Officer Robert Wayne Peregoy

Friday, 21 January 2022 19:59

Officer Robert W. Peregoy

Officer Robert W PeregoyThe Baltimore Sun Wed Dec 16 2009 Click the above article to enlarge

More details

NameDescription
End of Watch 14 December 2009
City, St. SB - I795
Panel Number N/A
Cause of Death           Heart Attack
Weapon N/A
District Worked Western

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Copies of: Your Baltimore Police Department Class Photo, Pictures of our Officers, Vehicles, Equipment, Newspaper Articles relating to our department and or officers, Old Departmental Newsletters, Lookouts, Wanted Posters, and or Brochures. Information on Deceased Officers and anything that may help Preserve the History and Proud Traditions of this agency. Please contact Retired Detective Kenny Driscoll.

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How to Dispose of Old Police Items

Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department. Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll 

Retired Officer Calvin McCleese

Tuesday, 28 December 2021 17:52

Retired Officer Calvin McCleese

Retired Officer Calvin McCleese

On 5 March 1989 – Retired Officer Calvin McCleese would die effecting an arrest in his neighborhood - For years the toll bridge at the end of Dundalk Ave in Baltimore County was closed, it sat unused and inoperable. Even longer than that it was under the watchful eye of one of our Department’s finest; Southeast District’s Officer Calvin McCleese lived on the corner of Dundalk Ave and Bullneck Rd. just across the street from the bridge and Watersedge Park, the ladies and gentlemen that collected tolls were safe from anyone trying to bring them harm. Even though its location is in the county, like his family, and his post, Officer McCleese protected his neighborhood. He had two sons Michael, and Jeff that would also grow up to be Police.

Calvin McCleese worked his entire career with the Baltimore Police Department all in the same area since his joining in 1957. He started out in Eastern District's Southeast Substation until 1958/59 when Southeast Station House on Eastern Ave. opened. The kind of police Calvin was; on 22 Jan 1970, while patrolling in Highland town, he grew suspicious of a car parked around the corner from The Chesapeake Federal Savings and Loan. Officer McCleese approached the car just as the car’s tag number was broadcast over his radio in a report about a bank robbery at The Chesapeake S&L. Officer McCleese pulled his handgun and single-handedly captured the two men in the car, one of which was armed with a sawed-off shotgun. But that was 1970, and that was the way Officer McCleese worked.

He retired from the department in 1985 and went on to be the typical retired police… He still looked out for his family and his neighborhood… until this day in 1989 when a vehicle being operated by a drunk driver either not knowing the bridge was closed, or just plain lost control, but it hit the bridge embankments, had an accident and his car burst into flames… Retired Officer McCleese ran to the driver’s aid, after breaking the windows and getting the driver out, the driver woke up. Fearing he would be arrested for DWI, and an out of state warrant he decided he would fight the man that just came to his aid and saved his life. Having just fought his way into a burning car, and getting a man out, then realizing the man was drunk, Officer McCleese wasn’t about to just let him go. So he fought back, subduing the individual until Baltimore County Police would show up on scene, laying on top of him pinning him down when police arrived and took over the arrest. Officer McCleese had had a heart attack which he would succumb to on scene. Officer McCleese had held on for as long as he could. His last action in his life was to first save a life, and then to effect an arrest of a drunk driver and wanted fugitive.

Those that knew him, knew how much he loved being a Baltimore Police Officer, the pride he had in wearing our badge, and while he had already been retired for a few years, he died on this day in 1989 doing what he loved best… serving his community. BTW, one of the ladies P/O McCleese was intent on guarding at that toll booth was his wife, Rebecca McCleese the mother of his two sons.

May he never be forgotten as "His service "Honored" the City of Baltimore and the Police Department" God bless and RIP

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Donations

Donations help with web hosting, stamps and materials and the cost of keeping the website online. Thank you so much for helping BCPH. 

Paypal History Donations

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POLICE INFORMATION

If you have copies of: your Baltimore Police Department Class Photo, Pictures of our Officers, Vehicles, Equipment, Newspaper Articles relating to our department and or officers, Old Departmental Newsletters, Lookouts, Wanted Posters, and or Brochures. Information on Deceased Officers and anything that may help Preserve the History and Proud Traditions of this agency. Please contact Retired Detective Kenny Driscoll.

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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NOTICE

How to Dispose of Old Police Items

Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department. Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll 

Officer Keona Holley

Thursday, 23 December 2021 23:43

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Two suspects charged in shooting of Baltimore police officer

Two suspects in the Thursday shooting of a Baltimore police officer who was sitting in her patrol vehicle are in custody, police said.

The duo — Elliiot Knox and Travon Shaw — was charged with attempted murder in the shooting of Officer Keona Holley, as well as with murder for shooting 27-year-old Justin Johnson nearby, the Baltimore Police Department announced Friday.

The gunmen approached Holley — now in critical but stable condition, according to CNN — from behind around 1:30 a.m. Thursday and opened fire, hitting her multiple times, police said.

She was shot twice in the head, once in the leg and once in the hand, according to documents obtained by the Baltimore Sun.

Both alleged shooters had criminal histories, according to a report.

Officer Keona Holley, who was shot twice in the head, once in the leg and once in the hand, is in critical but stable condition.

Facebook

Shaw, 32, was awaiting trial in Baltimore County for a March 2020 arrest for being a felon in possession of a firearm, The Sun reported, citing courts records. He reportedly had a previous conviction for armed robbery and assault from a 2006 case.

Knox, 31, was convicted of three armed robberies in 2006, when he was 16 and sentenced to 15 years in prison.

Travon Shaw.

Travon Shaw reportedly had a previous conviction for armed robbery and assault from a 2006 case.

Baltimore Police Department via AP

Elliot Knox.

Elliot Knox was convicted of three armed robberies in 2006.

Baltimore Police Department via AP

Investigators found weapons allegedly used in the pair of shootings, the police department said.

“What we now know is that both shootings are related,” Police Commissioner Michael Harrison said during a news conference. “As we now know the perpetrators of Officer Holley’s shooting, they then left that scene, went to Lucia Avenue and then committed that homicide of Justin Johnson.”

“These incidents are tragic reminds of the culture of violence that pervades Baltimore. Life is precious and sacred but unfortunately there are those who have no regard for it,” Harrison said in a statement, blasting the “cowards responsible” for the shooting.

“No family should have to endure this type of heartache over the holidays, so please keep Officer Holley’s family and the entire community in your prayers.”

State Attorney for Baltimore Marilyn Mosby pledged to prosecute the suspects “to the fullest extent of the law.”

“We will have zero tolerance for those who seek to use violence and murder to settle their grievances. And the criminals that do will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law,” she said, according to CNN.”

Keona Holley

The State Attorney for Baltimore pledged to prosecute the suspects in Holley’s shooting “to the fullest extent of the law.”

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As officer Holley continues to fight and fight for her life, we vow to her, her family, her colleagues, this community that we will get justice on her behalf — for every victim that has been affected by these heinous acts of violence, we will get justice on their behalf.”

Holley, 39, was working an overtime shift in the Curtis Bay neighborhood when she was shot, according to the Baltimore Sun.

On Saturday, NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea on Twitter expressed his support for the wounded Baltimore cop.

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23 Dec 2021

 

Updated 6:04 PM, Dec 23, 2021

BALTIMORE — After deteriorating health and a fight for her life, Holley's family as well as medical officials made a difficult decision.

Baltimore Police Commissioner Michael Harrison and the Baltimore Police Department announce that Officer Keona Holley has been removed from life-support.

 

“Our prayers are with Officer Holley’s family and loved ones, co-workers and the entire community. I thank her and the entire BPD community for their commitment, service and sacrifice. We mourn Officer Holley’s death together and we will heal together,” said Commissioner Harrison.

The department is extending the offer of any support and assistance officers who may need it as free and confidential counseling services are available for all BPD employees. The BPD also continues to support Officer Holley’s family.

“I offer my deepest condolences to the family, friends and colleagues of Officer Keona Holley, a devoted public servant who worked selflessly to protect our community,” said Mayor Brandon Scott. “Baltimore will never forget Officer Holley’s sacrifice and commitment to making a difference in her beloved city. I ask that everyone please keep Officer Holley’s family in your prayers as they endure the holiday season without their mother, daughter, sister and loyal friend.”

The Signal 13 foundation is providing assistance to the family in their time of need. Those who wish to provide financial support to Officer Holley’s family, may do so through the Signal 13 website at signal13foundation.org. You can designate your support for Officer Holley’s family, by writing “In support of Officer Holley” in the notes box or in the memo field of a written check.

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Police Commissioner Harrison provides update on Officer Holley’s condition
 
23 December 2021
 
Baltimore, MD (23 December 2021) – It is with heavy hearts that Commissioner Michael Harrison and the Baltimore Police Department announce that Officer Keona Holley has been removed from life-support. Her health has been deteriorating over the last couple of days and her family, in consultation with her doctors, has had to make the most difficult decision. Since Officer Holley’s shooting, Dr. Thomas Scalea and the medical staff at the Shock Trauma Center at the University of Maryland Medical Center have provided her with the best medical care in the world. The Baltimore Police Department thanks them for all of their efforts. However, it was Officer Holley’s valiant fight for her life, which has brought her this far. Her strength, courage and resilience are an inspiration to us all.
 
“Our prayers are with Officer Holley’s family and loved ones, co-workers and the entire community. I thank her and the entire BPD community for their commitment, service and sacrifice. We mourn Officer Holley’s death together and we will heal together,” said Commissioner Harrison.
 
“I offer my deepest condolences to the family, friends and colleagues of Officer Keona Holley, a devoted public servant who worked selflessly to protect our community,” said Mayor Brandon Scott. “Baltimore will never forget Officer Holley’s sacrifice and commitment to making a difference in her beloved city. I ask that everyone please keep Officer Holley’s family in your prayers as they endure the holiday season without their mother, daughter, sister and loyal friend.”
 
Due to the tragic and traumatic events experienced by the BPD community over the last couple weeks, the department is extending the offer of any support and assistance officers may need. Free and confidential counseling services are available for all BPD employees. The BPD also continues to support Officer Holley’s family – as we do for all members of the force.
The Signal 13 foundation is providing assistance to the family in their time of need. Those who wish to provide financial support to Officer Holley’s family, may do so through the Signal 13 website at signal13foundation.org and click on the “Donate” button. Please designate your support for Officer Holley’s family, by writing “In support of Officer Holley” in the notes box or in the memo field of a written check.
The Signal 13 Foundation is a nonprofit 501(c)3 established to support Baltimore Police and their families in times of need. Signal 13 provides financial hardship grants and college scholarships for the children of police personnel. All donations are tax deductible. Any donations received in the name of Officer Keona Holley will be used to support her family.
 
There will, of course, be ways that we can ensure that Officer Holley’s spirit and legacy live on in this Department and this City. Those conversations will be had with her family and colleagues after we get through this somber and difficult period. However, the best way to honor Officer Holley, is to continue her mission of making Baltimore a safer place for everyone.
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Family of fallen Officer Keona Holley has a Christmas Eve message on crime
24 Dec 2021

On this Christmas Eve, the family of Baltimore police Officer Keona Holley is mourning, and they're speaking out.

Although it's the time of year to be with the ones you love, for her family - and the police department - this holiday will be about planning a funeral.

Officer Holley was pulled off life support Thursday, a week after she was ambushed in a shooting in Curtis Bay.

But Holley's sister, Lawanda Sykes, and mother, Karen Eaddy, say on this night before Christmas there's still joy, peace, and a reason to be part of the season.

"I wish everybody a Merry Christmas. I mean, it's still merry to me because I have my grandkids," said Eaddy. "I may not have my child but I have my grandkids. So, I have to lift myself up and lift them up to have Christmas without their mom."

Holley, who joined the Baltimore police force two years ago, was a 39-year-old mother with four children, the youngest a 10-year-son.

Holley's sister says they intend to have a joyful holiday but admits, amid the upbeat spirit, the pain and tears remain.

"The tears, they will never go away; they will always be there. But those tears also hold memories. They hold laughter, they hold joy. They hold her life, her essence, her spirit," said Sykes.

Police say Holley was shot several times while sitting in her police car early that morning December 16 in south Baltimore. She was shot in the head while working an overtime shift.

Holley had been on life support at the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center until Thursday, when her family made the difficult decision to remove her from life support, two days before Christmas.

"That, I don't think we're ready to talk about. Too soon for that," said Sykes.

But Sykes is talking about the seemingly-out-of-control gun violence that's happening across the city, and the violent crime that cost her sister her life. Her plea now: Stop the violence.

"Something has to be done about it. Whether it comes from our politicians or police department, whatever, no matter what. But, the message has to go to the person who's picking up the gun," said Sykes.

Police have arrested and charged two men in the shooting, Elliott Knox and Travon Shaw. They're the same men, police say, who shot and killed Justin Johnson 90 minutes after shooting Holley.

And on this night before Christmas, one sister has a message to her sister's suspected killers.

"Everybody does not have or was given the love that my sister had, and maybe that was missing from them. The only hope that I can find is as that they find forgiveness in God," said Sykes.

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Paypal History Donations

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POLICE INFORMATION

If you have copies of: your Baltimore Police Department Class Photo, Pictures of our Officers, Vehicles, Equipment, Newspaper Articles relating to our department and or officers, Old Departmental Newsletters, Lookouts, Wanted Posters, and or Brochures. Information on Deceased Officers and anything that may help Preserve the History and Proud Traditions of this agency. Please contact Retired Detective Kenny Driscoll.

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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NOTICE

How to Dispose of Old Police Items

Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department. Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll 

Baltimore Police Sword

Wednesday, 06 October 2021 04:23

police sword

The Baltimore Police Sword

Commemorating
The 200th. Anniversary
 
of the  Baltimore City Police Department

These swords were made available in 1984 to members of the department. The sword is 34” in length. Made by the Wilkinson Sword Company in England. The blade is engraved with all the important events of the Baltimore Police Department and that of Baltimore from 1634 thru the end of 1976. The blade also has engraved the 5 badges that the department has used since their beginning.  

The sword pictured here is #58 of only 152 made, it was originally owned by Thomas B. Badlik then apparently sold to Sgt. Thomas Bradley of the Traffic Division, Motorcycle Section who attended his Final Roll Call. After this Bill Hackley obtained it and had it in his personal collection until his passing  

The original price of the sword was $278.00 There were 152 made, the #1 going to Commissioner Bishop Robinson.(Actually the office of the Police Commissioner) #152 went to the Baltimore Police Dept. Museum.  

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The Baltimore Police Sword

   sword
sword3 sword4

sword5 sword6

~Sword of Honor~”  

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British Ceremonial Imports Ltd.  

The Baltimore Police Sword is manufactured from a 10th Century  

Knightly model of which there were a large number of styles befitting his station.  

The 10th Century sword was a straight and not a very long-bladed weapon, with a simple cross-shaped quillon and a relatively short grip terminated by a bell-shaped or round pommel.  

Towards the 13th Century, the blade became longer and the grip larger. While the pommel assumed a great variety of shapes ranging from a simple ball, a Norman-like helmet to a disc, a mushroom-shape, a semi-circle or a crenelated boss. *  

*BOSS - A circular prominence; a knob or projecting ornament.

Swords similar to the Baltimore Police Sword with cross-shaped quillons are found everywhere in the West, used by fighting men from the Northern European countries to the Mediterranean and even as far as North Africa and the Sahara, where the TOVAREGS still nowadays use a similar type.

  

  Wilk Sword 

WILKINSON SWORD

Sole Distributor

Baltimore Police Department 200th Anniversary Commemorative Sword of Honor With our permission, Wilkinson Sword Limited of London, England, U. K. will be honored to manufacture, in a single world-wide limited edition, made available only to members of the Baltimore Police Department, and under no circumstances made available to the general public a limited edition commemorates the history of the Baltimore Police Department. The sword, which is of intrinsic value in terms of sentiment and in line with the tradition of one of the oldest uniform services, is symbolic of authority. It is also symbolic of our tradition. It occupies a significant place in the statue of justice, where the sword is held in one hand and the weighing scales in the other.

The world-renowned sword smiths of Wilkinson Sword Limited of London, England, will hand forge the Baltimore Police Department 200th Anniversary Commemorative Sword of Honor This modern presentation sword will be approximately 30 inches in length.- Its blade will be hardened and tempered. The cross piece, shell guard, and pommel will be heavily plated in 18 ct. gold. The grip will be made of Rosewood and will be hand French polished to a mirror finish. On the sword's blade, the swordsmiths will make historical etchings of the Baltimore Police Department, its artifacts directly relating to the history of same. The limited edition will be individually numbered, commencing with number 001 which will be presented to the Commissioner of Police. To accompany the sword will be a numbered certificate of Authenticity. The names and addresses of each recipient will be entered into the registers of British Ceremonial imports Limited for all time. The Baltimore Police Department 200th. Anniversary Commemorative.  

Sword of Honor will be a legacy of history, which can be passed along to future generations of families, to serve as a reminder of the recipient's participation in the Baltimore Police Department. The recipient will also take pride in owning one of the finest examples of craftsmanship ever created; the artistry-in-steel, a rare and unusual showpiece which can be exhibited and enjoyed.  

The sword will be made available exclusively through a designated official of the Baltimore Police Department, on a first come first served basis. Prompt action in ordering will result in securing the lowest registry number. Anyone interested in purchasing a sword, please contact the Director, Property Division, 396-2575. An example sword made for the Marine Corps by Wilkinson Sword is on display in the Museum.  This information was from the original brochure for the BPD Commemorative Sword furnished by Retired Major Robert DeStefano


- Thanks to Retired Sergeant William Stone, there will be more info on this sword to come - 

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Donations

Donations help with web hosting, stamps and materials and the cost of keeping the website online. Thank you so much for helping BCPH. 

Paypal History Donations

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POLICE INFORMATION

If you have copies of: your Baltimore Police Department Class Photo, Pictures of our Officers, Vehicles, Equipment, Newspaper Articles relating to our department and or officers, Old Departmental Newsletters, Lookouts, Wanted Posters, and or Brochures. Information on Deceased Officers and anything that may help Preserve the History and Proud Traditions of this agency. Please contact Retired Detective Kenny Driscoll.

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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NOTICE

How to Dispose of Old Police Items

Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department. Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll  

 

Watchman Turner

Tuesday, 03 August 2021 14:25

Night Watchman Turner

watchman turner 1787

We'll include more information on this when it becomes available

 

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Donations

Donations help with web hosting, stamps and materials and the cost of keeping the website online. Thank you so much for helping BCPH. 

Paypal History Donations

1 black devider 800 8 72

POLICE INFORMATION

If you have copies of: your Baltimore Police Department Class Photo, Pictures of our Officers, Vehicles, Equipment, Newspaper Articles relating to our department and or officers, Old Departmental Newsletters, Lookouts, Wanted Posters, and or Brochures. Information on Deceased Officers and anything that may help Preserve the History and Proud Traditions of this agency. Please contact Retired Detective Kenny Driscoll.

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Devider color with motto

NOTICE

How to Dispose of Old Police Items

Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department. Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll 

James M. Hepbron

Tuesday, 20 July 2021 04:11

HEPBRON 72Police Commissioner James M. Hepbron 
1955 until 1961
Painting by Stanislav Rembski

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HepbronJames M. Hepbron

dogs forwebOne of The American City’s first reports on police dogs appeared in an October 1957 article by James Hepbron, Baltimore’s police commissioner. According to the article, the idea for adding the dogs to the police force came from residents, who read a 1956 newspaper series about Scotland Yard’s police dogs in London. A veteran of the U.S. Marine’s K-9 Corps volunteered to start the city’s training program, and one man offered the use of his German shepherd. Soon, a patrolman donated a second dog and asked to be assigned to the corps. The department expanded the K-9 unit with six more donated dogs in January 1957. In their first year, Baltimore’s police dogs participated in 175 arrests, and “almost daily police officers report that fugitives immediately give up any idea of fleeing at the sight of a dog.”

 

Two years later, Baltimore’s K-9 Corps included 21 trained dogs, according to a November 1959 American City report. The officers that worked with the dogs had to volunteer for the job and were charged with caring for the dogs at all times. The department required that its dogs were male German shepherds with an even temperament. They were trained first in obedience, then in attack work, and then to locate lost persons, criminals and evidence.

 

dogtraining forweb

Word of Baltimore’s successful experiences with police dogs soon spread, and the department trained other departments to establish their own K-9 units. The May 1962 edition carried a report on Lancaster, Pa.’s decision to start a K-9 Corps after officers visited Baltimore in 1959. Lancaster modeled its unit after Baltimore, asking residents to donate dogs to the corps, and selecting six handlers from among police volunteers. The Baltimore Police Department trained one of Lancaster’s officers, who then trained the five additional handlers. They built obstacles and trained the dogs to climb ramps, crawl through pipes and jump barriers. Lancaster officers soon discovered that not every donated dog would be suited for police work. One of its early lessons: “A dog, to be effective in police work, must be a ‘people-biter.’”

 

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Commissioner James M. Hepbron was subject to a hearing on February 19, 1959, led by Jerome Robinson, Democratic State Delegate for the fourth district. Delegate Robinson had a long history of challenging wiretapping and search warrants, as he believed the practice unconstitutional, against Federal law and a violation of the natural rights of the citizen. In the 90-day public hearing and investigation, Robinson stated that the commissioner "demonstrate[d] lack of a sense of propriety and in several respects a lack of comprehension on the part of the commissioner of the nature of his duties, the functions of the department, and the obligations to the citizenry" During the public hearing Hepbron incessantly left the hearing and/or refused to answer specifications against him.

During the hearing, Robinson urged the commissioner to resign in the public interest. Robinson wrote, "it is obvious that he has outlived his position. His administration has produced continuing deterioration and the demoralization of the department".

The charges against Hepbron included:

  • Flouting of the civil and constitutional rights of the citizens of Baltimore City. Illegal taps of private and public telephone lines.
  • Errors in judgment and administration.
  • Concepts of policing which, because of brutality and insentivity, are shocking to decent thinking people.

Despite considerable evidence, Hebron denied to address he was acting illegally. Delegate Robinson cited 36 cases where the cases were dropped or defendants released because of planted evidence and other means of framing suspects. He called these offenses, "a creature of commissioner Hepbron". Robinson also cited the Green Spring Avenue assault by a police officer of a 15-year-old boy, countless shootings of unarmed auto-thieves, and illegal raids on properly licensed establishments. At one point Robinson stated the head of the city police was "an SS officer in a Chesterfield coat who is impatient with the Bill of Rights and intolerant of the constitutional liberties and prerogatives of the people"

Alvin J. T. Zumbrun, former managing director of the Criminal Justice Commission, issued a statement against Robinson in the commissioner's defense. He described the charges brought against Hepbron "the utterances of an angry madman possessed with the mania to have the police commissioner removed at all costs" Zumbrun cited details of multiple instances where he believed Robinson had lied, citing instances as small as a phone call, office visit or passing informal greeting by Robinson to Zumbrun. While Zumbrun's evidence never addressed actual police violations of state law, Zumbrun continued to press for the expulsion of Robinson of the General Assembly of Maryland to Governor J. Millard Tawes

 

James Hepbron's Book on the Penal System HERE

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Sun Mar 15 1959 Hepbron headlineSun Mar 15 1959 Hepbron pg1
Click HERE or Article above for full size story
Sun Mar 15 1959 Hepbron pg2
Click HERE or Article above for full size story
Sun Mar 15 1959 Hepbron pic
 
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Donations

Donations help with web hosting, stamps and materials and the cost of keeping the website online. Thank you so much for helping BCPH. 

Paypal History Donations

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POLICE INFORMATION

If you have copies of: your Baltimore Police Department Class Photo, Pictures of our Officers, Vehicles, Equipment, Newspaper Articles relating to our department and or officers, Old Departmental Newsletters, Lookouts, Wanted Posters, and or Brochures. Information on Deceased Officers and anything that may help Preserve the History and Proud Traditions of this agency. Please contact Retired Detective Kenny Driscoll.

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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NOTICE

How to Dispose of Old Police Items

Please contact Det. Ret. Kenny Driscoll if you have any pictures of you or your family members and wish them remembered here on this tribute site to Honor the fine men and women who have served with Honor and Distinction at the Baltimore Police Department. Anyone with information, photographs, memorabilia, or other "Baltimore City Police" items can contact Ret. Det. Kenny Driscoll at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. follow us on Twitter @BaltoPoliceHist or like us on Facebook or mail pics to 8138 Dundalk Ave. Baltimore Md. 21222

Copyright © 2002 Baltimore City Police History - Ret Det Kenny Driscoll 

 

Baltimore Police Newsletters

Sunday, 28 March 2021 04:08

Baltimore Police Newsletters

back of No coat NYPD news about BPD traffic uniform order

 Click HERE or the article above to see full size article

Newsletter from that year PDF click HERE

 

 

Baltimore Police Newsletters

 

1964 Newsletter Assist an Officer

1965 Newsletter Assist an Officer

1966 Newsletter Assist an Officer

1966 Newsletter Night Patrol

1967 Newsletter Vol 1 1 to 22 March 2 1967 to December 20 1967

1968 Newsletter Vol 2 1 to 25 January 3 1968 to December 18 1968

1969 Newsletter Vol 3 1 to 20 January 1 1969 to December 31 1969

1970 Newsletter Vol 4 1 to 26 January 14 1970 to December 30 1970

1971 Newsletter Vol 5 1 to 26 January 13 1971 to December 29 1971

1972 Newsletter Vol 6 Issue 1 to 26 January 12 1972 to December 27 1972

1973 Newsletter Vol 7 Issue 1 to 26 January 10 1973 to December 26 1973

1974 Newsletter Vol 8 Issue 1 to 26 January 9 1974 to December 24 1974

1975 Newsletter Vol 9 Issue 1 to 26 January 8 1975 to December 24 1975

1976 Newsletter Vol 10 Issue 1 to 26 January 7 1976 to December 22 1976

1977 Newsletter Vol 11 Issue 1 to 26 January 5 1977 to December 21 1977

1978 Newsletter Vol 12 Issue 1 to 26 January 4 1978 to December 20 1978

1979 Newsletter Vol 13 Issue 1 to 26 January 3 1979 to December 19 1979

1980 Newsletter Vol 14 Issue 1 to 27 January 2 1980 to December 31 1980

1981 Newsletter Vol 15 Issue 1 to 26 January 14 1981 to December 30 1981

1982 Newsletter Vol 16 Issue 1 to 26 January 13 1982 to December 29 1982

1983 Newsletter Vol 17 Issue 1 to 26 January 12 1983 to December 28 1983

1984 Newsletter Vol 18 Issue 1 to 26 January 11 1984 to December 24 1984

1985 Newsletter Vol 19 Issue 1 to 26 January 9 1985 to December 24 1985

1986 Newsletter Vol 20 Issue 1 to 26 January 8 1986 to December 24 1986

1987 Newsletter Vol 21 Issue 1 to 26 January 7 1987 to December 23 1987

1988 Newsletter Vol 22 Issue 1 to 26 January 6 1988 to December 21 1988

1989 Newsletter Vol 23 Issue 1 to 26 January 4 1989 to December 19 1989

1990 Newsletter Vol 24 Issue 1 to 26 January 3 1990 to December 18 1990

1991 Newsletter Vol 25 Issue 1 to 26 January 2 1991 to December 16 1991

1992 Newsletter Vol 26 Issue 1 to 20 January 1 1992 to December 16 1992

1993 Newsletter Vol 27 Issue 1 to 7 January 1993 to December 1993

1994 Newsletter Vol 28 Issue 1 to 5 May 1994 to October 1994

1995 Newsletter Vol 29 Issue 1 to 7 January 1995 to November 1995

1996 Newsletter Vol 30 Issue 1 to 5 January 1996 to July August 1996

1997 Newsletter Vol 31 Issue 1 to 6 January 3 May 1997 to December 1997

1998 Newsletter Vol 32 Issue 1 to 6 January 1998 to November 1998

1999 Newsletter Vol 33 Issue 1 to 19 January 1999 to December 22 1999

2000 Newsletter Blue Line News Vol 34 Issue 1 to 11

2001 Newsletter Blue Line News Vol 35 Issue 1 to 7 Special Edition

2002 Newsletter Blue Lines News Vol 35 Issue 10 to 11

2003 Newsletter Blue Line News Vol 36 Issue 1 to 2

2004 Newsletter Blue Line News Vol 26 Issue 3 to 12

2005 Newsletter Blue Line 04 04 05

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2005 Newsletter Blue Line News Vol 27 Issue 1 to 4

2006 Newsletter Blue Line 06 01 06 Special Edition

2006 Newsletter Blue Line 12 11 2006

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2007 Newsletter Blue Line Feb 2007 Special Edition

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2011 Newsletter Blue Line Editions 1 to 3

2015 Newsletter Vol 1 Issue 1 to 4

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Sgt. Edward M. Sawyer

Tuesday, 23 March 2021 00:40
Sgt. Edward M. Sawyer
 
E. M. Sawyer Dies at Work
 
CLICK HERE FOR AUDIO
 
Dec 12, 1956
 
Had been officer 22 years Sgt. Edward M. Sawyer, a member the Baltimore Police Department for 22 years, died suddenly yesterday as he worked on the automobile of the police Commissioner in the garage near headquarters. He was 50 years old.
 
Sgt. Sawyer, who had been chauffeur for three commissioners, was polishing automobile used by Commissioner James M Hepbron when he collapsed. He was pronounced dead on arrival to mercy hospital.
A native of Baltimore, Sgt. Sawyer was appointed to the department in June, 1934. His first assignment was to the motorcycle traffic division. He was made the commissioners over during the ministration of Hamilton Atkinson. Later he served in the late Commissioner Beverly Ober and continued on the job under Mr. Hepbron.
He was made a Sgt. in March, 1948.
 
Baseball Career
 
Before joining the Police Department, Mr. Sawyer was a shortstop in professional baseball, playing in Frederick, Maryland. And Birmingham Alabama before going into police work.
Funeral services will be held Friday at the John Jay. Going and Sun establishment at Hollins and Poppleton streets. The hour for the service had not been set last night. Sgt. Sawyer is survived by his wife, Mrs. Mary Sawyer; a son Edward F. Sawyer; a brother Morton; and three sisters, Mrs. Selma Mills, Mrs. Hilda Johnson and Mrs. Mildred Smith, all of Baltimore
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