. Which is why I scratch my head about the case of Cross, a Baltimore police officer who believed her rights were violated when superiors discovered that she had married a bad guy and kicked her off the force. Call me old-fashioned, but if a cop in 1892 couldn't get his job back because he solicited campaign contributions, a cop in 2013 certainly shouldn't expect to return to duty after marrying the reputed "supreme commander" of Dead Man Inc. We only know the details of this case because of the recent ruling by the Court of Special Appeals. And the Court of Special Appeals only knows about it because Cross appealed there after losing her suit against the city in Baltimore Circuit Court. People sue all the time over all kinds of dubious injustices. But sometimes I'm awed by the audacity. Cross, who was a police officer from 2004 to 2010, argued that her superiors had no business dismissing her because of the guy she married. Here's some of the back story, according to last week's court ruling: In 2002, when Cross was a financial adviser for American Express  in New York, a friend convinced her to start writing letters to one Carlito Cabana, a member of the Dead Man Inc. prison gang (formerly of a gang called Natural Born Killers). He was incarcerated in Maryland for second-degree murder. His gang was once a subsidiary of the infamous Black Guerrilla Family. (Irresistible side note: BGF, of course, is the gang to which Tavon "Bulldog" White belongs, according to federal prosecutors. Tavon is that busy fellow who allegedly impregnated four Maryland corrections officers — one of them twice — at the Baltimore City Detention Center. White has since pleaded guilty to racketeering and attempted murder, and has been shipped to an institution that will undoubtedly end his libertine ways.) A "serious relationship" blossomed between Cross and Cabana, and she moved to Baltimore to be closer to him. In 2004, she applied to be a city cop. When she was asked if she knew anyone in prison, she described Cabana as a "friend." But it wasn't long before Cross and Cabana were married in a "spiritual ceremony" in Patuxent Institution in Jessup. She visited him numerous times, identifying herself as his wife, telephoned him frequently and sent him money orders. In 2009, she and Cabana were officially married. That same spring, officials at the North Branch Correctional Institution in Cumberland alerted Baltimore police that Cross had been making frequent visits to see a confirmed gang leader there. That's what triggered the investigation that led to Cross' dismissal. She was found to have violated department rules by associating with a known gang member — a person of "questionable character" — and by not disclosing the full nature of their relationship. Cross had the audacity to appeal, arguing that her constitutional rights to free and intimate association had been violated. Oh, puh-leez, officer! Thankfully, sanity reigned. Two courts have now ruled against her, saying that the Police Department needs to maintain trust in the community and safety and discipline within its ranks. Neither the department's rules nor Cross' dismissal offend the Constitution. Her superiors did not prohibit Cross from marrying Cabana nor require that she divorce him. So she has every right to be the wife of a gangster; she just can't be a police officer at the same time. Please see the clerk to pay court costs on your way out. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Dan Rodricks  ' column appears each Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday. He is the host of "Midday" on WYPR-FM.

This shouldn't even need commentary, we all know it is not typical for police to marry gang leaders, drug dealers etc. in fact it is policy that police officers don't associate or fraternizewith people that are part of a criminal element – so this is not common.

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Criticism

During the past generation, the Baltimore Police Department has faced criticism from local media, elected officials, and citizen advocacy groups. The criticism has pertained to the high crime rate in the city of Baltimore, which in some years has been ranked among the highest in the nation. Accusations include numerous arrests of innocent minority citizens for seemingly minor offenses, and the failure to sufficiently assist minority victims of crime.

Arrests for Minor Offenses

In the mid-2000s, Maryland State Delegate, the Honorable Jill P. Carter daughter of the late civil rights champion, Walter P. Carter, exposed numerous cases of the Baltimore City Police arresting people for seemingly minor offenses, detaining them at Central Booking for several hours. Many were released without charges. Some were reportedly detained at Central Booking for several days before seeing a court commissioner. All arrestees in Maryland are required to have an initial appearance before a court commissioner within 24 hours of their arrest. It should also be noted that correctional officers at Central Booking were rumored to be on a work slowdown during this time. Corrections personnel are prohibited from striking. The exposure of these cases led to judicial and legislative action. In 2005, the Maryland Court of Appeals ordered all arrestees not charged within 24 hours to be released. On May 16, 2006, a Baltimore city police officer, Natalie Preston, arrested a Virginian couple for asking for directions to a major highway. The couple, released after seven hours in city jail, were not charged with any crime. They were initially taken into custody for trespassing on a public street. Their vehicle was impounded at the city lot, with windows down and doors unlocked, resulting in theft of several personal items. In 2007, the state of Maryland passed a law requiring the automatic expungement the record of one who is arrested, but then released without being charged, thereby eliminating the dilemma many such victims faced that would prevent them from passing a criminal background check if the record remained, but would not allow for a wrongful arrest lawsuit if the record were expunged. On June 23, 2010, a $870,000 comprehensive settlement was reached which culminated more than a year of negotiations between the City and Plaintiffs. The settlement provides for far-reaching reforms of the BPD's arrest and monitoring practices. The suit, which was filed in 2006, and amended in 2007, was brought on behalf of thirteen individual plaintiffs and the Maryland State Conference and Baltimore City Branch of the NAACP.

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Hats Off

To One of Our County Brothers in Blue (Ofc. Charles Stanley)

A Baltimore County Officer went into a antique store in Havre De Grace Md. where they had two scrap books full of pictures from this site and some that are not on the site. He knew they belonged to our site and our history. He didn’t know how they got away from us, or why they were being sold, but figured he would buy them first and find out later as he worked to get them back to us (their rightful owner). The store owner wanted $45 dollars per book, and wasn’t moving on his price. The County Officer dug down into his wallet, and took out the cash to buy these books and get them back to us. We are thankful for his taking the time and money to do this. If you are a County Officer and or happen to know Officer Charles Stanley, thank him again for us. He is one brother officer that will forever be in our debt, having earned his Honorary City Police Badge. Seriously he a good guy, it goes to show, while we as agencies will tease each other and have our fun, we are all brothers in blue, and when it becomes serious we do what needs to be done no questions asked. - Thanks again Officer Charles Stanley for having our backs.

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Great story from a Good Cop:

Mk9, receives a lot of emails and messages about Pit Bull and Pit Bull type dogs. News reports and stories from all over. From both sides of the spectrum as well. The good, and the bad. When they find the ones we believe will do good to help further the education of the general public, they "Share" them with hopes that people will be influenced, and motivated to see Pit Bulls and their owners for what they are, and not what the Media would make them out to be. They received a rather interesting story from one of our Officer in the Baltimore Police Department. It was a story about a Vicious Dog call, and the Officer who answered that call. The interesting part is, the officer that sent the story IS that Officer who answered the call. So here is the account, from the source;

Hey, 

I'm a Police Officer in Baltimore City. I am originally from Wilkes-Barre, and I am a fan of your organization and Pit Bulls. Today I received a call while on duty about a vicious dog chasing kids. When I came on the scene, I noticed people yelling out their windows at the dog. I followed the dog into an ally to see how it was acting. Going on my own approach, being a dog lover, I got out of my car and called the "vicious dog" over to me. The dog came over with it's tail between it's legs and panting. I grabbed my water bottle and the dog sat down next to me and began licking my pants. I started giving the dog water. I brought the dog over and waited for the pound to show up. My partner was not a fan of dogs and was startled by my approach. I suggested to him that this dog cannot be put down, and should be taken to a shelter. We took it upon ourselves to take the dog to the shelter, and transported it in the back seat in the back of our patrol car. Then I decided that I wanted to keep the dog, and spoke to the shelter about the steps to take to adopt it. The dog was originally kept outside and was filthy, and now it just might have a new home. I know you like positive pictures so I have attached a few. Have a great day and keep up the good work!


Officer Dan Waskiewicz
Baltimore City Police

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When this story was heard they couldn't not help but SMILE, and maybe do a tail shake or two! :) Then they got to thinking more about it. How awesome is this story! Not only does it have a happy ending to it, but there are also some major applause points: Instead of assuming the dog to be vicious and shoot it dead, (as we see so many times before) he analyzes the situation, and sees a nervous dog that needs help. Instead of letting animal control pick up the dog, and let it disappear, or be put down, he personally takes it to a shelter, IN HIS POLICE CRUISER!!! Finally, he offers the pup a new home forever!  So the fine folks at "Mk9" sayThank You! Officer Dan, thank you for taking the time to be patient and give a dog a chance. for stepping outside the stereo type box and seeing this for what it is. A loose dog who was nervous, and needed someone to help him. Not someone to yell at him and assume him to be dangerous. 

Here is "Bo" with his new family. A perfect picture of a perfect ending or an amazing new beginning for a dog in Baltimore City

We at www.BaltimoreCityPoliceHistory.com also thank you for helping us show you as part of the 99.9% of good police that do the right thing.

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Baltimore police officer charged with pimping wife

By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun

5:29 PM EDT, May 10, 2013 

A 31-year-old Baltimore Police officer was charged  Friday with pimping out his wife after officers from a human trafficking task force found him outside a hotel room where the woman had agreed to have sex for cash with an undercover officer. The child recovery task force was working a proactive investigation  into human trafficking when they came across a "young-looking female"  advertised as an escort on a website, police said. Officers arranged to  meet the female at a hotel near BWI airport, court records show. Inside the hotel room, a woman identified by police as Marissa  Braun-Manneh told an undercover officer that she would have sex for  $100, and she was placed under arrest, charging documents show. She said that her husband, Lamin Manneh, was waiting outside in a  car, and that she gives him her money and he drives her from  "date-to-date," according to court records. She also said that he posts  the online ads using his credit card. Police said Manneh acknowledged  his role in an interview with detectives, records show. Elena Russo, a state police spokeswoman, said both husband and wife  were charged because they appeared to be "working as a team."

Manneh, of the 2400 block of Marbourne Ave. in Baltimore, is an  officer assigned to the Baltimore Police Department's Eastern District.  State police said he was suspended without pay and that the city police  internal affairs would investigate. "This allegation is a disgrace and embarrassment to every member --  both current and retired -- who serve with the Baltimore Police  Department," Baltimore's Deputy Police Commissioner Jerry Rodriguez said in a statement. "We expect every member of this department to hold  themselves to the highest professional standards. Our colleagues and our community deserve nothing less."

Manneh was charged in Anne Arundel County District Court with one  count each of human trafficking and prostitution, and was released on  his own recognizance by a District Court commissioner, records show.  Braun was charged with one count of prostitution and also released on  her own recognizance. Attempts to reach the couple were unsuccessful. Copyright © 2013, The Baltimore Sun

This officer doesn't respect his wife, how can we possibly expect him to have respect for his police family, the community he serves or himself. All I hope is we'll realize, it was police that took him down, and just as with other cases of "Bad Cops" it doesn't matter which agency took him down. He wasn't on the side of our department, or the quality of life we strive to bring to others.
 
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Donations

Donations help with web hosting, stamps and materials and the cost of keeping the website online. Thank you so much for helping BCPH. 

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POLICE INFORMATION

Copies of: Your Baltimore Police Department Class Photo, Pictures of our Officers, Vehicles, Equipment, Newspaper Articles relating to our department and or officers, Old Departmental Newsletters, Lookouts, Wanted Posters, and or Brochures. Information on Deceased Officers and anything that may help Preserve the History and Proud Traditions of this agency. Please contact Retired Detective Kenny Driscoll.

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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NOTICE

How to Dispose of Old Police Items

Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department.

Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll 


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Rattles and Billy Clubs

Balto Sun Sun 12 Jan 1969 Rattle 72Click HERE or on the Article Above to see full size page
The Police Rattle seen in this Sun Paper article above is a Police Department Rattle from our Western District

Rattle Espantoon72

A little easier to read, this 1969 article about the Police Rattle / Billy Club
Click the above article or HERE to see full size news clipping

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Wooden Ratchet Noisemaker &  Police Rattle
The top noisemaker is a "Ratchet Noisemaker" the bottom is a "Policeman's Rattle" 

The Rattle, was used as both a tool to communicate with other officers to call for help, but in the meantime while fighting off a violent offender, it could be turned around in the hand and used as an impact weapon to fight off danger. In the two Rattles seen in the photo above the top is more of a toy, than policeman's Rattle, this can bee seen in the shape, the police version was designed in a way that would allow the officer to more easily wrap his hand around the base between the, "Ratchet" end, and the portion that secures the "Clappers." The one on the bottom of the two in the pic above looks more like a lightbulb, whereas the other has rounded edges but wouldn't allow for an officer to get a good secure grip. When using the Police Rattle as a weapon, it would be held in the officers fist with the rounded end (the part where the clappers are secured to the Rattle coming out from the palm end of the officers fist, making what is known as a, "Hammer Punch" more effect. When I mention the Hammer Punch, I should point out, that I learned of this use, I was told it was a "Backfist" weapon, in looking up the backfist, I found it to be what is called today, a Hammer Punch, or Hammer Fist. 

Police Rattle Hammer Punch 2

This shows how it would be held, swung down hitting with the end that has the screw like a karate chop to stop an attacker, for an impact weapon, it was nice, but nothing beats the Espantoon for a multipurpose law enforcement tool. 

Police Rattle Hammer Punch 3 72i

A different angle of how the Police Rattle was held to use as a weapon, in the "Back-fist" or "Hammer-fist" strike. It seems like it would be effective, but also seems carrying the thing around would be cumbersome. 

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Police Rattle

Like the Rattle above, and several of those that will be pictured below, The Police Rattle has a curved shape to it that allows it to better fit the Officer's hand between the crank handle and what would become the striking end of the Rattle. Also, if we look at the crank handle we see a groove for a strap, similar to that of the thong groove found on the espantoon. Some of our Rattles still have remnants of the wrist strap that would have been used to help the officer retain the Rattle when using  it either as a weapon, to signal for help, or to make hourly calls to nearby posts

Rattle BPD

Baltimore City Police Rattle
Police Officer, R. J. Brown, Badge #345 

This Police Rattle once belonging to a Baltimore Police Officer, R. J. Brown, Badge #345 has a small portion of what once was a leather strap that would have been used much like that of a thong on an Espantoon was/is to retain the device either while spinning it to communicate with other officers in the area, or while swinging it as it was being used as an impact weapon to fight off an attacker, or to subdue a suspect that was resisting an arrest. The leather strap, or what is left of it, can been seen on the handle that extends from the ratchet end of this device. 

Rattle BPDi

Baltimore City Police Rattle
Police Officer, R. J. Brown, Badge #345 

Here we can see what appears the be the Patrolman's name and Badge number (Police Officer, R. J. Brown, Badge #345) handwritten inside this Police Rattle. We can also see the remnants of the leather strap mentioned above, as it rests on the handle. But better, we can clearly see the defining shape of the device that would have been used to help this device more comfortably fit into an officer's hand while using it as an impact weapon.

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Wooden Ratchet Noisemaker
Not to be confused with a Police Rattle

In the above picture of a Ratchet we see what at first might look like an Old Police Rattle, in fact, I have seen these advertised on eBay and other internet Auction Sites listed as Police Rattles, But those with this shape, were more than likely what is known as a "Wooden Noisemaker," "Ratchet Noisemaker," or a "Party Noisemaker" that might have been used at festivities to make noise, or perhaps to make music. A wooden "ratchet" or "noisemaker" was an instrumental musical device played by a percussionist. It worked on the principle of a ratcheting device, made from a gearwheel, and stiff board, mounted to a handle. That handle was made to rotate freely as the instrument's player swung the entire mechanism around backward and forward to the rhythm of whatever song, or music they were playing. 

From the straight body, and straight handle on the above Ratchet we can tell this was not meant to be held as the Police Rattle versions shown in photos above this pic. Lacking the built-in retention methods found within the natural built in shapes of the Police version Rattles this one was obviously not used for police work. While it would have easily made the sounds needed to communicate, it would not have had the effects of an impact weapon as it lacks the burl head found in the Police Rattle at the end that retains the Clapper(s) That blunt burl head that is often depended on from a Police Rattle in missing in the straight wood Ratchet noisemakers. 

This version's straight shape in both the body, and in its handle, absent a groove for the retention strap is also something to avoid when trying to obtain a Police Rattle. Personally, we would probably want one of these in our collection, just to show visitors the difference, but when shopping around, keep in mind the difference is not just in what one can do that the other cannot, but also in the monetary value. A Police Rattle would hold a higher value than a simple noisemaker or musical instrument.  So if you ever go shopping for one of these, Keep in mind it take more away from just preventing it from being used as a communication device, or an impact weapon once used by our police officers, watchmen, but when we find this version which was more of a musical instrument, toy, or decorative item, it also holds a much lower value. 

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Police Rattles & Whistles

The police whistle has its roots dating back to ancient China, where night watchmen would blow into the tops of acorns to alert the towns to invading Mongolians. In ancient Egypt two blades of the papyrus plant along the Nile River were held together in between the palms of alert security guards. By blowing into the palms the papyrus leaves would make a loud vibrant sound.

In England since the late nineteenth century Metropolitan Police Services constables have been issued with the "Metropolitan" whistle (bosun or boatswain's whistle). Prior to this, constables used hand rattles or nightsticks for signal purposes. All three were used to call for back-up in areas where neighborhood beats overlapped, and following their success in London, the whistle was adopted by most countries in United Kingdom, and around the world.

Victorian Police Rattle

The origin of the rattle is not clear, but what has come to be known as the "Victorian Police Rattle" came into use sometime in the late seventeenth or early eighteenth century when night watchmen and/or village constables began using them to "raise the alarm". They proved to be an ideal method to summon aid, sound the fire alarm, or, just generally get folks attention. A traditional rattle was constructed of wood, usually oak, where one or two blades are held in a frame and a ratchet turned – generally by swinging – to make the blades 'snap' thus creating a very loud noise.

A typical Victorian Police Rattle can be found on display on the second floor of the Saint Paul Police headquarters building at 367 Grove Street. Not much different than the vintage ratchet style (tin w/wooden handle) Halloween noisemakers that your children use, today.

When Sir Robert Peel's Metropolitan Police was formed in 1829 the rattle was a standard piece of equipment issued to each London Bobby. Made to fit neatly into specially made pockets in the swallow tails of their coats, this rattle was one-bladed and had a folding handle. It was weighted with two lead plugs to make it swing easier and this also made it become a formidable weapon if necessary.

Rattles were used by police forces, fire brigades, and military units across the British Empire up through WW I. In 1883 the Metropolitan Police conducted tests and found that the sound from a whistle, already being used in some provincial forces, could be herd at 1000 yards – almost twice the effective distance of a rattle. Not only that, but the rattles were somewhat cumbersome, awkward to operate and prone to rot/warping. Constables were often subject to attacks from their own rattles. In 1884 whistles were issued in place of rattles and by 1887 all rattles had been withdrawn from use by the Met.

WhistlesOf interesting note is the fact that the original London police whistle was the "pea whistle", and it wasn't until the early twentieth century that they switched to the air whistle, often called the "Metropolitan" or bosun's whistle.

Early Saint Paul police officers on the beat communicated with each other with the same tools of the trade.

If a sergeant had gone over an officer's beat and was unable to find him, he would then go to its center and each extremity and tap his nightstick twice. This was known as a "call rap." The officer would answer in like manner. If the visiting supervisor required the presence of the officer, he would give a single rap. In lieu of the nightstick, a whistle could be used.

If an officer on his beat required the presence of another officer on an adjoining beat, he would, in ordinary cases, give a single rap or whistle, which would be answered in like manner. Then the officer making the call would again give a single rap or whistle in answer. In case of fire, riot or other emergency, he would give three taps or whistles in quick succession and all officers hearing it would answer by a single rap or whistle and immediately come to the assistance of the officer making the call. If an officer was in pursuit of a person at night, he was, from time to time, to give a single rap or whistle to inform other officers of his route.

Please note that the Saint Paul Police Departmental Manual of 1882 includes Rule No. 74, that states in part that when a disturbance occurs… "If he is opposed in the performance of his duty, he shall blow his whistle, and the policemen who hear it shall answer the same by forthwith proceeding to his assistance."

The Acme Thunderer metal or plastic police whistle that we are most familiar with (also called a pea whistle) contain a small light ball, called the pea, which rattles around inside, creating a chaotic vibrato effect that intensifies the sound. In Saint Paul the police whistle has been a part of the uniform almost from the beginning, and is mentioned in all of our historic police manuals.

acme thunderer

Police whistles fell into disuse in many countries in the mid-1900s, when early hand-held radios were brought into service. With the rise of the motor car, the whistle was no longer usefully audible in urban areas. The whistle is still used by some police forces today, especially in traffic assignments, and engraved ceremonial versions are sometimes presented to police officers upon occasions such as their retirement.

Many of our retirees remember the days prior to the hand-held radios, when they went to their beat by streetcar or bus, and reported back to headquarters from "call boxes" on the corner, at least once an hour. Some of the call boxes had a light or bell on top that would warn the beat officer of an incoming message.

They also remember that the whistle was a mandatory piece of equipment brought to roll call, the same as their handgun, pocket knife, notebook, and dime. And if you checked their pockets, you'd probably find a streetcar guide and, of course, their call box key.

Many of them, also, had to work traffic details during rush hour in the various heavily used intersections. I can still hear the long single blast, meaning "stop" and the chirping sound of the whistle as the officer signaled traffic to "move on."

This article was written by Edward J. “Ed”Steenberg, Saint Paul Police Historical Society Click HERE.

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POLICE INFORMATION

Copies of: Your Baltimore Police Department Class Photo, Pictures of our Officers, Vehicles, Equipment, Newspaper Articles relating to our department and or officers, Old Departmental Newsletters, Lookouts, Wanted Posters, and or Brochures. Information on Deceased Officers and anything that may help Preserve the History and Proud Traditions of this agency. Please contact Retired Detective Kenny Driscoll.

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Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll 


Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive
1 James Calhoun 1797 1804 4 None
2 Thorowgood Smith 1804 1808 2 None
3 Edward Johnson 1808 1816 4 Democratic-Republican
4 George Stiles 1816 1819 1 ​12 Democratic-Republican Resigned during second term, died shortly after.
(3) Edward Johnson 1819 1820 Partial Democratic-Republican Elected by the 1818 electors to finish out Mayor Stiles' term.
5 John Montgomery 1820 1822 1 Democratic-Republican
(3) Edward Johnson 1822 1824 1 Democratic-Republican
(5) John Montgomery 1824 1826 1 Democratic-Republican
6 Jacob Small 1826 1831 2 ​12 Democratic-Republican Resigned from office.
7 William Steuart 1831 1832 Partial Democratic-Republican Elected by the 1830 electors to finish out Mayor Small's term.
8 Jesse Hunt 1832 1835 1 ​12 Whig Resigned from office.
9 Samuel Smith 1835 1838 1 ​12 Democratic First elected in a special election to finish out Mayor Hunt's term, elected to a full term in 1836.
10 Sheppard C. Leakin 1838 1840 1 Whig
11 Samuel Brady 1840 1842 Partial Whig Resigned from office.
12 Solomon Hillen Jr. 1842 1843 Partial Democratic First elected in a special election to finish out Mayor Brady's term, elected to a full term in 1842. Resigned from office.
13 James O. Law 1843 1844 Partial Democratic Elected in a special election to finish out Mayor Hillen's term.
14 Jacob G. Davies 1844 1848 2 Whig
15 Elijah Stansbury, Jr. 1848 1850 1 Democratic
16 John H.T. Jerome 1850 1852 1 Democratic
17 John S. Hollins 1852 1854 1 Whig
18 Samuel Hinks 1854 1856 1 American
19 Thomas Swann 1856 1860 2 American
20 George W. Brown 1860 1861 Partial Constitutional Union Arrested and removed from office by the Union Army for Confederate sympathies.
21 John C. Blackburn 1861 1862 Partial None President of the First Branch of the City Council and served as Mayor Ex Officio from Mayor Brown's arrest until the new First Branch organized and elected a President in January 1862.
22 John L. Chapman 1862 1867 3 ​12 Republican President of the First Branch of the City Council and served as Mayor Ex Officio from January to November 1862. Elected to three terms. His final term was reduced from two years to one year per the new Maryland Constitution.
23 Robert T. Banks 1867 1871 1 Democratic The Maryland Constitution of 1867 extended the term of office from two to four years. The term was reduced back to two years in 1870.
24 Joshua Van Sant 1871 1875 2 Democratic
25 Ferdinand C. Latrobe 1875 1877 1 Democratic
26 George P. Kane 1877 1878 Partial Democratic Died in office.
(25) Ferdinand C. Latrobe 1878 1881 1 ​12 Democratic First elected in a special election to finish out Mayor Kane's term, elected to a full term in 1879.
27 William P. Whyte 1881 1883 1 Democratic
(25) Ferdinand C. Latrobe 1883 1885 1 Democratic
28 James Hodges 1885 1887 1 Republican
(25) Ferdinand C. Latrobe 1887 1889 1 Democratic
29 Robert C. Davidson 1889 1891 1 Democratic
(25) Ferdinand C. Latrobe 1891 1895 2 Democratic
30 Alcaeus Hooper 1895 1897 1 Republican
31 William T. Malster 1897 1899 1 Republican
32 Thomas G. Hayes 1899 1903 1 Democratic
33 Robert McLane 1903 1904 Partial Democratic Died in office.
34 E. Clay Timanus 1904 1907 Partial Republican President of the Second Branch. Succeeded to the mayoralty following Mayor McLane's death.
35 J. Barry Mahool 1907 1911 1 Democratic Lost reelection.
36 James H. Preston 1911 1919 2 Democratic Lost reelection.
37 William F. Broening 1919 1923 1 Republican Lost reelection.
38 Howard W. Jackson 1923 1927 1 Democratic Did not run for reelection.
(37) William F. Broening 1927 1931 1 Republican Did not run for reelection.
(38) Howard W. Jackson 1931 1943 3 Democratic Lost reelection in 1943.
39 Theodore McKeldin 1943 1947 1 Republican Did not run for reelection.
40 Thomas D'Alesandro Jr. 1947 1959 3 Democratic Lost reelection in 1959.
41 J. Harold Grady 1959 1962 Partial Democratic Resigned following appointment as a Judge to the Supreme Bench of Baltimore City (Circuit Court).
42 Philip H. Goodman 1962 1963 Partial Democratic City Council President. Succeeded to the mayoralty following Grady's resignation. Lost reelection to a full term.
(39) Theodore McKeldin 1963 1967 1 Republican Did not run for reelection.
43 Thomas D'Alesandro III 1967 1971 1 Democratic Did not run for reelection.
44 William D. Schaefer 1971 1987 4 Democratic Baltimore's longest-serving mayor. Resigned following his election as governor.
45 Clarence H. Burns 1987 1987 Partial Democratic City Council President. First African-American mayor of Baltimore. Succeeded to the mayoralty following Schaefer's resignation. Lost reelection to a full term.
46 Kurt Schmoke 1987 1999 3 Democratic First African-American elected Mayor of Baltimore. Did not run for reelection in 1999.
47 Martin O'Malley 1999 2007 2 Democratic Resigned following his election as governor.
48 Sheila Dixon 2007 2010 Partial Democratic City Council President. First female Mayor of Baltimore and first female elected Mayor of Baltimore. Succeeded to the mayoralty following O'Malley's resignation. Elected to a full term in 2007. Resigned from office in January 2010.
49 Stephanie Rawlings-Blake 2010 2016 1 ​12 Democratic City Council President. Succeeded to the mayoralty following Dixon's resignation. Elected to a full term in 2011. Did not run for reelection in 2016.
50 Catherine Pugh 2016 2019 Partial Democratic Resigned from office May 2, 2019.
51 Jack Young 2019 Incumbent Partial Democratic City Council President. Succeeded to the mayoralty following Pugh's resignation.